Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Google

Google FOSS

Filed under
Google
OSS

Google open-sources Walt, a tool that measures lag for touch and voice commands

Filed under
Google
OSS

Google today talked for the first time about Walt, a piece of software that people can use to figure out how long it takes for a device to respond to touch or voice input. Google has been using Walt to do performance tests on Android devices and Chromebooks, and now the software is available under an open source Apache license on GitHub.

Read more

Acer Chromebook 14 arrives with aluminium chassis and 14-hour battery life

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gentoo
Google

PC MAKER Acer has unveiled the Chromebook 14, a premium-looking Chrome OS laptop that claims a MacBook-rivalling 14-hour battery life.

Acer, perhaps not best known for premium devices, added the aluminium-clad Chromebook 14 to its laptop line-up this week. This is Acer's first all-metal Chromebook, and the chassis with rounded corners weighs just 1.55kg.

Read more

First Casio Android Wear Watch Hits the Google Store at $499

Filed under
Android
Google

Back at CES 2016, held “way back” in January, Casio discretely announced their first Android Wear powered smartwatch. Simply dubbed the “Smart Outdoor Watch” the WSD-F10 is a rugged, outdoor-focused smartwatch that runs Android Wear, while also featuring some of its own party tricks, too. Running the latest version of Android Wear, the Casio Smart Outdoor Watch comes with all the same sort of features you’d find in a Moto 360, but it’s built out of stronger stuff than most Android Wear devices. Casio is very much marketing this to the sort of wearer that isn’t afraid to get their hands dirty or spend time outdoors.

Read more

Gorgeous Cub Linux 1.0 (Chromixium OS) Release Candidate Now Available

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

The Cub Linux (previously Chromixium OS) developers have just announced on their Twitter account that the RC (Release Candidate) build of the upcoming 1.0 version of the operating system is available for download.

Before we tell you what goodies have been shipped with the first Release Candidate builds of Cub Linux 1.0, we would like to remind those of you who are not in the loop that, earlier this year, the team announced the rename of the project to Cub Linux from Chromixium OS at the request of Google’s Trademark Enforcement Team.

Read more

Google Updates Android for Linux Kernel Flaw

Filed under
Android
Linux
Google

Facing multiple Android security challenges in March so far, Google is issuing an unprecedented mid-month emergency patch update. The emergency patch is not, however, related to reports of a new Stagefright flaw but, rather, is a known Linux kernel vulnerability that Google was scheduled to fix.

Read more

Maglev

Filed under
Google
OSS
  • Jump aboard our load balancing Maglev, Google tells devs

    Google will open-source its super-duper load balancing Maglev tool to developers – a move that will also bolster its own infrastructure developments.

    In a blog post Google said it has a history of building its own networking gear, "and perhaps unsurprisingly, we build our own network load balancers as well, which have been handling most of the traffic to Google services since 2008."

  • Google Shares Details of Its Software-Defined Load Balancer

    The Maglev software-defined load balancer, which runs on commodity Linux servers, has been critical to Google Cloud Platform for eight years, company says.

    As it's already done with other areas of its massive datacenter infrastructure, Google this week gave enterprises a peek at Maglev, the software-defined network load balancer the company has been using since 2008 to handle traffic to Google services.

    Maglev, like most of Google's networking systems, was built internally. But unlike Jupiter, the custom network fabric connecting Google's data centers, Maglev runs on commodity Linux servers and does not require any specialized rack deployment, Google said in a blog post describing the technology.

Chromebook/Google/Gentoo Security

Filed under
Gentoo
Google
Security
  • Google has doubled its bounty for a Chromebook hack to $100,000

    Google doubled the bounty it will pay for a successful exploit of its Chromebook laptop to $100,000, sweetening the pot in hopes of drawing more attention from security researchers.

    The larger reward is intended for someone who finds a persistent compromise of a Chromebook in guest mode, according to Google's security blog on Monday.

  • Google's Bug Bounty for a Chromebook Hack Rises to $100,000

    We've reported a few times on bug bounties--cash prizes offered by open source communities to anyone who finds key software bugs--ranging from bounties offered by Google (for the Chrome browser) and Mozilla. This open method of discovering security vulnerabilities has been embraced at Google, especially. In fact, Google has offered up as much as $1 million to people who identify key vulnerabilities in the Chrome browser.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.14-rc2

I'm back to my usual Sunday release schedule, and rc2 is out there in all the normal places. This was a fairly usual rc2, with a very quiet beginning of the week, and then most changes came in on Friday afternoon and Saturday (with the last few ones showing up Sunday morning). Normally I tend to dislike how that pushes most of my work into the weekend, but this time I took advantage of it, spending the quiet part of last week diving instead. Anyway, the only unusual thing worth noting here is that the security subsystem pull request that came in during the merge window got rejected due to problems, and so rc2 ends up with most of that security pull having been merged in independent pieces instead. Read more Also: Linux 4.14-rc2 Kernel Released

Manjaro Linux Phasing out i686 (32bit) Support

In a not very surprising move by the Manjaro Linux developers, a blog post was made by Philip, the Lead Developer of the popular distribution based off Arch Linux, On Sept. 23 that reveals that 32-bit support will be phased out. In his announcement, Philip says, “Due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community, we have decided to phase out the support of this architecture. The decision means that v17.0.3 ISO will be the last that allows to install 32 bit Manjaro Linux. September and October will be our deprecation period, during which i686 will be still receiving upgraded packages. Starting from November 2017, packaging will no longer require that from maintainers, effectively making i686 unsupported.” Read more

Korora 26 'Bloat' Fedora-based Linux distro available for download -- now 64-bit only

Fedora is my favorite Linux distribution, but I don't always use it. Sometimes I opt for an operating system that is based on it depending on my needs at the moment. Called "Korora," it adds tweaks, repositories, codecs, and packages that aren't found in the normal Fedora operating system. As a result, Korora deviates from Red Hat's strict FOSS focus -- one of the most endearing things about Fedora. While you can add all of these things to Fedora manually, Korora can save you time by doing the work for you. Read more

BackSlash Linux Olaf

While using BackSlash, I had two serious concerns. The first was with desktop performance. The Plasma-based desktop was not as responsive as I'm used to, in either test environment. Often times disabling effects or file indexing will improve the situation, but the desktop still lagged a bit for me. My other issue was the program crashes I experienced. The Discover software manager crashed on me several times, WPS crashed on start-up the first time on both machines, I lost the settings panel once along with my changes in progress. These problems make me think BackSlash's design may be appealing to newcomers, but I have concerns with the environment's stability. Down the road, once the developers have a chance to iron out some issues and polish the interface, I think BackSlash might do well targeting former macOS users, much the same way Zorin OS tries to appeal to former Windows users. But first, I think the distribution needs to stabilize a bit and squash lingering stability bugs. Read more