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Google

Chromebooks Are Spreading

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GNU
Linux
Gentoo
Google
  • Best Chromebooks for business 2017: Should I buy a Chromebook? Chromebook buying advice

    Instead of running Microsoft Windows or Mac OS X, Chromebooks support Google's Chrome operating system (OS), meaning that these machines are entirely internet and cloud-based.

    Good for those familiar with the Chrome web browser and the Google productivity suite (Docs, Sheets, Slides), not so good for those wanting to perform heavy duty tasks with external applications.

    But keep an open mind, if you're looking for a cheap laptop to perform internet-based tasks, such as emails or web browsing, the Chromebook could be a viable option or a great option for a second machine.

    Read on to find out the best Chromebooks for business...

  • Apple’s Devices Lose Luster in American Classrooms

    Apple is losing its grip on American classrooms, which technology companies have long used to hook students on their brands for life.

    Over the last three years, Apple’s iPads and Mac notebooks — which accounted for about half of the mobile devices shipped to schools in the United States in 2013 — have steadily lost ground to Chromebooks, inexpensive laptops that run on Google’s Chrome operating system and are produced by Samsung, Acer and other computer makers.

  • Apple Losing Out to Microsoft and Google in U.S. Classrooms [iophk: "weird-ass spin there in the title. Apple is really losing to Google, Microsoft is treading water instead."]

    According to research company Futuresource Consulting, in 2016 the number of devices in American classrooms that run iOS and macOS fell to third place behind both Google-powered laptops and Windows devices.

Google Summer of Code

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Google
OSS

Review: Google Pixel is Android at its best (if a little boring)

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Android
Google
Reviews

The Pixel’s designs have been divisive ever since the first batch of leaks hit the interwebs, but I’ve grown quite fond of it. Maybe it’s the fact that my ‘Really Blue’ (provided to us by Verizon, thanks folks) model is in fact so incredibly blue, but really I just think the two tone look stands out. It’s instantly recognizable if you’ve seen the phone before.

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Google's Upspin Debuts

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Google
OSS
  • Another option for file sharing

    Existing mechanisms for file sharing are so fragmented that people waste time on multi-step copying and repackaging. With the new project Upspin, we aim to improve the situation by providing a global name space to name all your files. Given an Upspin name, a file can be shared securely, copied efficiently without "download" and "upload", and accessed by anyone with permission from anywhere with a network connection.

  • Google Developing "Upspin" Framework For Naming/Sharing Files

    Google today announced an experimental project called Upspin that's aiming for next-generation file-sharing in a secure manner.

  • Google releases open source file sharing project 'Upspin' on GitHub

    Believe it or not, in 2017, file-sharing between individuals is not a particularly easy affair. Quite frankly, I had a better experience more than a decade ago sending things to friends and family using AOL Instant Messenger. Nowadays, everything is so fragmented, that it can be hard to share.

    Today, Google unveils yet another way to share files. Called "Upspin," the open source project aims to make sharing easier for home users. With that said, the project does not seem particularly easy to set up or maintain. For example, it uses Unix-like directories and email addresses for permissions. While it may make sense to Google engineers, I am dubious that it will ever be widely used.

  • Google devs try to create new global namespace

    Wouldn't it be nice if there was a universal and consistent way to give names to files stored on the Internet, so they were easy to find? A universal resource locator, if you like?

    The problem is that URLs have been clunkified, so Upspin, an experimental project from some Google engineers, offers an easier model: identifying files to users and paths, and letting the creator set access privileges.

Go 1.8 Release Notes

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Development
Google
  • Go 1.8 Release Notes

    The latest Go release, version 1.8, arrives six months after Go 1.7. Most of its changes are in the implementation of the toolchain, runtime, and libraries. There are two minor changes to the language specification. As always, the release maintains the Go 1 promise of compatibility. We expect almost all Go programs to continue to compile and run as before.

  • Go 1.8 Released With Various Performance Improvements

    Google today announced the release of the Go 1.8 programming language implementation that is coming with six months worth of features and changes.

    Go 1.8 has a few new 64-bit x86 instructions supported, Go 1.8 now uses its new compiler back-end on all architectures (with Go 1.7 their new compiler back-end was just used on 64-bit x86) and that should yield a 20~30% performance improvement for 32-bit ARM systems. But even x86 64-bit systems should see 0~10% performance improvements with Go 1.8.

Leftovers: Gaming

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Google

Chromebooks are Spreading Out in the Educational Market

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GNU
Linux
Google

In recent months, several prominent analysts have taken aim at media reports that have allegedly miscast how well Chromebooks--portable computers based on Google's Chrome OS platform--are doing in sales terms. "There has been a ton of misreporting as many lazy reporters and bloggers have characterized this as all sales, which it wasn't, or even consumer sales, which it most assuredly was not," Stephen Baker of the NPD Group, has told Computerworld, for example.

Chromebooks are actually a fast growing part of the portable computer market, though, and Chrome OS has become an entrenched operating system. Particularly in schools, these systems are making a difference, and now Asus and Acer are out with new models focused on the educational market.

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Remix OS: Is This the Droid You Were Looking For?

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GNU
Linux
Google
Reviews

Ever wanted to try Android on your PC but there weren’t any really usable projects? Now you can. Remix OS is an Android based operating system that’s designed to offer a full-fledged desktop PC-like experience. The developers have done a lot of work to implement many desktop-centric features such as multi-window multi-tasking. It offers a very familiar interface inspired by Windows, so the learning curve is not that steep. If you have used Android before, you will find yourself at home.

Remix OS is being developed by Jide Technologies, a company founded by three ex-Googlers, “with a mission to unlock the potential of Android in order to accelerate a new age of computing,” reads the “about us” page.

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FOSS From Google

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Google
OSS
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