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Google

Announcing Dart 2.8

Filed under
Development
Google

Today we’re announcing a new release of the Dart SDK, version 2.8. We’re continuing to see amazing growth in the Dart community; we now have millions of Flutter developers using Dart as their client-optimized language for building fast apps on any platform. While we’re still working hard on completing our upcoming null safety feature to make Dart an even more optimized language for building fast and stable user interfaces, we have a few exciting new features focused on making developers even more productive when managing dependencies.
The Dart platform comes with built-in support for package management via the pub client tool and the pub.dev package repository, which has grown 200% over the past year and now is home to nearly 10,000 packages. As part of our ongoing work to improve the Dart ecosystem, the Dart 2.8 SDK brings two improvements to the pub client tool: much better performance in pub get, and a new tool for ensuring your package dependencies are kept up-to-date.
Dart 2.8 also brings a set of small breaking changes in the Dart language and libraries. These changes lay the groundwork for our first version of the null safety feature.

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Also: Google's Dart Language Reaches 2.8 Milestone With New Features

KDE's Google Summer of Code Students

Filed under
Development
KDE
Google
  • Krita: Presenting Our Google Summer of Code Students!

    It’s that time of the year again! Google has published the names of the students who will be allowed to work on open source of free software, and who will receive a stipend from Google. And like last year, this year we are mentoring four students!

    Sharaf Zaman is a veteran from last year, when he ported Krita to Android. In fact, over the past couple of weeks he’s been busy putting Krita in the Google Play Store, in the beta track. Apart from some administrative worries, we’re ready to publish that! This year, he will implement a new kind of gradients: mesh gradients. Here is his project proposal. Mesh gradients were first implemented in Inkscape, and now we’re going for a second, independent implementation.

    [...]

    Ashwin Dhakaita will be integrating the MyPaint brush library in Krita as a new brush engine. Once upon a time Krita did have a MyPaint brush engine, but the MyPaint developers dropped their existing integration support and created a new library. But these days many more applications use the mypaint brush library, meaning that integrating it is much safer. Here is his project proposal.

  • Open Letter to KDE GSoC Students We Could Not Accept

    I no longer have access to your proposal or emails, thus the open letter on my blog.

    If you allowed commenting before the student proposal deadline, I along with other admins and mentors tried to help you improve your proposal. Some of you took the suggestions and sharpened your presentation, fleshed out your timeline and in general created a proposal you can be proud of.

    If you did not allow commenting or only uploaded your proposal right before the deadline, you missed out on this mentoring opportunity, and for that I am sorry. That cut us off from a vital communication link with you.

    This proposal process, along with fixing some bugs and creating some commits mean that you have real experience you can take with you into the future
    . I hope you also learned how to use IRC/Matrix/Telegram channels to get information, and help others as well. Even if you do not continue your involvement with the KDE Community, we hope you will profit from these accomplishments, as we have.

FSCRYPT Inline Encryption Still Being Prepared For The Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux
Google

For a number of months now Google engineers have been working on FSCRYPT inline encryption capabilities for EXT4 and F2FS. The work is designed to offer better encryption performance on modern SoCs by having the encryption/decryption happen within the block layer as part of the bio and in turn leveraging the inline encryption hardware on modern Arm SoCs. The work still isn't merged but looks like it could be getting closer.

This past week marked the twelfth time that the FSCRYPT inline encryption patches were sent out. The latest revision of this work by Googlers Satya Tangirala and Eric Biggers is plugging the inline encryption support into BLK-MQ and other block code, implementing inline encryption within the FSCRYPT encryption framework, and wiring it through for EXT4, F2FS, and UFS file-systems.

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Google, Microsoft & Debian

Filed under
Google
Microsoft
Debian

Nonetheless, what does it look like when Microsoft's money comes along?

There can be no greater contamination. The letterhead of Software in the Public Interest, Inc used to request money from Microsoft???? While Sam Hartman was unleashing feral dogs to attack a long-standing volunteer, he was spreading his bum cheeks for Bill Gates to come in.

What are the principles that govern Debian Developers in 2020? They are clearly not the same as they were in 2006. Anybody who dares to ask about these paymasters is accused of violating the Code of Conduct. Long live the Code of Conduct.

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Chromium/Chrome Issues

Filed under
Google
Security
Web
  • Over 2 billion Google Chrome users warned of security risk on Windows, macOS and Linux

    Google has issued a critical warning for Chrome users across Windows, macOS and Linux, and has advised users to update their apps to the latest version of the build. A stable release version 81.0.4044.113 of Chrome is being seeded by Google and will reach users in the coming weeks.

    In a short blog post, Google warned users of its popular browser Chrome to update to the latest version whenever available. This is due to a bug that made the browser vulnerable to attack and exploitation. Having said that, the details about this particular security risk is being kept under wraps as Google wants to first get the latest update to users that fixes the issue.

  • Google Releases Much-Awaited Chrome Update; Alerts 2 Billion Users About Security Flaws Across Windows, Mac & Linux

    "The stable channel has been updated to 81.0.4044.113 for Windows, Mac, and Linux, which will roll out over the coming days/weeks," Google said in a blog post last week. "This update includes 1 security fix," it added.

    [...]

    "The community help forum is also a great place to reach out for help or learn about common issues," Google said. "Access to bug details and links may be kept restricted until a majority of users are updated with a fix. We will also retain restrictions if the bug exists in a third party library that other projects similarly depend on, but haven't yet fixed," it added.

  • Google Issues Warning For 2 Billion Chrome Users

    Are you a Google Chrome user? Google has issued a warning of a vulnerability in its Chrome browser across Windows, Mac and Linux - urging users to upgrade to the latest version of the browser (81.0.4044.113).

    Google just gave its two billion Chrome users a brilliant (if long overdue) upgrade, but it doesn’t mask all of the controversial changes, security problems and data concerns which have worried users about the browser recently. And now Google has issued a new critical warning you need to know about.

    Picked up by security specialist Sophos, Google has quietly issued a warning that Chrome has a critical security flaw across Windows, Mac and Linux and it urges users to upgrade to the latest version of the browser (81.0.4044.113). Interestingly, at the time of publication, Google is also keeping the exact details of the exploit a mystery.

  • Google Chrome and desktop icon refresh problem

    Looking around, I did find a Chromium bug report from 2015, which also mentioned a workaround. Needless to say, the specific workaround is no longer available, as the user icon is no longer present in the Chrome window border, and flags occasionally come and go, as they represent experimental browser features. But this was a good starting point, so I went about testing and tweaking, until I found the right solution. After me.

Google Chromebook vs. Gallium Chromebook

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Hardware

Chromebooks have been improving a lot over the years. They’re not just web browsers with keyboards anymore. Many Chromebooks can now run Linux programs via an included Crostini virtual machine container, and many can also run Android apps. (As long as it’s not enrolled in enterprise management: Be careful about buying refurbished Chromebooks.) Those additions can greatly improve the usefulness of Chromebooks and greatly reduces their limitations.

A few months ago, I wrote that a $99 Chromebook with Gallium OS installed is so much better. That was just an editorial with a “how to” though and I didn’t provide any in-depth experimentation or proof, so that’s what we’re going to do in this article.

I bought two refurbished $60 Lenovo N22 Chromebooks and installed Gallium OS on one of them while letting the other one update itself to the latest version of Chrome OS 80. This is after I got them un-enrolled from Google’s Enterprise Management of course.

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Galaxy Chromebook reviews

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Reviews

I can't imagine using something this fancy without wiping out the toy OS and installing Ubuntu Linux instead.

One thing that struck me is that The Verge's full-column warning (partially embedded below) about the clickwrap contracts the user must agree to just to start the machine. These are commonplace with gadgets, but rarely in such great numbers or with such hostile presentation. The reviewer writes they were unable to read them.

Tech companies have turned Linux into a transmission vector for adhesion contracts that are virtually impossible to read. To think, they used to complain that the GPL was a virus!

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What is good documentation for software projects?

Filed under
Development
Google
OSS

The Open Geospatial (OSGeo) Foundation recently participated in Google's first Season of Docs, in which Google sponsored senior technical writers to contribute to open source projects. OSGeo is an umbrella organization for around 50 geospatial open source projects. I've contributed to a number of these projects over the years and recently co-mentored the two Season of Docs technical writers Google allocated to OSGeo.

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Browsing Google's Open-Source Projects and More

Filed under
Development
Google
  • Code Search Now Available to Browse Google's Open-Source Projects

    Code Search is used by Google developers to search through Google's huge internal codebase. Now, Google has made it accessible to everyone to explore and better understand Google's open source projects, including TensorFlow, Go, Angular, and many others.

    CodeSearch aims to make it easier for developers to move through a codebase, find functions and variables using a powerful search language, readily locate where those are used, and so on.

    Code Search provides a sophisticated UI that supports suggest-as-you-type help that includes information about the type of an object, the path of the file, and the repository to which it belongs. This kind of behaviour is supported through code-savvy textual searches that use a custom search language. For example, to search for a function foo in a Go file, you can use lang:go:function:foo.

  • Now you can search code like a Googler…as long as it’s Google code

    Google has given devs, and anyone else who’s interested, the ability to delve deep into its open source projects, by launching code search across the key codebases.

    The vendor unwrapped Code Search this week, saying it was one of its own most popular internal tools and adding that the public tool will have the same binaries, but different flags.

    As for what they do with it, the blogpost announcing the tool said Googlers “search for half-remembered functions and usages; jump through the codebase to figure out what calls the function they are viewing; and try to identify when and why a particular line of code changed.”

  • Noble.AI completes contributions to TensorFlow, Google’s open-source framework for deep learning

    Noble.AI, whose artificial intelligence (AI) software is purpose-built for engineers, scientists, and researchers and enables them to innovate and make discoveries faster, announced that it had completed contributions to TensorFlow, the world’s most popular open-source framework for deep learning created by Google.

    “Part of Noble’s mission is building AI that’s accessible to engineers, scientists and researchers, anytime and anywhere, without needing to learn or re-skill into computer science or AI theory,” said Dr. Matthew C. Levy, Founder and CEO of Noble.AI.

  • Google: We're opening Code Search for Go, Angular, Dart, Flutter, TensorFlow and more

    Google has launched Code Search for several of its popular open-source projects, giving the wider software community what until now has been one of Google's most popular internal tools for developers.

    Code Search or 'CS' for open-source Google projects for now supports Angular, Bazel, Dart, ExoPlayer, Firebase SDK, Flutter, Go, gVisor, Kythe, Nomulus, Outline, and Tensorflow – which represent a small portion of Google's open-source projects, but ones that open-source communities may benefit from search being available on their respective repositories.

Season of Docs 2020 and Document Freedom Day 2020

Filed under
LibO
Google
OSS
OOo
  • Announcing Season of Docs 2020

    Season of Docs brings technical writers and open source projects together for a few months to work on open source documentation. 2019 was the first year of Season of Docs, bringing together open source organizations and technical writers to create 44 successful documentation projects!

  • Announcing Season of Docs 2020

    Google Open Source has announced the 2020 edition of Season of Docs, a program to connect open source projects with technical writers to improve documentation. Open source organizations may apply from April 14-May 4. Once mentoring organizations and technical writers are connected, there will be a month long community bonding period, beginning August 11. Writers will then work with mentors to complete documentation projects by the December 6 deadline.

  • Paint a Dove for Document Freedom Day

    Help us celebrate the Twelfth Anniversary of Document Freedom Day by making a paper dove!

    Download the dove template and the instructions from this link: https://tdf.io/dfd1, and once you are done with your dove take a picture of it and upload your photo using this link: https://tdf.io/dfd2.

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More in Tux Machines

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

  • dnsZoneEntry: field should be removed when DD is retired

    When Debian Developer had retired, actual DNS entry is removed, but dnsZoneEntry: field is kept on LDAP (db.debian.org) So you can not reuse *.debian.net if retired Debian Developer owns your prefered subdomain already.

  • Canonical have announced a new point release for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS - 16.04.7 (Xenial Xerus)

    Canonical have released the sixth point release of Ubuntu 16.04 Long-Term Support (LTS) as Ubuntu 16.04.7.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 650

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 650 for the week of September 20 – 26, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • Canonical at OSM Hackfest MR#9

    The 12th OSM Hackfest, or OSM mid-release NINE (MR#9) Hackfest, is one for the books and Canonical happily shared the presenter floor with the rest of the Open Source MANO (OSM) community. The event spanned the whole week from September 7th to 11th, with Wednesday September 9th afternoon being used for the OSM Ecosystem day. As per the last two hackfests, the remote format allowed participation of hundreds of enthusiasts. During the preparation of the hackfest, it was agreed to keep the same theme as the last one, so participants were able to use OSM to manage and orchestrate workloads in an end-to-end open source mobile network solution with the Facebook Connectivity project; Magma. [...] David Garcia, the N2VC MDL, had multiple sessions during day 2; an introduction to OSM primitives, Juju relations and a 3 hour workshop on OSM orchestration of VNFs. OSM uses Juju as a core component and leverages operators to drive lifecycle management, workload configuration, daily operations and integration functions. Juju is a universal operator lifecycle manager (OLM) that exposes events to the operators and enables users to deploy simple to complex models of applications declaring business intent instead of dealing with piles of configuration scripts. [...] The Ecosystem Day, an integral part of every hackfest, is for the community to learn about vendor-oriented solutions and projects. Among others, we had a demo of 5G Core network automation by OSM from Ulak Communications, we learned about vBNG orchestration using Juju by Benu networks and subscription and notification support in OSM by Tata ELXSI. We also presented a session on Charmed OSM, Canonical’s carrier-grade, hardened OSM distribution. Charmed OSM allows operators, GSIs and NEPs to move faster with NFV transformation through open-source technology and partner programmes.

Android Leftovers

Initial Fedora 32 vs. Fedora 33 Beta Benchmarks Point To Slightly Higher Performance

In addition to Fedora Workstation 33 switching to Btrfs, there are a number of key components updated in Fedora 33 as well as finally enabling link-time optimizations (LTO) for package builds that make this next Fedora Linux installment quite interesting from a performance perspective. Here are some initial benchmarks of Fedora Workstation 32 against the Fedora Workstation 33 Beta on an Intel Core i9 10900K system. Given the Fedora 33 beta release, here are our initial benchmarks of Fedora 33 that is due for its official release in late October. Over the past few days I've been testing the test compose of Fedora 33 Beta with all updates applied -- it's been quite a nice experience. There hasn't been any show-stopping bugs and all-around running nicely. Read more

Second Beta out for Krita 4.4.0

Today, we’re releasing Krita 4.4.0 beta 2: we found a number of regressions and release blocking bugs. This beta has Android builds too, since we fixed many issues with accessing files on Android: however, because we now add translations the APK files are too big for the Play Store, and you will have to download them from download.kde.org Read more