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Google

Google Introduces Guetzli

Filed under
Google
OSS
  • Announcing Guetzli: A New Open Source JPEG Encoder

    At Google, we care about giving users the best possible online experience, both through our own services and products and by contributing new tools and industry standards for use by the online community. That’s why we’re excited to announce Guetzli, a new open source algorithm that creates high quality JPEG images with file sizes 35% smaller than currently available methods, enabling webmasters to create webpages that can load faster and use even less data.

  • Guetzli: Google Rolls Out A New JPEG Encoder

    Google has announced Guetzli, not a German cookie, but rather a new open-source algorithm for creating high-quality JPEGs that are 35% smaller than currently available methods.

  • Google releases open source 'Guetzli' JPEG encoder

    Google is one of the biggest champions of open source. Not only does the search giant use open source software in its products, but it contributes to the community too. There are many projects made open source by the company, which helps the greater good.

    Today, Google releases yet another open source project. Called "Guetzli," it is a JPEG encoder that aims to produce even smaller image file sizes. In fact, the search giant claims a whopping 35 percent improvement over existing JPEG compression. If you are wondering why smaller file sizes are important, it is quite simple -- the web. If websites can embed smaller images, users can experience faster load times while using less data.

Chrome and Firefox

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web

GSoC 2017

Filed under
Google
OSS
  • Netfilter in GSoC 2017

    Great news! The Netfilter project has been elected by Google to be a mentoring organization in this year Google Summer of Code program. Following the pattern of the last years, Google seems to realise and support the importance of this software project in the Linux ecosystem.

  • Over 200 Open Source Orgs Mentoring GSoC 2017

    The list of mentoring organizations for this year's Google Summer of Code has been posted and there's a record number of them. The list includes large and well known projects together with smaller and less familiar ones.

How Ubuntu is helping to optimize Google Cloud

Filed under
Google
Software
Interviews
Ubuntu

While the products that Ubuntu provides — such as Canonical Livepatch Service and Juju — are well-known in the cloud community, its corporate stance is not as recognized. It’s hoping to change that perception.

“Ubuntu is a very popular [operating system], and we are most dominant in public cloud,” explained Udi Nachmany, vice president of public cloud at Ubuntu.

Read more

Microsoft’s browsers are shedding users, new Firefox for Ubuntu, Firefox axes Windows XP support

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web

Chromebooks Are Spreading

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gentoo
Google
  • Best Chromebooks for business 2017: Should I buy a Chromebook? Chromebook buying advice

    Instead of running Microsoft Windows or Mac OS X, Chromebooks support Google's Chrome operating system (OS), meaning that these machines are entirely internet and cloud-based.

    Good for those familiar with the Chrome web browser and the Google productivity suite (Docs, Sheets, Slides), not so good for those wanting to perform heavy duty tasks with external applications.

    But keep an open mind, if you're looking for a cheap laptop to perform internet-based tasks, such as emails or web browsing, the Chromebook could be a viable option or a great option for a second machine.

    Read on to find out the best Chromebooks for business...

  • Apple’s Devices Lose Luster in American Classrooms

    Apple is losing its grip on American classrooms, which technology companies have long used to hook students on their brands for life.

    Over the last three years, Apple’s iPads and Mac notebooks — which accounted for about half of the mobile devices shipped to schools in the United States in 2013 — have steadily lost ground to Chromebooks, inexpensive laptops that run on Google’s Chrome operating system and are produced by Samsung, Acer and other computer makers.

  • Apple Losing Out to Microsoft and Google in U.S. Classrooms [iophk: "weird-ass spin there in the title. Apple is really losing to Google, Microsoft is treading water instead."]

    According to research company Futuresource Consulting, in 2016 the number of devices in American classrooms that run iOS and macOS fell to third place behind both Google-powered laptops and Windows devices.

Google Summer of Code

Filed under
Google
OSS

Review: Google Pixel is Android at its best (if a little boring)

Filed under
Android
Google
Reviews

The Pixel’s designs have been divisive ever since the first batch of leaks hit the interwebs, but I’ve grown quite fond of it. Maybe it’s the fact that my ‘Really Blue’ (provided to us by Verizon, thanks folks) model is in fact so incredibly blue, but really I just think the two tone look stands out. It’s instantly recognizable if you’ve seen the phone before.

Read more

Google's Upspin Debuts

Filed under
Google
OSS
  • Another option for file sharing

    Existing mechanisms for file sharing are so fragmented that people waste time on multi-step copying and repackaging. With the new project Upspin, we aim to improve the situation by providing a global name space to name all your files. Given an Upspin name, a file can be shared securely, copied efficiently without "download" and "upload", and accessed by anyone with permission from anywhere with a network connection.

  • Google Developing "Upspin" Framework For Naming/Sharing Files

    Google today announced an experimental project called Upspin that's aiming for next-generation file-sharing in a secure manner.

  • Google releases open source file sharing project 'Upspin' on GitHub

    Believe it or not, in 2017, file-sharing between individuals is not a particularly easy affair. Quite frankly, I had a better experience more than a decade ago sending things to friends and family using AOL Instant Messenger. Nowadays, everything is so fragmented, that it can be hard to share.

    Today, Google unveils yet another way to share files. Called "Upspin," the open source project aims to make sharing easier for home users. With that said, the project does not seem particularly easy to set up or maintain. For example, it uses Unix-like directories and email addresses for permissions. While it may make sense to Google engineers, I am dubious that it will ever be widely used.

  • Google devs try to create new global namespace

    Wouldn't it be nice if there was a universal and consistent way to give names to files stored on the Internet, so they were easy to find? A universal resource locator, if you like?

    The problem is that URLs have been clunkified, so Upspin, an experimental project from some Google engineers, offers an easier model: identifying files to users and paths, and letting the creator set access privileges.

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More in Tux Machines

Meltdown and Spectre Linux Kernel Status - Update

I keep getting a lot of private emails about my previous post previous post about the latest status of the Linux kernel patches to resolve both the Meltdown and Spectre issues. These questions all seem to break down into two different categories, “What is the state of the Spectre kernel patches?”, and “Is my machine vunlerable?” Read more

today's leftovers

OSS: Jio, VMware Openwashing, and Testing Jobs

  • Jio is committed to use open source technology: Akash Ambani
    Speaking at the India Digital Open Summit 2018, Akash Ambani, Director of Reliance Jio Infocomm, said that open source is very important for his company. “The year 2017 was the tipping point for AR and VR globally. In India, AR and VR are in the initial stages of adoption but at Jio, we believe it will grow at a 50 percent compounded rate for the next five years,” Akash said. He also spoke on the evolution of artificial intelligence and blockchain.
  • VMware and Pivotal’s PKS Distribution Marries Kubernetes with BOSH [Ed: It looks like the author has been reduced to Microsoft propaganda and other openwashing puff pieces sponsored by proprietary software giants. We have given up on several writers who used to support GNU/Linux. Seeing their activity, it seems as though they ended up with neither gigs nor credibility (used to get far more writing assignments from LF, often for Microsoft openwashing).]
  • Hehe, still writing code for a living? It's 2018. You could be earning x3 as a bug bounty hunter
    Ethical hacking to find security flaws appears to pay better, albeit less regularly, than general software engineering. And while payment remains one of the top rationales for breaking code, hackers have begun citing more civic-minded reasons for their activities. A survey of 1,700 bug bounty hunters from more than 195 countries and territories by security biz HackerOne, augmented by the company's data on 900 bug bounty programs, has found that white-hat hackers earn a median salary that's 2.7 times that of typical software engineers in their home countries. In some places, the gap is far more pronounced. In India, for example, hackers make as much as 16 times the median programmer salary. In the US, they earn 2.4 times the median.

Security: Spectre and Meltdown, Industrial System Sabotage, VDP, Windows in Healthcare

  • Some thoughts on Spectre and Meltdown
     

    Contrast that with what happened this time around. Google discovered a problem and reported it to Intel, AMD, and ARM on June 1st. Did they then go around contacting all of the operating systems which would need to work on fixes for this? Not even close. FreeBSD was notified the week before Christmas, over six months after the vulnerabilities were discovered. Now, FreeBSD can occasionally respond very quickly to security vulnerabilities, even when they arise at inconvenient times — on November 30th 2009 a vulnerability was reported at 22:12 UTC, and on December 1st I provided a patch at 01:20 UTC, barely over 3 hours later — but that was an extremely simple bug which needed only a few lines of code to fix; the Spectre and Meltdown issues are orders of magnitude more complex.  

  • Menacing Malware Shows the Dangers of Industrial System Sabotage
     

    At the S4 security conference on Thursday, researchers from the industrial control company Schneider Electric, whose equipment Triton targeted, presented deep analysis of the malware—only the third recorded cyberattack against industrial equipment. Hackers [sic] were initially able to introduce malware into the plant because of flaws in its security procedures that allowed access to some of its stations, as well as its safety control network.

  • 25 per cent of hackers don't report bugs due to lack of disclosure policies
     

    One of the standout discoveries was that almost 25 per cent of respondents said they were unable to disclose a security flaw because the bug-ridden company in question lacked a vulnerability disclosure policy (VDP).

  • 'Professional' hack [sic] on Norwegian health authority compromises data of three million patients [iophk: "Windows TCO"]