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Review: 6 business-class Chromebooks test their mettle

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

I've spent the last three weeks taking six business-oriented Chromebooks through their paces. I started out as a skeptical Windows-rules-them-all kind of guy: I've been using Windows since the early days, and I've rarely strayed from the ghosts of my Windows masters. By the end of my Chromebook experiment, however, my old biases were shaken.

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Is Google coming back to the open community on document formats?

Filed under
LibO
Google
OOo

At the ODF Plugfest in London, Google’s head of open source told the audience that work once once again in progress extending OpenDocument support in Google’s products.

At the opening of the event, Magnus Falk, deputy CTO for HM Government, told the audience that the decision to adopt ODF (alongside HTML and PDF) as the government’s required document format is now well in hand. When asked by an audience member about various government agencies that currently require submissions from the public in Microsoft-only formats, Falk said that all such departments must make a migration plan now for how they will achieve use of the required formats.

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Google's Massive New Android Update Is Coming To The Galaxy S5

Filed under
Android
Google

Samsung's flagship smartphone will soon be getting the latest version of Android, which Google has been calling its biggest mobile software update yet.

Android 5.0 Lollipop is now available for Galaxy S5 owners in Poland, blog Sam Mobile first reported, which suggests a broader rollout isn't too far away.

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Android Circuit: Galaxy S6 Leaks, Google's Best Android Games From 2014, Lollipop's Big Review

Filed under
Android
Google
Reviews

Taking a look back at the week in news across the Android world, this week’s Android Circuit highlights a number of stories including leaks around Samsung’s 2015 flagship, J. K. Shin stays in charge at Samsung’s Mobile Division, Lollipop reviewed in-depth as it arrives on the Galaxy S5 in Poland, comparing the ‘mini’ handsets, interviewing the Russian behind the smartphone with two screens, will bloatware arrive over-the-air, Chrome’s hidden reading mode, and the best Google Play Apps and Games.

Android Circuit is here to remind you of a few of the many things that have happened around Android over the last seven days (and you can read the weekly Apple news digest here).

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Google quietly pushes out Android Lollipop 5.0.1 images

Filed under
Android
Google

After a less-than-smooth rollout three weeks after it began to roll out Android Lollipop to users, Google has begun the process of getting Lollipop 5.0.1 out the door.

The Android maker quietly updated its factory images page to reveal a 5.0.1 build for the Nexus 9, Nexus 7, and Nexus 10. Installing images from this page does require the flashing of devices in order to update them, and does not carry user data across in the process, unless backed up and restored by the user.

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Chrome 40 Beta: Powerful Offline and Lightspeed Loading with Service Workers

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Google

The newest Chrome Beta channel release includes several new developer features to help you make richer, more compelling web content and apps, especially for mobile devices. Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to Chrome for Android, Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome OS.

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Google Chromebooks Outsell iPads in U.S. Schools

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Chromebooks from vendors such as Acer, HP, Samsung and Dell edged out iPads in sales to U.S. schools during the third quarter, according to new data from IDC.
Google's low-cost Chromebook laptops have for the first time overtaken Apple's iPads in sales to U.S. schools.

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Raspberry Pi and Coder by Google for beginners and kids

Filed under
Linux
Google

Coder is a fantastic resource for learning programming. It simplifies the process of getting started, requires very inexpensive components, and provides fun and engaging activities. If you are planning on gettting a Raspberry Pi for the holidays, (or already have one), Coder is a great addition to get extra fun and learning from that little board.

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How Google Employs Open Source Solutions For Cross-Platform App Development

Filed under
Google
OSS

In the apps economy, Google has two distinct identities: it is the provider of the largest and most used global platform with Android and it is one of the leading app publishers for all platforms.

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What’s the Difference Between Chromium and Chrome?

Filed under
Google

On Linux, Chromium can often be installed directly from your Linux distribution’s software repositories. On Ubuntu Linux, for example, it can be installed by opening the Ubuntu Software Center, searching for Chromium, and clicking Install. It will be updated with security updates from your Linux distribution’s software repositories.

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu vs. Fedora Linux On Lenovo's X1 Carbon With Core i7 Broadwell

The latest distribution I tried on the X1 Carbon (and the OS I'll ultimately use for running the X1 Carbon in a production capacity as my main system) is Fedora 21. Fedora 21 booted up on the X1 Carbon wonderfully without any issues aside from the trackpoint button clicks being wonky (though the button clicks in the corner of the trackpad works fine). Fedora 21 with Wayland also ran fine on this system with Intel HD Graphics 5500. Overall, it was a pleasant experience without any major problems. Read more

Plex Media Server Review – The Ultimate Steaming Server

Plex Media Server is a media center application that allows users to stream video and audio content to local and remote clients, such as mobile devices or smart TVs. We now take a closer look at this powerful server and client and see what's the fuss all about. Read more

CoreOS Co-Founder Alex Polvi Talks Containers, Rocket vs. Docker, and More

CoreOS has gained notoriety over the past few years as the creator of a new Linux distribution designed for massive, Google-scale server deployments. The company's star has risen along with the popularity of Linux containers -- a key component of CoreOS -- and their open source components are being widely incorporated by companies on the bleeding edge of distributed computing. Read more

Linux vs Windows

I've been working with both Linux and MS Windows 7 lately. Yes, I have a good excuse for using MS Windows: I have started working on Ruby video tutorials, and I needed to demonstrate installation of ruby, notepad++, and configuration thereof in the MS Windows environment. Well, it's been illuminating, switching back and forth between Kubuntu 14.10 and Microsoft Windows 7. The desktops are pretty much equal. However, Linux KDE has stolen a march on the Windows 7 desktop regarding configurability of the desktop experience--of course, I'm vastly more experienced with Linux and the KDE desktop. Also, Linux is better on multitasking. Often, MS Windows 7 would almost freeze a few moments when working on several tasks. I also had some issues getting my sound card working well with Windows 7--which is an older sound-blaster (5.1) card. But, I've had similar problems with getting audio in the Linux environment working too. However, the online help and assistance you can get with Linux seems much better. Purchasing a screen recorder and a basic video editor with MS Windows 7 was also interesting. Although reading countless reviews, I had a difficult time getting a cheap screen recorder that was good on both the video and audio portions of screen recording, and would work properly on 1920x1080 recordings. And all the "free stuff" you download for Microsoft Windows is cripple ware. The Windows software environment is based on deception: "It's Free!". After downloading and installing, you find it won't do nearly what you wanted until you send them $xx.xx! I almost bought "Camtasia Studio", which, by all accounts, is good screen recording and editing software. But I couldn't justify spending $299.99 on software I was only going to use for producing 10 minutes of video demonstration. I know the preceding paragraph seems somewhat naive, but after using only Linux for so long, I haven't faced anything like this for many years. The one good thing to say about MS Windows 7 is that Notepad++ is a good "totally freeware" text editor. The remainder of the video tutorial series will be done solely in Linux--with Kdenlive 0.9.10 (where I finally learned to do "Pan and Zoom") and SimpleScreenRecorder 0.3.3. I'm going to send both of them a few $$. It's good to be back.