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Google

I bought my mom a Chromebook Pixel and everything is so much better now

Filed under
Linux
Google

The problem: most of the Chromebooks on the market feel cheap. They're generally marketed as secondary computers, so they're made to be inexpensive, and that means almost all of them are made of cheap-feeling plastic. There's nothing wrong with that, but I needed to pass the sleek test. The only viable option was Google's own Chromebook Pixel, which is an amazingly beautiful machine that's ridiculously expensive by most normal standards, because it's a thousand-dollar computer that just runs Chrome. It sounds insane: most tech products that cost a thousand dollars do many, many more things than simply running a web browser. I spent weeks tossing the idea around every chance I got, just to see if it would ever sound less like I was slowly going crazy.

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Google peddles Linux based load balancer to open sourcers

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Linux
Google
OSS

Google has developed an open source infrastructure software build using its Go language.

The ad-flinger has released the Seesaw load balancer for Linux, built to replace two existing systems.

Code has been released to GitHub here.

Google’s site reliability engineer, Joel Sing, blogged that Seesaw would increase the availability of service and reduce the management overhead.

“We are pleased to be able to make this platform available to the rest of the world and hope that other enterprises will be able to benefit,” Sing wrote.

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Seesaw Liberated

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Google
  • Google’s ‘Seesaw’ Load Balancer Goes Open Source

    If you’re a network or systems administrator, you’re likely familiar with the concept of a load balancer. It’s a hardware device or software stack that distributes network application load across all the machines and servers connected to it in order to help mitigate network congestion. Google’s software solution, called Seesaw, was created in 2012 in response to a lack of adequate load balancing software for Google’s own use. Coded in Google’s own Go language, the software boasted a flexible Linux backbone and was used to manage Google’s own network needs, which entailed things like automated deployment and ease of use and maintenance.

  • Google Open Sources Its Seesaw Load Balancer

    Google announced today that it is open-sourcing Seesaw — a Linux-based load balancing system. The code for the project, which is written in Google’s Go language, is now available on GitHub under the Apache license.

    As Google Site Reliability Engineer Joel Sing, who works on the company’s corporate infrastructure, writes in today’s announcement, Google used to use two different load balancing systems back in 2012. Both, however, “presented different sets of management and stability challenges.” So to fix this, he and his team set out to find a new solution and because the ones available at the time didn’t meet Google’s needs, they started writing their own.

Google deep learning capabilities heading to Android, creating phones that can think like people

Filed under
Android
Google

Your next Android phone might be able to see like a real human being.

Google has announced that it is to integrated deep learning into its phone operating system, allowing the phones to use algorithms to recognise what is in pictures and think about it like a person.

The company has begun a tie-up with Movidius, a company that makes chips that help with “machine vision”. The two companies have already worked together on Google’s Project Tango, which uses a series of cameras to allow computers to be able to see spaces in 3D.

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How Google backed an open source winner

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Google
OSS

It’s hard to fault the pedigree of Google’s Kubernetes container management tool, and it seems many of the world’s cloud-forward enterprises agree.

Inspired by Borg – Google’s internal container management software, which manages the two billion-plus containers the web giant starts each week – Kubernetes has scale in its DNA.

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Desktop GNU/Linux and Chrome OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Chrome 32-bit

Filed under
Google
Web

Google Open Sources Dataflow Analytics Code through Apache Incubator

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Google
OSS

Google is open-sourcing more code by contributing Cloud Dataflow to the Apache Software Foundation. The move, a first for Google, opens new cloud-based data analytics options and integration opportunities for big data companies.

Cloud Dataflow is a platform for processing large amounts of data in the cloud. It features an open source, Java-based SDK, which makes it easy to integrate with other cloud-centric analytics and Big Data tools.

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Google Asks Chromixium OS Devs to Cease Use of the Name, Cub Linux Is Born

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Linux
Google

It has been a while since we last heard something from the Chromixium Linux project, an operating system based on Ubuntu Linux and designed from the ground up to look like Google's Chrome OS.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME News

  • Wayland ♡ drawing tablets
    So this is finally happening. The result of much work all through the stack from several dedicated individuals (You know who you are!) started lining up during the past few months and now is hitting master. Early in the cycle I blogged about stylus support being merged, based on the first version of the tablet protocols. Now I have the pleasure to declare GTK+ tablet support on Wayland feature complete.
  • GNOME/GTK Support For Drawing Tablets On Wayland Is Feature Complete
    In time for next month's GNOME 3.22 release, the drawing tablet support for GNOME on Wayland is getting into shape. GNOME developer Carlos Garnacho wrote today how it's "finally happening" that good support for drawing tablets when running GNOME on Wayland is becoming a reality. Carlos declares that the GTK+ tablet support on Wayland is considered feature complete.
  • Mutter Window Manager Updated for GNOME 3.22 with Virtual Input Device Support
    GNOME Project's Florian Müllner announced the release of the Beta build of the upcoming Mutter window and compositing manager for the GNOME 3.22 desktop environment. As reported by us earlier today, the GNOME 3.22 desktop environment entered Beta stages of development, which means that most of its core components and applications have been updated to this Beta release, including Mutter, which is in charge of displaying and managing your GNOME desktop via OpenGL (accelerated 3D graphics).

KDE Leftovers

  • KDE Plasma 5.7.4 Released
    KDE Plasma 5.7.4 fixes dragging items in Kickoff, mouse settings now apply to applications using kdelibs4, and there is improved handling of CRTC screen information. There are also a number of KWin fixes (including one Wayland fix), Plasma desktop tweaks, and more.
  • QtCon Keynote: Software as a Public Service
    QtCon is happy to welcome Julia Reda, the closing keynote speaker. Member of the European Parliament for the Pirate Party and Vice-Chair of the Greens/European Free Alliance. Reda's legislative focus is on copyright and internet policy issues. As a member of the European Parliament and together with Max Andersson, Julia Reda initiated the pilot project “Governance and quality of software code – Auditing of free and open source software” in 2014 as a reaction to the so-called “heartbleed” bug in OpenSSL. The idea turned into the pilot-project "Free and Open Source Software Auditing“ (FOSSA) that is aiming at improving the security of those Free Software programs that are in use by the European Commission and the Parliament.
  • KScreen-Doctor Will Help KDE Developers Improve Multi-Screen Plasma
    Also helping KDE developers in their multi-screen efforts is a centralized activity log in KScreen with Plasma 5.8 and the ability to easily create virtual screens in Wayland for reproducing issues without real hardware.
  • Multisceen in Plasma: Improved tools and debugging
    Plasma 5.8 will be our first long-term supported release in the Plasma 5 series. We want to make this a release as polished and stable as possible. One area we weren’t quite happy with was our multi-screen user experience. While it works quite well for most of our users, there were a number of problems which made our multi-screen support sub-par. Let’s take a step back to define what we’re talking about.

Linux Graphics

EXT4, Btrfs, XFS & NILFS2 HDD File-System Tests On Linux 4.8 (and More Linux Kernel News)

Up until running the tests for today's article, I can't remember the last time I touched a hard drive... It's been many months ago at least. Nearly all of our tests at Phoronix are from solid state storage, but I decided to pick up a new HDD for running some Linux file-system tests on a conventional hard drive for those not having an SSD. Via NewEgg.com I saw a good deal on a refurbished Hitachi Ultrastar HUA72302 "Enterprise" Hard Drive with 2TB of storage, 7200 RPM, 64MB cache, Serial ATA 3.0, and backed by HGST with a five-year warranty. For just over $30 USD it was a deal and decided to order it for running some modern Linux HDD file-system tests for curiosity sake. Read more Also: What's Been Going On With CPUFreq & The Scheduler Polychromatic Provides A Nice UI To Razer Keyboards/Mice On Linux