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Google

Google's Openwashing and Use of FOSS

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Google
  • 5 Key AI Announcements From Google Cloud 2019 & Why It’s Still The Big Friendly Open Source Giant [Ed: Google is not "Big Friendly Open Source Giant"; it's a proprietary software company (all the core things are proprietary) with 'surveillance capitalism' as the business model.]
  • Why You Should Consider Google AI Platform For Your Machine Learning Projects
  • Google Anthos reaffirms “managed open-source” as the future of hybrid cloud

    Google Anthos is a huge validation for Platform9’s approach to fully managed hybrid clouds powered by open-source technologies. In particular, the 5 tenets below that are at the core of the technology we’ve pioneered years ago are being used in production since 2015 by our enterprise customers across thousands of cloud deployments every today to power their business.

  • Google Cloud adds Confluent, MongoDB and other open-source projects as managed services

    Confluent, the company founded by the creators of the Apache Kafka streaming data platform, announced last week that its Confluent Cloud for Apache Kafka is to be available natively on the Google Platform.

  • Q&A: Advice from Red Hat aided Google Anthos’ open-source journey

    Even as Google has built one of the world’s most successful businesses on cloud computing, translating its innovations into enterprise-ready services has been a challenge in a competitive field. Now under new leadership and rebranded as Anthos, the contemporary Google Cloud Platform is the result of a series of decisions spanning open-source partnerships and storage technologies, layered with strong software support for a multicloud world.

    “I’ve been working with Google on their cloud efforts for almost 10 years now, and it started back when Google was about to get into the cloud business. They had to decide whether they were going to use KVM or Xen as their hypervisor, and we helped them do that,” said Mike Evans, vice president of technical business development at Red Hat Inc., noting his company’s role in aiding Google’s contemplation of open-source hypervisors for running their virtual machine services.

Android Browser Choice Screen in Europe

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Android
Google
Moz/FF
Web

Today, Google announced a new browser choice screen in Europe. We love an opportunity to show more people our products, like Firefox for Android. Independent browsers that put privacy and security first (like Firefox) are great for consumers and an important part of the Android ecosystem.

There are open questions, though, about how well this implementation of a choice screen will enable people to easily adopt options other than Chrome as their default browser. The details matter, and the true measure will be the impact on competition and ultimately consumers. As we assess the results of this launch on Mozilla’s Firefox for Android, we’ll share our impressions and the impact we see.

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Linux kernel-bypassing Quobyte plug-in goes with the TensorFlow for faster file access

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Linux
Google

Linux-loving hyperscale types at Euro startup Quobyte have pushed out a plug-in for its Data Centre File System, used in HPC-style workloads, that enables TensorFlow apps to access its files directly instead of having to traipse through the Linux kernel.

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SELinux in Android and Google Pixel 4/3a

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Android
Linux
Google

Google Openwashing of Its Surveillance 'Cloud'

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Server
Google
OSS

GAFAM Competing Over Who's Friendliest to Free/Open Source Software

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Server
Google
OSS
  • Google Takes a Friendlier Path to Open Source Than Amazon

    Google recently announced partnerships with MongoDB, Redis Labs, and several other open-source data management companies. The crux of the partnership is that these companies' offerings will be more tightly integrated into Google's Cloud Platform. Customers will be able to use these select applications from one unified Google Cloud interface, rely on Google's technical support for these apps, and receive a unified bill for all.

    Financials were not disclosed, though TechCrunch suggested some sort of profit-sharing arrangement. While these open-source companies probably don't like giving away part of their revenue, Google is also taking care of associated customer support costs; in addition, some revenue on wider distribution is certainly better than nothing, which is what these companies receive when a user opts for Amazon's in-house imitations.

  • Google Cloud challenges AWS with new open-source integrations

    Google today announced that it has partnered with a number of top open-source data management and analytics companies to integrate their products into its Google Cloud Platform and offer them as managed services operated by its partners.

Google challenges AWS with open-source support

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Google
OSS

At the Google Cloud Next conference Google announced new and expanded partnerships with several open-source businesses. Interesting, several of these have changed their licenses in no small part because they felt Amazon Web Services (AWS) was strip-mining their code.

These partners are MongoDB, Confluent, DataStax, Elastic, InfluxData, Neo4j, and Redis Labs. These new partnerships offer Google Cloud customers managed database services with efforts made to optimize performance and latency between the service and application. Customers will get a unified user interface for app management.

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Games: New Titles on GNU/Linux, Linux Gaming News Punch and More

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Google

The Demise of Google+ and the Case for FOSS

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Google
OSS

So much for Google+. As of April 2, 2019, the social media site’s personal accounts are no longer available for posting or comments, although for the time-being users can still access their accounts for downloading data. News of the shutdown proved surprisingly disturbing to me, reminding me of why I have used free and open source software exclusively for years.

Personally, I never warmed to Google+. Although I used it almost from the start, for me it was always a poor third to Facebook and Twitter among social sites. Although it often had better discussions, it wasn’t where most of my friends and acquaintances were — which, after all, is what social media is about. I would post a few times a week, and respond to comments, but I rarely checked other accounts, and never took part in any groups. Still, I would usually login for a few minutes before beginning my day’s work.

Yet somehow I couldn’t let the news go. In the last month of Google+’s existence I found myself counting down the days. On the morning it was shuttered, I automatically started to go the site, and when I remembered it was no longer active, I had a flash of anger I couldn’t explain. Before I knew it, I was having a flashback to the mid-1990s and the end of OS/2. Once again, a company was making decisions that affected my computer use without bothering to consult me.

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Android Open Source Project Updates

Filed under
Android
Google
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