Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Google

HP Chromebook 11 redesign quietly appears

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

The new Chromebook has the latter design, much to the surprise of Youtuber Lachlan, who discovered the alternate Chromebook 11 and posted a video of it. Apparently, Lachlan, who resides in Australia, purchased what was labelled as a “white Chromebook 11″, but soon realized that it was not the same as the other Chromebooks 11, but rather a miniature Chromebook 14.

Read more

Google Chrome 36 Dev Adds Extra Step for Profile Deletion

Filed under
Google
Software

Google developers have released a new build of their Chrome browser, 36.0.1976.2, and this is quite a hefty update, full of various changes and improvements. Even so, it’s not recommended that you switch to the new version, if you already are running on of the two other branches, Stable or Beta.

Developers usually make the big changes in the Development branch and most of those modifications trickle down into the Beta, and then finally into the Stable. It may take a while for all the features to be implemented for the majority of users, but this is the safest way to do it.

Read more

Why a Chromebook is the best Mother’s Day gift

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

The last reason why you should get your mom a Chromebook is their value. Currently, the most expensive Chromebook available for purchase is the HP Chromebook 14 at $299 or $349, depending on which version you get. This is the one I purchased, since it has the largest screen for a Chromebook, and has Intel’s new Haswell Celeron processors. (For more on my thoughts of the HP Chromebook 14, click here). Most other Chromebooks only cost $199 to $299, and that is if you purchase it new. Chromebooks can be purchased used, and still seem like a brand new laptop, as long as they look new cosmetically.

This may seem expensive as a mother’s day gift, but do not think about it as a one time gift, but as a long term investment. Your mother will never have to purchase a new computer again, since Chromebooks are built to last forever and come with free updates. She will never have to purchase antivirus again, nor any other software, since most of the apps on the Chrome Web Store are free. (For a guide on the Chrome Web Store, click here). By purchasing your mom a Chromebook, you save her from ever having to worry about her computer again. This saves both your mom and you time and money.

Read more

Dangerous Decision in Oracle v. Google: Federal Circuit Reverses Sensible Lower Court Ruling on APIs

Filed under
Android
Google
Legal

We're still digesting today's lengthy decision in the Oracle v. Google appeal, but we're disappointed—and worried. The heart of the appeal was whether Oracle can claim a copyright on Java APIs and, if so, whether Google infringed that copyright. According to the Federal Circuit today, the answer to both questions was a qualified yes—with the qualification being that Google may have a fair use defense.

Quick background: When it implemented the Android OS, Google wrote its own version of Java. But in order to allow developers to write their own programs for Android, Google relied on Java APIs. Application Programming Interfaces are, generally speaking, specifications that allow programs to communicate with each other. So when you type a letter in a word processor, and hit the print command, you are using an API that lets the word processor talk to the printer driver, even though they were written by different people.

Read more

Google Play Services 4.4 now rolling out

Filed under
Android
Google

A new version of Google Play Services with several new features has been released and has begun rolling out. The added features and improvements in Google Play Services 4.4 can enhance your user experience while using Android apps.

Read more

What are the alternatives to Google Chrome and Firefox on Linux?

Filed under
Linux
Google
Moz/FF

Say what you want about web browsers on Linux, I just miss Internet Explorer. No let's be serious. A great thing about Linux distributions is in general that they come packaged with a good browser. If that browser is not your favorite, you can easily install another one (and you don't necessarily need a browser to download your favorite browser). For most users, however, this favorite browser will be Chrome or Firefox, and there are reasons for that: they are both good browsers. For more adventurous users, there is also Opera, which recently improved. But, there exist browsers out there which are a lot more exotic, with particular features and goals. I shall propose you eight examples: eight browsers which may not be as complete as Chrome or Firefox, but which are definitely worth checking out for their philosophies or design.

Read more

DosBox 0.1.4 – For ChromeOS!

Filed under
Google
Software
Gaming

Over the years I’ve looked at DosBox many times, I’ve covered it when it was included as part of the Puppy Arcade distro and I’ve covered it as a package in its own right.

To say the package is impressive is to grossly understate this piece of software.

Read more

Chromebooks to go offline as Intel moves inside

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Intel has finally joined the Chrome OS bandwagon ensuring it won’t become obsolete in the post PC (Windows) era. The two companies hosted a joint press event on May 6 where they announced quite a lot of Chromebooks powered by Intel chips. Intel enjoyed a monopolistic position during the Windows era and the partnership between Intel & Windows was known as Wintel, which unfortunately was bad for the industry as it lead to some anti-competitive business practices which heavily damaged (and almost destroyed AMD).

Read more

Chromebooks Gain Important Features, Appear to Be Here to Stay

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Part of what's driving Chromebooks forward is that Google is on a rapid release cycle with Chrome OS. And, very importantly, Google has relaxed the fiercely cloud-centric vision it originally had for Chrome OS, so that applications for Chromebooks can be used offline.

Read more

Google Open-Sources Their AutoFDO Profile Toolchain

Filed under
Google
OSS

Google has open-sourced their toolchain for providing automatic feedback-directed optimizations from perf data profiles to what can be used by GCC and LLVM.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

GTK+ Gains Experimental Overlay Scrollbars

The overlay scrollbar work that was committed on Monday is about improving the scrolling experience for those using GTK+ applications from touch screens. This prototype widget allows for showing a scroll position indicator on touch screens while hiding the scrollbar -- it sounds similar to Ubuntu's GTK2/GTK3 overlay scrollbar support for Unity. Read more

3 Alternatives to the Adobe PDF Reader on Linux

Adobe has pulled the plug on supporting its PDF reader app for Linux. This should come as no surprise, as the last time Adobe Reader for Linux was updated came in May 2013. But until recently, you could at least download and install Reader on your Linux desktop machine. Now? You can’t. If you go to the Adobe Reader site, you’ll find the Linux installer is no longer available. Read more

How OpenStack powers the research at CERN

OpenStack has been in a production environment at CERN for more than a year. One of the people that has been key to implementing the OpenStack infrastructure is Tim Bell. He is responsible for the CERN IT Operating Systems and Infrastructure group which provides a set of services to CERN users from email, web, operating systems, and the Infrastructure-as-a-Service cloud based on OpenStack. Read more

WE’RE HOSTING AN OPENDAYLIGHT HACKFEST IN JAPAN!

The OpenDaylight Project has quickly grown to become a global community, with more than 250 contributors working to advance open SDN and NFV from all corners of the world. This includes 11 ambassadors worldwide and OpenDaylight User Groups (ODLUG) in six cities across three countries. We are excited to host our first OpenDaylight HackFest in Japan in less than two weeks, and the good news is that it’s free to attend. Read more