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Google Invests In Mobvoi, Its Android Wear Partner In China

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Android
Google

Google’s services are not available in China, but that isn’t stopping it from making a significant investment in a company based on Chinese soil. The U.S. search giant is backing Mobvoi, a three-year-old company specializing in mobile voice technology.

The duo already have business ties. Mobvoi is the company that Google picked to bring Android Wear, its operating system for wearables, to China, so this deal takes things up to the next level.

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Google (GOOG) Releases Faster Mobile Web Browsing In New Open-Source Initiative With Twitter And 38 News Organizations

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Google
OSS
Web

Android 6.0 up close: Google Now on Tap is almost amazing

Filed under
Android
Google

Can you believe it? After months of waiting and anticipation, Google's Android 6.0 Marshmallow release is finally on its way into the world.

I'll have a detailed overview of what's different with Marshmallow and why it all matters for regular users soon. First, I wanted to take an up-close look at one of Android 6.0's most interesting features: Google Now on Tap. As I mused when Google gave us our first glimpse at Now on Tap this summer, this feature really seems like the future of Android -- like something that has the potential to change the way we interact with our mobile devices.

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Android and Google Leftovers

Filed under
Android
Google
  • Facebook gives Android a kick in the byte code

    To improve the mobile performance of its social network, Facebook is enhancing Java bytecode on the Android platform with its Redex project, providing a pipeline for optimizing Android DEX (Dalvik Executable) files.

  • 13 of the best Android apps from September

    Coming off the back of the summer holidays always make September a busy month and this year it was no different.

    From useful spam fighting options arriving for Gmail to movie tracking and the launch of a huge repository of online tutorials across a range of subjects.

    We’ve sorted the wheat from the chaff and what follows is the best new and updated apps from September.

    All you need to do is clear a few minutes in your schedule and click your way through the list.

  • Google reveals new Chromecast and Chromecast Audio devices

    Google's Chromecast streaming media player has proven to be a popular item on Amazon, getting four star ratings and lots of positive comments from Amazon customers. Now Google has announced a brand new Chromecast, and also the new Chromecast Audio device.

  • Hands on: Google Pixel C convertible tablet

    It’s difficult to tell if the new Google Pixel C is a great idea, or an awful one. It feels like a greatest hits list of Windows 8 convertible failures. It’s a clamshell, and the tablet is connected to the keyboard via magnets. But to open it or close it, you have to pull it apart and reconnect it. You can also flip the tablet upright and stick the keyboard to the back of it, though it makes the tablet thicker and heavier than you may like. The entire converting process is messy. Google tries to cover it all up with a beautiful aluminum design and smooth hinges that adjust angle easily. But will it be fun to use every day? I’m not so sure.

  • Google announces the LG Nexus 5X and Huawei Nexus 6P; pre-orders start today

    Google has officially taken the wraps off its new flagship smartphone lineup. In keeping with the current smartphone release trends, Google is announcing two devices today: the Nexus 5X and Nexus 6P. The 5X is made by LG, and the 6P is made by Huawei. The Nexus 5X starts at $379, and the 6P starts at $499, and both phones will ship later this month. Pricing for other territories is starting to dribble in—the Nexus 5X and 6P will begin at £339 and £449 respectively in the UK—but we'll update the article with more complete information as it's made available.

  • Google announces the new Chromecast and Chromecast Audio

    The new Chromecast has a disk-like design, a departure from the original's dongle construction. Its improved internals should also make streaming easier and faster. Now featuring three antennas, it supports 5GHz 802.11ac Wi-Fi for faster connectivity and heavier formats like 1080p. While the new Chromecast handles video and game streaming, the Chromecast Audio device will handle streaming music or podcasts. The new Chromecast plugs into a device with HDMI; Audio uses both optical and headphone jacks to plug into speakers.

  • Fairphone launches v2 of it conflict-free, upgradeable smartphone

    There's a company offering a repairable and upgradable smartphone out there and Jack Wallen believe it is just what the world needs. Read on to see if you agree.

Google Chromebooks: The most popular classroom computing device

Filed under
Linux
Google

In Apple's place, Google with its Chromebooks have stepped in. Chromebooks are cheaper, easier to manage, and easy to share between students. The low upfront price is a big factor, but there's far more.

For example, Google offers programs just for schools, Google Apps for Education Suite; class-specific ChromeOS and Android apps, and Google Play for Education. Chromebooks that come with Google Play for Education range at prices from $199 to $227.

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Google’s Marshmallow Treats Now on Tap

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Google

Not so many years ago, the introduction of a major new Android release was more like looking six months or more into the future when your phone just might become eligible for upgrade. In the case of the Android 6.0 (“Marshmallow”) update announced yesterday, however, owners of recent Nexus devices can start downloading next week, and those who buy the newly announced Nexus devices -- the LG-made, 5.2-inch, Nexus 5X, and Huawei’s 5.7-inch Nexus 6P -- will feast on Marshmallow when the devices ship in October. The same goes for Google’s newly tipped Pixel-C tablet, due in December (see below). Based on Android 5.0 “Lollipop”, most other major Android devices that run Lollipop should be onboard before the end of the year or early 2016.

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Is Google's future in television in Chromecast, or is it in Android TVs?

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Android
Google

Chromecast is officially a thing. What started out as a simple streaming stick two years ago has now become a product that Google can boast about, with 20 million devices sold since launch. And today, we saw not one but two new versions of Chromecast, a video-streaming stick that supports modern Wi-Fi standards and another that now turns home speakers into Wi-Fi-connected, cast-enabled audio devices. Google has kept it at an accessible price — $35 per dongle — and the intent is clear: we're going to be in your living room, one way or another.

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New Chromecast devices target HDTVs and sound systems

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Google

Google rolled out a pair of second-generation Chromecast media players, including a replacement for the original HDMI Chromecast and an audio-only model.

Google today formally introduced its expected second generation Chromecast media streaming adapter, and as had been widely expected there are some welcome enhancements, along with the addition of an audio-only model. Both versions — dubbed “Chromecast 2015” and “Chromecast Audio” — are priced at $35, and are currently shipping within about two weeks of new orders. Also today, Google announced a pair of new Nexus smartphones based on Android 6.0 (aka “Marshmallow”): the Nexus 6P and Nexus 5X (see farther below).

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The Linux Foundation Says You Should Install Linux on Your Chromebook

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

The Linux Foundation is now recommending that users with new and shiny Chromebooks should really install Linux along their Chrome OS distros.

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Google's Android mobile software piles on more users

Filed under
Android
Google

About 1.4 billion devices around the world now use the Android mobile operating system, said Google CEO Sundar Pichai. The figure is up from the 1 billion that Google announced in May. Pichai said many of those users are in emerging economies such as Vietnam and Indonesia. The US Census Bureau estimates about 7.3 billion people live around the world, which means Google has extended the reach of its Android software to more than 19 percent of the Earth's inhabitants.

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Meaning of Convergence, Exploit Excludes Linux

The big news yesterday and even into today was the new Ubuntu tablet, which everyone including Canonical touted as "convergence delivered." Well, today Randall Ross scolds news sites for missing the "timely idea" that is convergence. In other news, security researchers have identified a new exploit that specifically avoids Linux. FOSS Force found that Linux users have no interest in anti-virus software and Phoronix reports on Ubuntu performance over the years. Read more

Tor Browser 5.5.1 Brings a Functional Private Anonymous Browser to Chinese Users

The Tor Project announced today, February 5, 2016, the immediate availability for download of the first point release for the Tor Browser 5.5 anonymous web browser for Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows platforms. Read more

Ubuntu Linux in the Wild: How a French University Uses Unity

Is Canonical's Unity interface for Ubuntu Linux ready for use by the masses? Arguably, no. But the administration of the Ecole normale supérieure (ENS) in Paris apparently likes Unity well enough to deploy it throughout the university's library. The ENS is one of France's "grandes écoles," or elite universities. It also happens to have one of the only open-stack academic libraries in Paris, which is what brought me there this week. I was surprised upon entering to find that the workstations throughout the library now run Ubuntu (which was not the case when I was last there, circa early 2012). Here's proof: Read more

The trials of certifying open source software

Open source won and, over the past five years or so, we have been seeing the acceleration of a new wave of open source projects that got their starts in corporations. This comes with a set of new challenges, as new corporate participants struggle with some of the realities. Folks generally understand that foundations provide neutrality in some form, but don't necessarily know how to drive the competitive discussions from the room. One of the more disturbing symptoms of this confusion is the discussions beginning around "certification" and what it means to be certified to a particular project. What is Certified Good SoftwareTM? [1] Read more