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Google

Open source challenger takes on Google Translate

Filed under
Google
OSS

Researchers have released an open source neural network system for performing language translations that could be an alternative to proprietary, black-box translation services.

Open Source Neural Machine Translation (OpenNMT) merges work from researchers at Harvard with contributions from long-time machine-translation software creator Systran. It runs on the Torch scientific computing framework, which is also used by Facebook for its machine learning projects.

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Google Releases Test Set to Check Cryptographic Library Security

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Google
Security

Google has released a set of tests that developers can use to check some open source cryptographic libraries for known security vulnerabilities.

The company has named the set of tests Project Wycheproof, after a mountain in Australia, which has the distinction of being the world's smallest registered mountain.

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Also: Project Wycheproof

2017: The year Linux will reach 5% market share

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Ah, 2016. A year many of us would like to forget as quickly as possible. One way to make that happen is to hit the ground running in 2017. This is exactly what I believe open source will do.

I can hear it already.

"Doesn't every open source pundit declare the coming year will be the years of Linux?"

Certainly they do, and that won't change from year to year. And 2017 will not see me backing down from such claim. However, I do believe the writing has become ever more clear on that massive wall of IT.

Linux is a crucial player on almost every level now. How will that change in 2017? Will it ebb or flow? Let's gaze into that crystal ball that I absolutely do not have and see what there is to see or not see. Some of these prognostications will tiptoe toward madness, while others will have you immediately nodding your head in agreement.

Are you ready? Here we go.

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Cloud Foundry Foundation Gets Google

Filed under
Server
Google
OSS

Google joins the open source Cloud Foundry Foundation

Filed under
Google
OSS

Google is joining the Cloud Foundry Foundation as a Gold member. To be fair, this doesn’t necessarily come as a major surprise, especially given that Google recently hired the foundation’s former CEO Sam Ramji.

Other Cloud Foundry Gold-level members include Accenture, Allstate, CenturyLink, Huawai, Phillips and Verizon. It’s worth noting that Google — unlike Cisco, IBM, SAP and others — didn’t opt for the highest level of sponsorship (platinum), though.

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Google makes 'Embedding Projector' an open source project

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Google
OSS

Data can be highly valuable, and no company knows that more than Google. It is constantly collecting a massive amount of it -- it is pretty much how the company butters its bread. Data only has value when it can be used, however, meaning it must ultimately tell a story. In other words, collecting it is only the beginning.

One of the best way to digest and present data is with visualizations and dashboards. Not everyone is a data scientist, so how you tell a story matters. Today, Google is making a rather nifty data visualization tool an open source project. Called "Embedding Projector", it can show what the search giant calls "high-dimensional data".

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OpenShift and Google

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
Google
  • Red Hat launches 'OpenShift' dedicated on Google Cloud Platform

    World's leading provider of open source solutions Red Hat has announced the general availability of OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform.

  • Red Hat and Google join forces on containers

    Red Hat and Google are set to offer enterprise customers a managed OpenShift service hosted on Google's cloud to make the build, launch and management of applications a less time-consuming process.

    OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform will speed up the adoption of containers, according to Red Hat, giving developers the guidance they need to create applications and deploy them faster.

  • Red Hat’s Container Platform Lands on Google Cloud

    Red Hat’s OpenShift Dedicated container platform will now be available on Google Cloud Platform, the companies announced yesterday.

    OpenShift Dedicated is a managed version of Red Hat’s OpenShift container platform, targeting enterprises. Launched in December, the Dedicated version puts Red Hat in the role of a service provider, taking care of infrastructure and operations.

Chromium/Chrome News

Filed under
Google
Web
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More in Tux Machines

KDE/Qt: Qt 3D, Kube/Kolab, GSoC, and Atelier (3-D Printing)

  • What a mesh!
    With all the advances being made in Qt 3D, we wanted to create some new examples showing some of what it can do. To get us started, we decided to use an existing learning framework, so we followed the open source Tower Defence course, which you can find at CGCookie. Being a game, it allows an interactive view of everything at work, which is very useful.
  • Last week in Kube
    Perhaps if Windows wasn’t such a PITA there would be more progress
  • GSoC 2018: Week 4 & 5
    The last 2 weeks were mainly dedicatd for reviews and testing and thanks to my mentors, I passed the first evaluation with good work till now. Some significant changes were made on discussion with my mentors during the last 2 weeks in the code and some new features.
  • Giving Atelier some Love
    I work for atelier together with Chris, Lays and Patrick for quite a while, but I was basically being the “guardian angel” of the project being invocked when anything happened or when they did not know how to proceed (are you a guardian angel of a project? we have many that need that) For instance I’v done the skeleton for the plugin system, the buildsystem and some of the modules in the interface, but nothing major as I really lacked the time and also lacked a printer.

Proprietary Software on GNU/Linux

  • Winepak – Install Windows Apps and Games on Linux via Flatpak
    A reason for Linux not being more used as added in the comments section of a recent article is “Adobe and Games“. Well, there is a latest Linux bad guy in town and it is here to comfort us in a cooler way than Wine.
  • Mark Text Markdown Editor Adds Sidebar And Tabs Support
    Mark Text is a somewhat new free and open source Electron Markdown editor for Windows, Mac and Linux, which supports the CommonMark Spec and the GitHub Flavored Markdown Spec. The app features a seamless live preview using Snabbdom as the render engine, multiple edit modes (Typewriter, Source Code and Focus), includes code fence support, light and drak themes, emoji auto-completion, and export to PDF, HTML or styled HTML.
  • Google’s VR180 Creator Makes It Easier to Edit VR Video on Linux
    It’s called “VR180 Creator” (catchy) and the tool aims to make it easier for people to edit video shot on 180-degree and 360-degree devices like the Lenovo Mirage camera (pictured opposite). And boy is just-such a tool needed! VR180 Creator: Easier VR Video Editing Editing VR video is, to be perfectly frank, a pain in the rump end. So by releasing this new, open-source tool for free Google is being rather smart.Anything that makes it easier for consumers and content creators to edit VR on something other than a high-end specialist rig is going to help the format flourish.

Devuan GNU+Linux 2.0.0 "ASCII"

When I am trying out a desktop distribution, what really tends to divide the field of Linux distributions in my mind is not whether the system uses MATE or Plasma, or whether the underlying package manager uses RPM or Deb files. What tends to leave a lasting impression with me is whether the desktop environment, its applications and controls feel like a cooperative, cohesive experience or like a jumble of individual tools that happen to be part of the same operating system. In my opinion Ubuntu running the Unity desktop and Linux Mint's Cinnamon desktop are good examples of the cohesive approach. The way openSUSE's administration tools work together provides another example. Like them or hate them, I think most people can see there is an overall design, a unifying vision, being explored with those distributions. I believe Devuan falls into the other category, presenting the user with a collection of utilities and features where some assembly is still required. This comes across in little ways. For example, many distributions ship Mozilla's Firefox web browser and the Thunderbird e-mail client together as a set, and they generally complement each other. Devuan ships Firefox, but then its counterpart is the mutt console e-mail program which feels entirely out of place with the rest of the desktop software. The PulseAudio sound mixing utility is included, but its system tray companion is not present by default. Even the system installer, which switches back and forth between graphical windows and a text console, feels more like a collection of uncoordinated prompts rather than a unified program or script. Some people may like the mix-and-match approach, but I tend to prefer distributions where it feels like the parts are fitted together to create a unified experience. What I found was that Devuan provided an experience where I had to stop and think about where items were or how I was going to use them rather than having the pieces seamlessly fit together. However, once I got the system set up in a way that was more to my liking, I appreciated the experience provided. Devuan offers a stable, flexible platform. Once I shaped the operating system a little, I found it to be fast, light and capable. Having a fairly large repository of software available along with Flatpak support provided a solid collection of applications on a conservative operating system foundation. It was a combination I liked. In short, I think Devuan has some rough edges and setting it up was an unusually long and complex experience by Linux standards. I certainly wouldn't recommend Devuan to newcomers. However, a day or two into the experience, Devuan's stability and performance made it a worthwhile journey. I think Devuan may be a good alternative to people who like running Debian or other conservative distributions such as Slackware. I suspect I may soon be running Devuan's Raspberry Pi build on my home server where its lightweight nature will be welcome. Read more Also: deepin 15.6 Released With New Features: Get This Beautiful Linux Distro Here

Android Leftovers