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Google

Google's New Parser

Filed under
Google
OSS

Google Summer of Code 2016

Filed under
Google
OSS
GNOME
  • Google Summer of Code 2016 Projects Announced

    Google announced this week the participating student projects for this year's Summer of Code.

  • GSoC 2016 at coala

    coala participates in this GSoC under the PSF umbrella. This year we got a stunning number of 8 GSoC projects just working with us.

  • GSoC 2016 is Starting at GNOME

    Dear GSoC Students, dear GNOME community – and especially dear rejected students,

    Google Summer of Code 2016 is starting. GNOME has accepted 21 students – we are thrilled to work with you people!

LLVM/Clang and Google

Filed under
Development
Google
BSD
  • RFC: EfficiencySanitizer

    We plan to build a suite of compiler-based dynamic instrumentation tools for analyzing targeted performance problems. These tools will all live under a new "EfficiencySanitizer" (or "esan") sanitizer umbrella, as they will share significant portions of their implementations.

  • Google Is Working On An Efficiency Sanitizer To Improve Performance Problems

    Derek Bruening of Google has announced the company's interest in creating an "Efficiency Sanitizer" for LLVM/Clang for analyzing targeted performance problems.

    Worked on Google and other compoanies have been Address Sanitizer, Memory Sanitizer, Thread Sanitizer, Leak Sanitizer, Data Flow Sanitizer, and other sanitizers found in LLVM/Clang some of which have also been ported to GCC. These sanitizers have been incredibly helpful for developers in catching various problems within program code-bases, including many security issues. The latest focus being pursued by Google's compiler engineers is on an Efficiency Sanitizer.

Google FOSS

Filed under
Google
OSS

Google open-sources Walt, a tool that measures lag for touch and voice commands

Filed under
Google
OSS

Google today talked for the first time about Walt, a piece of software that people can use to figure out how long it takes for a device to respond to touch or voice input. Google has been using Walt to do performance tests on Android devices and Chromebooks, and now the software is available under an open source Apache license on GitHub.

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Acer Chromebook 14 arrives with aluminium chassis and 14-hour battery life

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gentoo
Google

PC MAKER Acer has unveiled the Chromebook 14, a premium-looking Chrome OS laptop that claims a MacBook-rivalling 14-hour battery life.

Acer, perhaps not best known for premium devices, added the aluminium-clad Chromebook 14 to its laptop line-up this week. This is Acer's first all-metal Chromebook, and the chassis with rounded corners weighs just 1.55kg.

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First Casio Android Wear Watch Hits the Google Store at $499

Filed under
Android
Google

Back at CES 2016, held “way back” in January, Casio discretely announced their first Android Wear powered smartwatch. Simply dubbed the “Smart Outdoor Watch” the WSD-F10 is a rugged, outdoor-focused smartwatch that runs Android Wear, while also featuring some of its own party tricks, too. Running the latest version of Android Wear, the Casio Smart Outdoor Watch comes with all the same sort of features you’d find in a Moto 360, but it’s built out of stronger stuff than most Android Wear devices. Casio is very much marketing this to the sort of wearer that isn’t afraid to get their hands dirty or spend time outdoors.

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Gorgeous Cub Linux 1.0 (Chromixium OS) Release Candidate Now Available

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

The Cub Linux (previously Chromixium OS) developers have just announced on their Twitter account that the RC (Release Candidate) build of the upcoming 1.0 version of the operating system is available for download.

Before we tell you what goodies have been shipped with the first Release Candidate builds of Cub Linux 1.0, we would like to remind those of you who are not in the loop that, earlier this year, the team announced the rename of the project to Cub Linux from Chromixium OS at the request of Google’s Trademark Enforcement Team.

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More in Tux Machines

Command Line: FFmpeg, Coinmon, Tizonia

  • FFmpeg Lands OpenCL Improvements
    Besides a lot of NVDEC code landing for the next FFmpeg release, there's also been a number of OpenCL improvements that were just committed to this multimedia library's codebase. The work landed yesterday includes removing an older and experimental OpenCL API while introducing a new OpenCL "hwcontext" implementation. This in turn has introduced an OpenCL overlay filter and OpenCL unsharp mask filter.
  • Coinmon – Check Cryptocurrency Prices From Commandline
    A while ago, we published a guide about Cli-Fyi – a potentially useful command line query tool. Using Cli-Fyi, we can easily find out the latest price of a cryptocurrency and lots of other useful details. Today, we are going to see yet another cryptcurrency price checker tool called “Coinmon”. Unlike Cli.Fyi, Coinmon is only for checking the price of various cryptocurrencies. Nothing more! Coinmon will check cryptocurrencies’ prices, changes right from your Terminal. It will fetch all details from from coinmarketcap.com APIs. It is quite useful for those who are both Crypto investors and Engineers.
  • Command Line Music Player for Spotify, YouTube & Other Music Streaming Services
    Tizonia is a command-line music player that let you stream music from Spotify, Google Play Music, YouTube, Soundcloud, and more, straight from the terminal.

OSS: Configuration Management, Man(ual), Patent Traps (5G and the Internet of Things), Sponsored Development

  • 9 Excellent Open Source Configuration Management Applications
    End users at public and private sector organizations sometimes perceive IT teams a barrier to the development of the business. When the business demands new services and applications, it may take months before progress is made. Why is that? It’s too common for IT teams to spend too much time fighting fires; after all they can come from so many different sources. An IT team’s main responsibility is to maintain, secure, and operate an organization’s systems and networks. This, in itself, carries a huge responsibility. IT teams that maintain technology infrastructure, deploy applications, and provisioning environments with many manual tasks are inefficient. In modern environments, services are rarely deployed in isolation. Simple applications may need several services to run – such as a web server and a database. Deploying more complex systems, many services may need installing, configuring, and linked together. Streamlining system administration must therefore be part of an IT solution. And one of the most time-consuming activity for IT teams is the management of the business’s infrastructure. Automation minimizes manual work, reducing the risk of human mistakes, and offering the ability to quickly deploy new services and applications without risking reliability. Whether it involves container orchestration, real-time big data, deep learning, or stream processing, large software demands operations to be automated. Here’s where configuration management system software steps in. This software automates the configuration of machines to a particular state. Like any other tools, they are designed to solve specific problems in certain ways. The goal is to get a system from whatever state it is in, into the desired state. Configuration management software are the tools of choice for many system administrators and devops professionals. Cloud platforms enable teams to deploy and maintain applications serving thousands of users, and the leading open source configuration management tools offer ways to automate the various processes.
  • 'Gimme Gimme Gimme' Easter egg in man breaks automated tests at 00:30
    The maintainer of the Linux manual program man has scrapped an "Easter egg" after it broke a user's automatic code tests. On Tuesday, Unix systems administrator Jeff Schaller wrote in a Stack Exchange post: "We've noticed that some of our automatic tests fail when they run at 00:30 but work fine the rest of the day. They fail with the message 'gimme gimme gimme' in stderr, which wasn't expected."
  • Open source and standards – The path towards 5G and the Internet of Things
    Following the success of last year’s event, the 2nd workshop “Open Source and Standards – The Path Towards 5G and the Internet of Things”, jointly organised by NGMN and the ITU, took place on 1st November 2017 in Bellevue (Seattle), Washington, USA. The workshop was hosted by Microsoft and co-organised by the IPR Plenary of the NGMN Alliance and the International Telecommunication Union. Bringing together key representatives of a wide range of industry, including standards bodies, open source communities and academia, the discussions focused on how best standard-setting organisations and open source communities can capitalise upon each other’s deliverables and expertise for building a consistent and coherent 5G eco-system. With more than 100 participants, the workshop discussed how diverse stakeholders can rely on the respective strengths and development models to place a broad range of industries in a strong position to achieve the common vision for 5G and beyond.
  • Sponsored development is a win-win for users and developers
    There is a myth that simply by making a software platform open source, qualified people will give up their nights and weekends to contribute to its development. With rare exceptions, that's not how the open source world works. Building a community of contributors takes time, and complex applications often have a steep learning curve before a developer becomes comfortable working with the code. Open source software companies are the fuel behind a lot of software development, forming the communities and providing the financial backing that support it. And, like any other type of business, open source software companies need to earn money to stay in business.

Games: GameShell, GOG, Oxygen Not Included and More

Linux 4.15 Will Treat The HTC Vive VR Headset As "Non-Desktop"

Currently if plugging in the HTC Vive for a virtual reality experience on Linux, the head-mounted display (HMD) is treated just as a conventional display. But now with a new set of changes for Linux 4.15, the kernel will know it's a "non-desktop" display. Besides the DRM leasing support that has already landed during the Linux 4.15 merge window with the main DRM pull request, David Airlie has sent in another pull today for further benefiting SteamVR with Linux 4.15. (And among other benefits, also the AMDGPU priority scheduling landed too for 4.15 as another benefit for VR Linux gaming when using AMD graphics.) Read more