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Google

Google Gives iOS Devs Open Source EarlGrey Testing Tool

Filed under
Google
OSS

Google last week introduced EarlGrey, a functional user interface testing framework for Apple iOS apps.

YouTube, Google Calendar, Google Photos, Google Translate and Google Play Music have successfully adopted the framework, the company said.

EarlGrey has been open sourced under the Apache license, according to Google's Siddartha Janga. The company has provided app developers with a start guide and the ability to add EarlGrey to their projects using CocoaPods or to add it manually to Xcode project files.

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Google/ChromeOS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • Revisiting The Google Pixel C - Better, But Not There Yet
  • Is Google's Pixel C worth buying?

    A writer at AnandTech did a full review of Google's Pixel C a while back, but now he's gotten a more up to date unit from the company. Has the Pixel C gotten better than when it was first reviewed? Or does Google still have room for significant improvements?

  • Neverware Brings Windows Into Its Anti-Aging Fold

    The heart of the CloudReady OS is the Chromium OS, Google's open source version of the Chrome OS.

  • Experimenting with Hardware

    The computer turned on with absolute disregard of my fears. After pretty much the same lines that Linux shows upon start, my familiar GRUB2 greeted me, asking if I wanted to boot Mageia, PCLinuxOS, OpenMandriva, or Windows XP (the OS that I haven't booted in maybe three years).

  • Google to shut down Play for Education in March

    Google has been running a small segment of its Play Store designed specifically for educational users for the past two years, as part of the tech giant’s efforts to increase tablet adoption in schools. However, the Play for Education initiative will be coming to an end sometime next month, as there simply isn’t that much demand for the service.

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Google
  • Plex Media Server on the Raspberry Pi 2 – Joy and Anguish

    Over the years, I have been collecting DVDs, backing up the movies to a desktop computer for playback on its big screen. Recently, projects like Kodi and Plex media server came along and promised to not only offer those same movies in a pleasing GUI, but to gather metadata about the movies and to save my place when I access them from different places. I would love to have a dedicated server so I don’t need to continuously run my desktop computer, but I’m too cheap to spring for a dedicated NAS. The raspberry pi 2 promises an easy way to accomplish this goal without first having to earn a degree in computer science.

  • App: CalPlus for Samsung Z1 and Z3 Tizen Smartphone

    CalPlus for Tizen smartphones like the Samsung Z1 and Z3 is a financial calculator. Actually no it isn’t, in-fact it is a set of financial calculators that lets you do some crazy financial number wizardry.

  • Samsung Z1 Tizen 2.4 Firmware / Software update hits Bangladesh

    The Z1 originally launched with Tizen 2.3, but following the launch of the Tizen 2.4 Beta Software Test Program in India, users have been looking forward to getting the final Tizen 2.4 release for their device. The Z1 has currently been released in several countries including India, Bangladesh, Nepal and Sri Lanka. There is no Information at present when the latter mentioned countries will get this update.

  • Shashlik 0.9 Released For Running Android Apps On Linux

    Shashlik is the KDE-aligned project for running Android apps on Linux outside of a traditional Android environment. A new version of this open-source project is now available.

Google and IBM Openwashing

Filed under
Google
OSS

District goes digital, with one laptop for every student

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

The ConVal School District will provide every middle school and high school student a Chromebook laptop by the 2017-18 school year, as textbooks, homework and lessons all go digital.

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Also: Another USAian School District Goes To ChromeBooks

How schools around the country are turning dead Microsoft PCs into speedy Chromebooks

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

The Ovid-Elsie school district sits an hour west of Flint, Michigan, the city now notorious for being poisoned by its own penny-pinching administrators. The district, which serves roughly 1,600 students, is one of the poorer areas in the state, with a per capita income of just over $15,000. "We’re looking at close to three-quarters of our kids [who] are classified as economically disadvantaged here," said Kris Kirby, the district’s assistant superintendent. So when it came time to find computer equipment for every classroom, Ovid-Elsie had to get creative.

The school was eager to experiment with Google Chromebooks, which have been sweeping the education market. But even those machines cost several hundred dollars each, far too much for Ovid-Elsie to afford one for every student. Dan Davenport, the director of technology for the area schools, had looked into using Chromium, the open-source version of Google’s Chrome operating system, but was stymied by the complexity of supporting a range of different drivers on a mishmash of old computers.

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Go 1.6 and Development by Women

Filed under
Development
Google
  • Go 1.6 is released

    Today we release Go version 1.6, the seventh major stable release of Go. You can grab it right now from the download page. Although the release of Go 1.5 six months ago contained dramatic implementation changes, this release is more incremental.

    The most significant change is support for HTTP/2 in the net/http package. HTTP/2 is a new protocol, a follow-on to HTTP that has already seen widespread adoption by browser vendors and major websites. In Go 1.6, support for HTTP/2 is enabled by default for both servers and clients when using HTTPS, bringing the benefits of the new protocol to a wide range of Go projects, such as the popular Caddy web server.

  • Go 1.6 Released
  • Women write better open source code on GitHub than men [Ed: conveniently (and wrongly) concludes from that it’s FOSS (not CS) that discriminates against women]

    Woman may be more competent than men at writing code but still there is evidence that they are discriminated against in open source communities because they are women.

  • A New Study Suggests That Women Write Better Code Than Men

    A recent study conducted by researchers from the computer science departments at Cal Poly, San Luis, Obispo and North Carolina State University reports that women write better code than men.

  • If Women Are Better at Coding, It’s Because They Have to Be

I bought my mom a Chromebook Pixel and everything is so much better now

Filed under
Linux
Google

The problem: most of the Chromebooks on the market feel cheap. They're generally marketed as secondary computers, so they're made to be inexpensive, and that means almost all of them are made of cheap-feeling plastic. There's nothing wrong with that, but I needed to pass the sleek test. The only viable option was Google's own Chromebook Pixel, which is an amazingly beautiful machine that's ridiculously expensive by most normal standards, because it's a thousand-dollar computer that just runs Chrome. It sounds insane: most tech products that cost a thousand dollars do many, many more things than simply running a web browser. I spent weeks tossing the idea around every chance I got, just to see if it would ever sound less like I was slowly going crazy.

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Google peddles Linux based load balancer to open sourcers

Filed under
Linux
Google
OSS

Google has developed an open source infrastructure software build using its Go language.

The ad-flinger has released the Seesaw load balancer for Linux, built to replace two existing systems.

Code has been released to GitHub here.

Google’s site reliability engineer, Joel Sing, blogged that Seesaw would increase the availability of service and reduce the management overhead.

“We are pleased to be able to make this platform available to the rest of the world and hope that other enterprises will be able to benefit,” Sing wrote.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • FLOSS Weekly 389: Best Practices Badge
  • OpenGL 4.5 For The Intel Mesa Driver May Be Imminent
    Intel has been rapidly advancing their OpenGL 4.x support and OpenGL 4.5 is even in sight now. Kristian Høgsberg today landed GL_KHR_robustness support in the i965 DRI driver, a requirement for OpenGL 4.5.
  • Shotwell vs. digiKam
    How to manage your photos? – That is probably the biggest question for anyone doing anything with a photo camera. As resolutions of cameras grow, the data we have to manage is growing ever. In my case I am talking about more than 50000 photos and videos measuring up to about 200Gb of disk space, constantly growing. There are several photo management softwares out there, I guess the most commonly used ones are Shotwell for the Gnome desktop, digiKam for the KDE world, and FotoXX. I have not used Shotwell and digiKam for quite some time, and collect here my experiences of strength and weaknesses of the two programs. FotoXX seems to be very powerful, too, but I haven’t tested it till now.
  • Tweet your database with db2twitter
    db2twitter is developed by and run for LinuxJobs.fr, the job board of th french-speaking Free Software and Opensource community.
  • Tiny Core Linux 7.1 Screenshot Tour
  • Annoying myths about Linux that won't go away
    Linux has been around for many years, and has gotten better and better as time has gone by. Yet there are some enduring, inaccurate, and annoying myths about Linux that persist to this day. A Linux redditor started a thread about Linux myths and got some interesting responses from his fellow Linux users:
  • GStreamer Spring Hackfest 2016
    After missing the last few GStreamer hackfests I finally managed to attend this time. It was held in Thessaloniki, Greece’s second largest city. The city is located by the sea side and the entire hackfest and related activities were either directly by the sea or just a couple blocks away.
  • My talk at OSDC 2016: Continuous Integration in Data Centers – Further 3 Years Later
  • Isenkram with PackageKit support - new version 0.23 available in Debian unstable
    The isenkram system is a user-focused solution in Debian for handling hardware related packages. The idea is to have a database of mappings between hardware and packages, and pop up a dialog suggesting for the user to install the packages to use a given hardware dongle. Some use cases are when you insert a Yubikey, it proposes to install the software needed to control it; when you insert a braille reader list it proposes to install the packages needed to send text to the reader; and when you insert a ColorHug screen calibrator it suggests to install the driver for it. The system work well, and even have a few command line tools to install firmware packages and packages for the hardware already in the machine (as opposed to hotpluggable hardware).

today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: KDE (Akonadi, KWin)

  • Akonadi for e-mail needs to die
    So, I'm officially giving up on kmail2 (i.e., the Akonadi-based version of kmail) on the last one of my PCs now. I have tried hard and put in a lot of effort to get it working, but it costs me a significant amount of time and effort just to be able to receive and read e-mail - meaning hanging IMAP resources every few minutes, the feared "Multiple merge candidates" bug popping up again and again, and other surprise events. That is plainly not acceptable in the workplace, where I need to rely on e-mail as means of communication. By leaving kmail2 I seem to be following many many other people... Even dedicated KDE enthusiasts that I know have by now migrated to Trojita or Thunderbird.
  • Virtual keyboard support in KWin/Wayland 5.7
    Over the last weeks I worked on improved input device support in KWin/Wayland and support for virtual keyboard. KWin 5.7 will integrate the new QtVirtualKeyboard module which is now available under GPLv3. For us this means that we have access to a high quality QML based keyboard. For Qt it means that the virtual keyboard is exposed to more users and thanks to the open source nature it means that we can upstream fixes.
  • Virtual Keyboard Support For KWin / KDE Wayland 5.7
    The latest KWin/Wayland hacking project by Martin Gräßlin is adding virtual keyboard support to KWin for the upcoming KDE Plasma 5.7 release. This virtual keyboard support is powered by the QtVirtualKeyboard module and provides a high-quality, QML-based keyboard that will work on KWin/Wayland when no hardware keyboard is available. Implementing this virtual keyboard support with Wayland compatibility was actually quite a feat, but has now become a reality thanks to the work by Martin.