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Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Google
  • Google Developers Improve Mesa's Android EGL Support
  • Nouveau DRM Code Updated For Linux 4.8

    The Nouveau open-source NVIDIA DRM driver changes have been queued in DRM-Next for the Linux 4.8 kernel.

    Nouveau updates this time around include GK20A/GM20B Tegra K1/X1 voltage and clock improvements as well as initial support for GP100 and GP104 GPUs. The latter provides initial KMS support for the GeForce GTX 1000 series. While NVIDIA did release some Pascal firmware, it ended up being only for the GP100 and not the GP104 or GP106. Thus with Linux 4.8 there isn't any hardware-accelerated support for the consumer GeForce GTX 1060/1070/1080 cards on the open-source driver stack. For those cards it comes down to un-accelerated kernel mode-setting support until NVIDIA releases the rest of the Pascal firmware in the future.

Managing your containers at Google scale

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
Google

The tooling around Linux containers has matured to the point that they are now a viable method of software packaging and deployment. The developer side of the containers equation has gotten a lot of emphasis. However, in order for containers to be a complete solution, they must not only be easy to build, but easy to deploy reliably at scale.

A company that arguably has more experience than any other company in deploying Linux containers at scale is Google. They have been running conatiners in their own datacenters for over a decade, contributing to the upstream Linux kernel in the areas of cgroups and namespaces. Using an internal system named Borg, Google deploys about 2 billion containers per week.

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Google “Project Bloks” education kit starts with RPi Zero

Filed under
Linux
Google

Google’s “Project Bloks” education platform is built around a Raspberry Pi Zero that controls baseboards that talk to “Puck” inputs via a capacitive sensor.

Google announced a Project Bloks hacker platform for kids, developed with IDEO and Paulo Blikstein of Stanford University. A prototype has been built based on the Linux-driven Raspberry Pi Zero SBC, and now Google is seeking researchers, developers, and designers who are interested in using the technology “to build physical coding experiences.” Later this year, Google will conduct a remote research study with the help of these partners.

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Android apps on Chromebook

Filed under
Android
Gentoo
Google
  • How to install Android apps on Chromebook

    A nice surprise landed on my Chromebook Flip when I checked for updates late last week. The dev channel running on Chromebook was ready with the much awaited 53.0.x update that brings the Google Play Store to Chrome OS devices. I updated it and I have been running Android apps on my Chromebook Flip since Friday.

  • How to run Android Apps on your Chromebook

    For now, there's only one Chromebook that will do it, the ASUS Chromebook Flip, but soon most newer models Chromebooks will be able to run most of the 1.5 million Android apps.

Google/ChromeOS/Android

Filed under
Android
Google

Google Magenta

Filed under
Google
OSS

Google and Oracle

Filed under
Google
Security
Legal

Oracle Desperate

Filed under
Android
Google
Legal
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More in Tux Machines

KDE Leftovers

  • 7 Things to do After Installing KDE Plasma
    Even for other Linux users, KDE Plasma can seem like a different operating system. Except for a few standards like LibreOffice, the apps are different, and so is the design philosophy, which tends to cram in every possible feature. As a result, once they install, users are likely to wonder what to do next.
  • KDE Framworks 5 Content Snap Techno
    In the previous post on Snapping KDE Applications we looked at the high-level implication and use of the KDE Frameworks 5 content snap to snapcraft snap bundles for binary distribution. Today I want to get a bit more technical and look at the actual building and inner workings of the content snap itself. The KDE Frameworks 5 snap is a content snap. Content snaps are really just ordinary snaps that define a content interface. Namely, they expose part or all of their file tree for use by another snap but otherwise can be regular snaps and have their own applications etc. KDE Frameworks 5’s snap is special in terms of size and scope. The whole set of KDE Frameworks 5, combined with Qt 5, combined with a large chunk of the graphic stack that is not part of the ubuntu-core snap. All in all just for the Qt5 and KF5 parts we are talking about close to 100 distinct source tarballs that need building to compose the full frameworks stack. KDE is in the fortunate position of already having builds of all these available through KDE neon. This allows us to simply repack existing work into the content snap. This is for the most part just as good as doing everything from scratch, but has the advantage of saving both maintenance effort and build resources.
  • Calligra 3.0 Is Ready As A Qt5 / KDE Frameworks 5 Office Suite
    It's been quite a while since last having anything to report on the KDE Calligra open-source graphics/office suite while surprisingly this morning it was pleasant to see Calligra 3.0 tagged for release.
  • KDE Applications 16.12 Up to Release Candidate State, Final Arrives December 15
    The KDE development team was proud to announce the availability of the Release Candidate (RC) build of the upcoming KDE Applications 16.12 software suite for the KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment. Work on KDE Applications 16.12 started about a month ago, on November 10, when the third and last maintenance update of the current stable KDE Applications 16.08 release was announced, marking the end of life of the series. Until today, KDE Applications 16.12 received a Beta development version, tagged as build 16.11.80, and now we're seeing the Release Candidate, tagged as build 16.11.90.

64-bit Raspberry Image and OpenStack at SUSE

  • openSUSE Leap 42.2 gets 64-bit Raspberry Image
    The latest release from openSUSE has new images available for the Raspberry Pi and joins SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Raspberry Pi in becoming the initial distributions with 64-bit for the Raspberry Pi 3. The 64-bit image of openSUSE Leap 42.2 for the Raspberry Pi 3 has been out for a couple weeks. “The ARM and AArch64 Images for openSUSE Leap 42.2 are not a once-only release,” said Dirk Mueller. “They get continuously updated and include fixes as the Leap 42.2 port matures over time. These are the first usable images, and more variants with more fixes will come over time.”
  • OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 Does A 64-bit Spin For The Raspberry Pi 3
    Following SUSE Linux Enterprise Server as being available in a 64-bit edition catered to the Raspberry Pi 3, openSUSE developers have now released a 64-bit image of Leap 42.2 for the RPi3.
  • http://ostatic.com/blog/suse-buys-hpes-openstack-and-cloud-foundry-assets-talent
    Back in November, the Cloud Foundry Foundation, home of an industry-standard platform for cloud applications, announced that SUSE had increased its engagement and support of Cloud Foundry by becoming a Platinum member. Now, SUSE has entered into an agreement with Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) to acquire technology and talent that will expand SUSE's OpenStack Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) solution. In addition, the company announced that it will accelerate its entry into the growing Cloud Foundry Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) market, and said that the acquired OpenStack assets will be integrated into SUSE OpenStack Cloud.

Pico-ITX SBC runs Ubuntu on Braswell

DFI announced an Intel Braswell based “BW051” Pico-ITX SBC with up to 8GB DDR3L, mini-PCIe, SATA 3.0, mSATA, and Linux support. DFI, which earlier this year tapped Intel’s “Braswell” generation of SoCs for its BW968 COM Express Compact Type 6 module, has now chosen Braswell for a Pico-ITX SBC. The 100 x 72mm BW051 ships with 4-6W Braswell processors including dual or quad-core Celeron models, the quad-core 1.6GHz Pentium N3710, and quad-core, 1.04GHz Atom x5-E8000. Read more

Shuttleworth Foundation/Mozilla Foundation Overlap

  • Helen Turvey Joins the Mozilla Foundation Board of Directors
    Today, we’re welcoming Helen Turvey as a new member of the Mozilla Foundation Board of Directors. Helen is the CEO of the Shuttleworth Foundation. Her focus on philanthropy and openness throughout her career makes her a great addition to our Board. Throughout 2016, we have been focused on board development for both the Mozilla Foundation and the Mozilla Corporation boards of directors. Our recruiting efforts for board members has been geared towards building a diverse group of people who embody the values and mission that bring Mozilla to life. After extensive conversations, it is clear that Helen brings the experience, expertise and approach that we seek for the Mozilla Foundation Board.
  • Why I’m joining Mozilla’s Board, by Helen Turvey
    For the last decade I have run the Shuttleworth Foundation, a philanthropic organisation that looks to drive change through open models. The FOSS movement has created widely used software and million dollar businesses, using collaborative development approaches and open licences. This model is well established for software, it is not the case for education, philanthropy, hardware or social development.