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Google

GSoC 2017

Filed under
Google
OSS
  • Netfilter in GSoC 2017

    Great news! The Netfilter project has been elected by Google to be a mentoring organization in this year Google Summer of Code program. Following the pattern of the last years, Google seems to realise and support the importance of this software project in the Linux ecosystem.

  • Over 200 Open Source Orgs Mentoring GSoC 2017

    The list of mentoring organizations for this year's Google Summer of Code has been posted and there's a record number of them. The list includes large and well known projects together with smaller and less familiar ones.

How Ubuntu is helping to optimize Google Cloud

Filed under
Google
Software
Interviews
Ubuntu

While the products that Ubuntu provides — such as Canonical Livepatch Service and Juju — are well-known in the cloud community, its corporate stance is not as recognized. It’s hoping to change that perception.

“Ubuntu is a very popular [operating system], and we are most dominant in public cloud,” explained Udi Nachmany, vice president of public cloud at Ubuntu.

Read more

Microsoft’s browsers are shedding users, new Firefox for Ubuntu, Firefox axes Windows XP support

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web

Chromebooks Are Spreading

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gentoo
Google
  • Best Chromebooks for business 2017: Should I buy a Chromebook? Chromebook buying advice

    Instead of running Microsoft Windows or Mac OS X, Chromebooks support Google's Chrome operating system (OS), meaning that these machines are entirely internet and cloud-based.

    Good for those familiar with the Chrome web browser and the Google productivity suite (Docs, Sheets, Slides), not so good for those wanting to perform heavy duty tasks with external applications.

    But keep an open mind, if you're looking for a cheap laptop to perform internet-based tasks, such as emails or web browsing, the Chromebook could be a viable option or a great option for a second machine.

    Read on to find out the best Chromebooks for business...

  • Apple’s Devices Lose Luster in American Classrooms

    Apple is losing its grip on American classrooms, which technology companies have long used to hook students on their brands for life.

    Over the last three years, Apple’s iPads and Mac notebooks — which accounted for about half of the mobile devices shipped to schools in the United States in 2013 — have steadily lost ground to Chromebooks, inexpensive laptops that run on Google’s Chrome operating system and are produced by Samsung, Acer and other computer makers.

  • Apple Losing Out to Microsoft and Google in U.S. Classrooms [iophk: "weird-ass spin there in the title. Apple is really losing to Google, Microsoft is treading water instead."]

    According to research company Futuresource Consulting, in 2016 the number of devices in American classrooms that run iOS and macOS fell to third place behind both Google-powered laptops and Windows devices.

Google Summer of Code

Filed under
Google
OSS

Review: Google Pixel is Android at its best (if a little boring)

Filed under
Android
Google
Reviews

The Pixel’s designs have been divisive ever since the first batch of leaks hit the interwebs, but I’ve grown quite fond of it. Maybe it’s the fact that my ‘Really Blue’ (provided to us by Verizon, thanks folks) model is in fact so incredibly blue, but really I just think the two tone look stands out. It’s instantly recognizable if you’ve seen the phone before.

Read more

Google's Upspin Debuts

Filed under
Google
OSS
  • Another option for file sharing

    Existing mechanisms for file sharing are so fragmented that people waste time on multi-step copying and repackaging. With the new project Upspin, we aim to improve the situation by providing a global name space to name all your files. Given an Upspin name, a file can be shared securely, copied efficiently without "download" and "upload", and accessed by anyone with permission from anywhere with a network connection.

  • Google Developing "Upspin" Framework For Naming/Sharing Files

    Google today announced an experimental project called Upspin that's aiming for next-generation file-sharing in a secure manner.

  • Google releases open source file sharing project 'Upspin' on GitHub

    Believe it or not, in 2017, file-sharing between individuals is not a particularly easy affair. Quite frankly, I had a better experience more than a decade ago sending things to friends and family using AOL Instant Messenger. Nowadays, everything is so fragmented, that it can be hard to share.

    Today, Google unveils yet another way to share files. Called "Upspin," the open source project aims to make sharing easier for home users. With that said, the project does not seem particularly easy to set up or maintain. For example, it uses Unix-like directories and email addresses for permissions. While it may make sense to Google engineers, I am dubious that it will ever be widely used.

  • Google devs try to create new global namespace

    Wouldn't it be nice if there was a universal and consistent way to give names to files stored on the Internet, so they were easy to find? A universal resource locator, if you like?

    The problem is that URLs have been clunkified, so Upspin, an experimental project from some Google engineers, offers an easier model: identifying files to users and paths, and letting the creator set access privileges.

Go 1.8 Release Notes

Filed under
Development
Google
  • Go 1.8 Release Notes

    The latest Go release, version 1.8, arrives six months after Go 1.7. Most of its changes are in the implementation of the toolchain, runtime, and libraries. There are two minor changes to the language specification. As always, the release maintains the Go 1 promise of compatibility. We expect almost all Go programs to continue to compile and run as before.

  • Go 1.8 Released With Various Performance Improvements

    Google today announced the release of the Go 1.8 programming language implementation that is coming with six months worth of features and changes.

    Go 1.8 has a few new 64-bit x86 instructions supported, Go 1.8 now uses its new compiler back-end on all architectures (with Go 1.7 their new compiler back-end was just used on 64-bit x86) and that should yield a 20~30% performance improvement for 32-bit ARM systems. But even x86 64-bit systems should see 0~10% performance improvements with Go 1.8.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Google
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More in Tux Machines

ONAP Rolls Out Amsterdam Release

Less than nine months after AT&T and the Linux Foundation merged their open source projects to become the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP), the group today rolled out its first code release, Amsterdam. The highly anticipated release, which integrates AT&T’s ECOMP and the Linux Foundation’s Open-O code bases into a common open source orchestration platform, aims to automate the virtualization of network services. Read more

Inspiring the Next Generation of Open Source

The Linux Foundation works through our projects, training and certification programs, events and more to bring people of all backgrounds into open source. We meet a lot of people, but find the drive and enthusiasm of some of our youngest community members to be especially infectious. In the past couple of months, we’ve invited 13-year-old algorithmist and cognitive developer Tanmay Bakshi, 11-year-old hacker and cybersecurity ambassador Reuben Paul, and 15-year-old programmer Keila Banks to speak at Linux Foundation conferences. In 2014 when he was 12, Zachary Dupont wrote a letter to his hero Linus Torvalds. We arranged for Zach to meet Linus–a visit that helped clinch his love for Linux. This year, Zach came to Open Source Summit in Los Angeles to catch up with Linus and let us know what he’s been up to. He’s kept busy with an internship at SAP and early acceptance to the Computer Networking and Digital Forensics program at the Delaware County Technical School. Read more

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

  • Debian package depicts 'Tux the penguin' with sheep in intimate ASCII
    A Debian software package containing an "ASCII representation of zoophilia" has been installed automatically on some users' machines. According to a bug report, Debian user Felicia Hummel installed a package called "cowsay", which turns text into ASCII art of cows (or other animals) with speech or thought balloons. But with default settings of "install suggests" enabled, a controversial second "recommends" package called "cowsay-off" was also installed.
  • Join us at the Ubuntu Enterprise Summit!
    Bloomberg, Walmart, eBay, Samsung, Dell. Ever wonder how some of the world’s largest enterprises run on Ubuntu? This December, we are hosting our first ever Ubuntu Enterprise Summit to tell you how and help guide your own organisation whether it be running the cloud in a large telco to deriving revenue from your next IoT initiative. The Ubuntu Enterprise Summit is a two day event of webinars on December 5th and 6th where you can join Canonical’s product managers, technical leads, partners and customers to get an inside look at why some of the world’s largest companies have chosen Ubuntu. Whether you are focused on the cloud or are living life at the edge, the webinars will also look at trends and the considerations for your organisation when implementing such technologies. To kick off the event on December 5th, Canonical CEO and founder Mark Shuttleworth will deliver a keynote talk on 21st Century Infrastructure. Following Mark’s opening, there will be a series of other events and you can register now for those that spark your interest by clicking on the links below
  • Ubuntu Server Development Summary – 21 Nov 2017
    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list.
  • Late Post For Ubuntu Community Appreciation Day 2017
    I am also very thankful for LaTeX2e and Tex Live. It has been a great thing to have to prepare devotional materials for church. I am thankful for the MOTU folks maintaining Gummi which is the editor I use on Xubuntu. Xubuntu is what I run on my laptop that goes many places with me. Tex Live is run both on the laptop and on the Raspberry Pi 2 at home.

Tizen: India, Games, Update