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GNOME Chromecast Extension "Cast to TV" v9 Adds Subtitle Configuration, Nautilus Integration

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Google
GNOME

For the latest Cast to TV v9, the extension settings were redesigned, and there are some new options. The most important change is in my opinion, the addition of Chromecast subtitle settings - you can now change the subtitle font family, style, size, color, outline or background color.

The new version ships with an easier way of installing the required npm modules - a button to install the modules was added to the Modules tab.

Yet another new option allows hiding the remote label (the text shown on the top bar for the Chromecast remote when casting), a useful addition since the text was quite long and it wasn't showing any useful information.

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Google and Collabora Add Major Change to Linux Kernel 5.1 for Chrome OS Devices

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OS
Linux
Google

According to Collabora's latest report on their contributions to the Linux 5.1 kernel, which arrived last week, it is now possible to mount and boot a mapped device by adding a kernel parameter via command-line at boot time, thus bypassing initramfs image. For Linux kernel 5.1, twelve Collabora's developers also contributed 64 commits and 111 sign-offs, along with lots of bug reports and testing.

"Helen Koike contributed a major change, providing a mechanism to mount a mapped device at boot time through a kernel command line parameter, removing the current initramfs requirement," said Collabora's André Almeida. "This change is the result of the combined effort of both Google and Collabora engineers to push upstream a feature that is shipped on Chrome OS devices and Android devices using AVB 2.0."

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ChromeOS and 'Proper' GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • Every Chromebook sold this year will support Linux apps

    If the ability to run desktop Linux apps on Chromebooks is something that interests you, but you’re yet to bite on buying a device to do it, it sounds like your patience has paid off!

    Google has apparently said that every Chromebook launched in 2019 will support Linux apps out of the box, according to an Android Police update on Google I/O 2019 happenings.

    Linux Apps on Chrome OS (codenamed “Crostini”) made their formal debut last year when they entered beta with the release of ChromeOS 69.

    The feature is still in beta as of the most recent Chrome OS release, v75, but is already proving popular with users, with particular appeal amongst developers.

  • Linux-Ready Chromebooks To Launch This Year With Android Studio

    Google has confirmed that all laptops running Chrome OS this year will be Linux-Ready Chromebooks. The news comes after the main keynote at Google I/O which introduced a number of features to Google Search, Google Assistant and a lot more.

    Google also confirmed that Linux-Ready Chromebooks will have an easy time installing Android Studio. Earlier this wasn’t the case as developers struggled with developing Android apps on Chromebooks.

  • All Chromebooks launched this year will be Linux-ready

    Last year, Google brought Linux support to Chromebooks. It's a really nifty feature, and it's only been improving since I/O 2018. But this year, Google announced that all Chromebooks launched in 2019 will be Linux-ready right out of the box, which is great for developers, enthusiasts, and newbies alike.

    These announcements have been quick and brief, but at least this news is straight to the point, though every Chromebook I've tested recently had Linux support. As someone who regularly distro hops on my personal machines, the Linux installation process on Chrome OS is top-notch for ease of use, I must say.

Google's GNU/Linux Take and EMUI 9 Review

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux
Google
  • Polish the Chrome

    Using Chromebooks is a bittersweet experience; it feels as if we’re so close to using a successful Linux-based ecosystem, and yet it never comes close to feeling like a fully fledged FOSS solution. In spite (or despite?) of our misgivings about Google Chromebooks, the platform has become a hit – not just in educational circles, but businesses are also picking them up for a number of reasons. Not least their ease of maintenance, low cost, lightweight software footprint and the built-in integration with the flourishing Google ecosystem.
    There are bonuses to running the shared Linux heritage. It has enabled Google to expand the the Chromebook’s basic abilities to running not just Android apps (in a clever containerised system), but now fully fledged desktop Linux software too.

  • EMUI 9 Review [Part 2]: Huawei/Honor’s Android Pie Software Packs a Ton of Useful Features Mistaken for Gimmicks

    Among the various Android forks, Huawei’s EMUI is second only to Samsung’s One UI in terms of customization. There’s a staggering amount of features and pre-installed apps to meet your needs. In part 2 of my EMUI 9 review, I’ll go over all the features and apps that Huawei and Honor offer on their latest smartphones. If you haven’t already checked out part 1 of the review which covers EMUI 9’s Design and Behavioral changes over stock Android 9 Pie, then I recommend you click the link below to read that part.

GSoC Funds for Krita Development and Outreachy for Summer 2019

Filed under
KDE
Google
  • Our 2019 Google Summer of Code Students

    Krita, part of KDE, takes part in the fourteenth edition of Google Summer of Code. Four students will be working on a wide variety of  projects. Here’s the shortlist:

    Sharaf Zaman will be working on porting Krita to Android. In fact, he already has a port of Krita for Android that already starts on some devices! The port is still missing libraries, scripts to automate building the dependencies and Krita: the first goal of the project is have a dependable, reproducible way of building Krita for Android. Initially, we won’t do much if any work on a nice tablet GUI.

  • Outreachy Summer 2019 Participants & Projects Announced

    In addition to Google announcing the accepted GSoC 2019 summer projects, the Outreachy organization on Monday also announced their accepted participants and projects for this internship effort that encourages women and other under-represented groups in technology to get involved in the open-source movement.

GNU and Linux at Google: Laptops, Servers and Cars

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
Google
  • Chrome OS 74 Stable version arrives: Here’s what you need to know

    It’s only been a month since Chrome OS 73 landed on the Stable Channel and here we are with Chrome OS 74 now available. Google announced Chrome OS 74 for the Stable Channel this past week and it’s filled with fixes and new features for Chromebooks.

  • Google Cloud is the single-largest driver of headcount growth at Google

    The number of people working at Google surged 21 percent in the first quarter compared to the same period last year, and its Google Cloud division was the main factor.

    Google announced Monday as part of its quarterly earnings report that 103,459 people now work for the search giant, which has also been scrambling to build a cloud computing business that can match the likes of Amazon Web Services and Microsoft. “Cloud has continued to be the primary driver of headcount,” said Google CFO Ruth Porat on a conference call with analysts following the release of the results.

  • Google opens Android Automotive OS to Spotify, other media app developers

    Google is opening its Android Automotive operating system up to third-party developers to bring music and other entertainment apps into vehicle infotainment systems, starting with the Polestar 2, an all-electric vehicle developed by Volvo’s standalone electric performance brand.

    Google announced Wednesday that media app developers will be able to create new entertainment experiences for Android Automotive OS and the Polestar 2, starting at Google I/O 2019, the annual developer’s conference that kicks off May 7.

Chrome 75 Beta and More Chrome News

Filed under
Google
Web
  • Chrome 75 Beta: low latency canvas contexts, sharing files, and numeric separators

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows. Find more information about the features listed here through the provided links or from the list on ChromeStatus.com. Chrome 75 is beta as of May 2, 2019.

  • Beta Channel Update for Desktop

    The Chrome team is excited to announce the promotion of Chrome 75 to the beta channel for Windows, Mac and Linux. Chrome 75.0.3770.18 contains our usual under-the-hood performance and stability tweaks, but there are also some cool new features to explore - please head to the Chromium blog to learn more!

  • Chrome 75 Beta Released With Low-Latency Canvas Contexts, RTC Improvements

    Following the recent Chrome 74 web browser update, Google has now promoted Chrome 75 to its beta channel.

    Chrome 75 introduces an Animation constructor for more control over creating animations with the Web Animations API, low-latency canvas contexts, various RTC improvements, FIDO CTAP2 PIN support was added to the Web Authentication API, Web Share API Level 2 support, and various other developer editions.

  • 5 Best Free VPN Chrome Extension For Privacy In 2019

    Whenever you are online on Google Chrome, it collects information on your browsing patterns and habits — right from your location, to operating system, to hardware. Therefore, securing your browsing sessions through Virtual Private Networks (VPN) is a good idea. VPNs are useful services which help you overcome geo-location restrictions and avoid getting tracked on the internet.

    While there are many Chrome VPN extensions available in the Chrome store, picking out the best ones can still be a confusing task. This is why I have put together a list of the best VPN Chrome extensions that you can use to encrypt your browser traffic and browse anonymously.

GNU/Linux a Decade Later and Inside Google 'Prison' (Chrome OS)

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GNU
Linux
Google
  • The 9th Anniversary

    Wow... Today is the ninth anniversary of this blog, which has its humble origins as my personal attempt to record my experiences as a Linux user when I migrated.

    In this journey, I wrote about the different problems that I encountered and how to solve them. Linux has grown so stable, however, that, as a non-technical user, I barely find problems with my computers, so the quantity of my posts has reduced.

  • Chrome OS 74 hits the stable branch, brings audio output support for Linux apps and more

    A new Chrome OS stable version is always fun. This is v74, which brings with it, among other things, audio output support for Linux applications (yay) and USB camera support for the Android Camera app. You can find the full changelog below.

  • Linux Apps Getting Major Improvements in Chrome OS 74

    Google has released Chrome 74 with a long list of improvements, and one of the key changes concerns the way the platform gets along with Linux apps.
    Beginning with this version, Linux apps can finally output audio on ChromeOS, so Google managed to resolve one of the biggest issues with its Linux implementation in the operating system.

    Google says the same release includes USB camera support for the Android Camera app, which technically means that you are able to use any USB webcam with the official Camera app on Android.

    ChromeOS 74 also introduces support for new files and folders in the “My files” local root, as well as deeper integration with Google by allowing users to see their most recent apps and searchers by simply clicking the search box.

Plans for Chromebooks

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Hardware
  • AMD Zen+ Chromebooks a Step Closer, Thanks to Google Coreboot Support

    Google has recently been working on bringing Fuchsia (a new operating system the company has been developing) and Chrome OS support to multiple AMD processors. The latest to receive support in the open source Coreboot firmware were AMD’s 7th gen Stoney Ridge APUs which were used in HP’s first-ever AMD-based Chromebooks.
    In January, AMD announced the Picasso APU series, which uses a Zen+ CPU and Vega graphics. According to recent rumors, Google was already working on adding support in Chrome OS for a reference design board called Zork that used the Picasso APU. The latest news about Picasso being supported in Coreboot reinforces the idea that we’ll soon see some Chromebooks using AMD’s latest generation of mobile APUs..

  • Will somebody make me a Chromebook with a 'real' graphics card? [Ed: Will you purchase a 'real' computer rather than rent one from Google (for Google to remotely control)?]

    The inclusion of packaged Linux applications for Chrome has changed that. Now, if you're a developer who uses a Linux desktop to write, compile, and test code, a Chromebook is an excellent choice. You'll appreciate a model with a new-ish Intel CPU and 8 or even 16 GB of RAM when it comes to doing all that, and when you're not being productive, you have the same entertainment options through the web and Google Play that every Chromebook has. It's a pretty sweet setup. But there's still one piece of the puzzle missing that would make a Chromebook even better: a high-end GPU.

Browsers: Chromium 74 on Slackware, TenFourFox on OS/2, Debugging Firefox Trunk and Brave Forked

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Chromium 74 available in my repository. Also for 32bit Slackware.

    The Chromium 74 sources were released a few days ago by Google, and it comes with a long list of fixes for security issues.
    I spent almost two months to investigate why the 32bit package could no longer be built (which is one of the reasons why there were so few updates in march and april – I only have a few hours every day that I can spend on Slackware these days) and had finally managed to compile a 32bit package for Chromium 73 in a 32bit chroot environment on a 64bit Slackware OS, and that package was online for one day…. and now I tried compiling the new release on a regular 32bit Slackware OS and that worked! No idea whether this is because of my modifications of the SlackBuild.

  • Cameron Kaiser: Another interesting TenFourFox downstream

    Because we're one of the few older forks of Firefox to still backport security updates, TenFourFox code turns up in surprising places sometimes. I've known about roytam's various Pale Moon and Mozilla builds; the patches are used in both the rebuilds of Pale Moon 27 and 28 and his own fork of 45ESR. Arctic Fox, which is a Pale Moon 27 (descended from Firefox 38, with patches) rebuild for Snow Leopard and PowerPC Linux, also uses TenFourFox security patches as well as some of our OS X platform code.
    Recently I was also informed of a new place TenFourFox code has turned up: OS/2. There's no Rust for OS/2, so they're in the same boat that PowerPC OS X is, and it doesn't look like 52ESR was ever successfully ported to OS/2 either; indeed, the last "official" Firefox I can find from Bitwise is 45.9. Dave Yeo took that version (as well as Thunderbird 45.9 and SeaMonkey 2.42.9) and backported our accumulated security patches along with other fixes to yield updated "SUa1" Firefox, Thunderbird and SeaMonkey builds for OS/2. If you're curious, here are the prerequisites.

  • Update To rr Master To Debug Firefox Trunk

    The issue is that LMDB opens a file, maps it into memory MAP_SHARED, and then opens the file again and writes to it through the new file descriptor, and requires that the written data be immediately reflected in the shared memory mapping. (This behavior is not guaranteed by POSIX but is guaranteed by Linux.) rr needs to observe these writes and record the necessary memory changes, otherwise they won't happen during replay (because writes to files don't happen during replay) and replay will fail. rr already handled the case when the application write to the file descriptor (technically, the file description) that was used to map the file — Chromium has needed this for a while. The LMDB case is harder to handle. To fix LMDB, whenever the application opens a file for writing, we have to check to see if any shared mapping of that file exists and if so, mark that file description so writes to it have their shared-memory effects recorded. Unfortunately this adds overhead to writable file opens, but hopefully it doesn't matter much since in many workloads most file opens are read-only. (If it turns out to be a problem there are ways we can optimize further.) While fixing this, we also added support for the case where the application opens a file (possibly multiple times with different file descriptions) and then creates a shared mapping of one of them. To handle that, when creating a shared mapping we have to scan all open files to see if any of them refer to the mapped file, and if so, mark them so the effects of their writes are recorded.

  • Gab is forking Brave, and Brave is forking furious

    Gab, the free-speech absolutist social media network, continues to look for creative ways to resist being silenced.

    Having earned a reputation as a platform that is tolerant of even the most hateful (yet still technically legal) expressions of speech, Gab has been booted off virtually every Silicon Valley service imaginable—from payment processors to web host providers.

    Now, fresh off having its browser plug-in Dissenter, the “comment section of the Internet,” ejected from the Google and Mozilla extension libraries, Gab is taking the oft-used “if you don’t like it, go create your own” criticism to heart. The company has built its own web browser—a forked version of the open-source Brave browser—and will be releasing it within the next few weeks, Gab CEO Andrew Torba tells Decrypt .

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