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Google's Chromebit Turns Any TV Into a Chrome PC for Under $100

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Linux
Google

Google just introduced a whole new kind of Chrome OS computer—a dongle that plugs into any HDMI-equipped display. It’s called a Chromebit, and it isn’t your run-of-the-mill streaming stick. For under $100, you’re looking at a full computer that plugs right into your TV.

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Hisense And Haier Launch $149 Chromebooks

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GNU
Linux
Google

A few weeks ago Google made headlines with the launch of the new Chromebook Pixel, the highest-end Chromebook on the market (and with a price to show for it). Today, the Chrome OS laptop ecosystem is launching two products that are the exact opposite: the Haier Chromebook 11 (now available online at Amazon) and the Hisense Chromebook (now available at Walmart). Both of these 11.6-inch Chromebooks will retail for $149, making them the most affordable Chromebooks yet.

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Also: Hands on: The $149 Hisense Chromebook succeeds at being incredibly affordable

Chromebook pilot tests open source learning resources

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Two teachers in Cumberland County are offering up their classrooms as testing ground for new technology. Students in Sarah Pharris' seventh-grade language arts students and Jackie Hancock's seventh-grade math students are using Chromebooks and a variety of Google learning tools to facilitate instruction in their classrooms.

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Material Design, Google Now Support and Timezone Autoupdate Will Come to Chrome OS

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GNU
Linux
Google

Google has announced a couple of days ago, on March 27, that the Chrome OS Beta channel is now open to anyone daring to test the upcoming major release of the Linux kernel-based operating system designed for Chromebooks, which will bring a number of attractive features.

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Why Android 5.1 Is A Step Up From Android 5.0

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Android
Google

One of the major modifications in Android's newest system update, revolves around the 'quick settings' menu. For those who aren't aware, sliding down the notifications bar twice(or once with two fingers), brings up a quick settings menu, within which one can toggle settings like screen brightness, WiFi, Bluetooth, a flashlight, airplane mode, auto rotate settings, location, screen casting etc. Additionally, in Android 5.0, activating a specific toggle led to it being added to the quick settings menu, the first time they're activated. In Android 5.1 however, it is possible to hide these icons with a long press.

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Head 2 Head: Android OS vs. Chrome OS

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Android
Google

A large part of Google’s OS success hasn’t been because of its awesomeness. No. Frankly, we think nothing speaks louder than the almighty dollar in this world. But both are “free,” right? So this is tie? Not really. Although Android is technically free since Google doesn’t charge device makers for it, there are costs associated with getting devices “certified.” Oh, yeah, and then there’s Apple and Microsoft, both of which get healthy payouts from device makers through patent lawsuits. Microsoft reportedly makes far more from Android sales than Windows Phone sales. You just generally don’t see the price because it’s abstracted by carriers. Chrome OS, on the other hand, actually is pretty much free. A top-ofthe-line Chromebook is $280, while a top-of-the-line Android phone full retail is usually $600. We’re giving this one to Chrome OS because if it’s generally cheaper for the builder, it’s cheaper for you.

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Bazel: Google Build Tool is now Open Source

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Google
OSS

Bazel, the tool that Google uses to build the majority of its software has been partially open sourced. According to Google, Bazel is aimed to build “code quickly and reliably” and is “critical to Google’s ability to continue to scale its software development practices as the company grows.”

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Also: Q&A: Databases, Open Source & Virtualisation with CEO Vinay Joosery

Google makes deploying software on its cloud a trivial task

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Google

Google is offering a new incentive for using its Google Compute Engine. With Google Cloud Launcher, you can launch more than 120 popular open-source packages.

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Google Makes Open Source Tablet To Help Doctors Fight Ebola

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Android
Google

He contacted a colleague Ivan Gayton who also works for MSF, to see what could be done. Ivan Gayton decided to contact Google, who had assisted him before during a cholera epidemic, to see if they could help. Google.org, which is Google’s charitable organization, sprung into action by tapping its Crisis response team. This response team gathered resources and personnel together from around the world and brought them to London to work on the project. The result was an Android tablet that ran on top of open-source software and constructed out of a polycarbonate material. The polycarbonate material allows the tablet to be dipped in chlorine and sanitized so that it can leave the facility. This table is used to take information and send it wirelessly to servers located at the scene. These servers are run by a generator for power, as some of the places that MSF responds to do not have electrical power.

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ASUS C201 Chromebook with Rockchip RK3288 SoC Coming Soon

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GNU
Linux
Google

We have been hearing rumors about affordable Chromebooks powered by Rockchip processors ever since last year, but we are yet to see something palpable in this regard.

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Canonical Publishes Impressive Roadmap for All of Their Ubuntu Products

Canonical is working on multiple projects at the same time, and it's often difficult to understand their plans, but Director of Product Strategy Engineering Olli Ries has shed some light on how their inner workings are structured and how things are evolving, from the inside out. Read more

Making the Case for Koha: Why Libraries Should Consider an Open Source ILS

When Engard educates people on what open source is, what it means to use open source software, what types of software are available, which companies use it, and who trusts it, they see that their fears are unfounded, she says. To back up her discussions with facts, she maintains bibliographies on open source and open source security. She also has a set of bookmarks on Delicious, and she wrote a book, Practical Open Source Software for Libraries. “[W]hen people come to me and say open source is too risky … I have facts and figures, just what librarians want, to say no, all software has potential risk associated with it. You have to evaluate software side by side, and look at it, and really take the time to compare it. … I know you’re going to pick the open source solution over the proprietary because it is so quickly developed, so quickly fixed, so ahead of the curve as far as technology is concerned.” Read more

Review of Ubuntu Phone – A Work Still Under Progress

However, what one must remember is that the Ubuntu Phone is still a work in progress. The company is issuing updates every month and is relying on its current user base regarding the feedback and ideas. Right now, only three Ubuntu phones are present in the market ranging from $186 to $328 roughly. Ubuntu has been in hibernation mode for the development of this OS for a long time and it looked like they might be consumer ready now, however, after seeing the Ubuntu Phone it looks like they might be far from that scenario right now. Read more

Android M news: Release date delayed, to come out in September or October?

Google reveals that the newest Android operating system initially codenamed as "Android M" will be delaying the release of Android M Developer Preview 3 for selected Nexus devices. The information was shared by the company's employee and moderator Wojtek Kaliciński on the Developer community page in Google+. Read more