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Google killing Chrome for 32-bit Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • Google killing Chrome for 32-bit Linux

    If you live in the web browser, using a Linux-based operating system makes a lot of sense. By combining say, Ubuntu and Google Chrome, you can have a very secure and easy-to-use platform running the world's best web browser. A bloated and heavy Windows 10, for instance, could be unnecessary.

  • Google ends 32-bit Linux support for Chrome

    The first signs of the end of 32bit are on the wall - starting with Linux. I wonder how long Google will continue to support 32bit Chrome on Windows. For some strange reason, Microsoft is still selling 32bit Windows 10.

  • Google Decides to End Support for Google Chrome on 32-bit Linux OSes

    The brief announcement was made an hour ago by Dirk Pranke on the Chromium-dev group, and it informs users of Ubuntu and Debian GNU/Linux distributions that starting with March 2016, the Google Chrome web browser will no longer be available for 32-bit hardware platforms.

Mozilla: we’re not getting money from Google any more but we’re doing fine

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Google
Moz/FF

For many years, Firefox developer Mozilla generated substantial income from a sponsorship deal with Google; the search and advertising firm paid Mozilla in return for Firefox making Google its default search engine. That deal was ended last year, with Firefox defaulting to Yahoo in the US, Yandex in Russia, and Baidu in China.

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Google Kubernetes Is an Open-Source Software Hit

Filed under
Google
OSS

Google Inc. has an open-source software hit on its hands.

Google has capitalized on the growing popularity of so-called containers, which are standardized building blocks of code that easily can be moved around the Internet and across a broad range of devices. In June 2014, as containers were taking off in the world of software development, Google open sourced Kubernetes, its technology for managing clusters of containers. Since then, Google has captured about 80% of the market for cluster managers, according to consulting firm Cloud Technology Partners Inc.

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Google To Donate Up To $1 Million Toward Education In Android Pay Charity Campaign

Filed under
Android
Google

In an effort to kickstart its mobile payments solution, Android Pay, Google this morning announced a holiday campaign that will see the tech giant donating up to a million dollars toward special education projects in partnership with nonprofit DonorsChoose.org. This is the first time Google has ever worked with an NGO on a mobile payments campaign, the company notes.

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Asus Chromebit CS10

Filed under
Linux
Google

ASUS Chromebit CS10 is the latest computer-on-a-stick.

It’s about the size of a candy bar and as you can already guess from its name, it runs Google’s Chrome OS, the same Cloud-based operating system that powers Chromebooks and Chromeboxes.

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Google Nexus 6P review: The Android flagship phone to go for

Filed under
Android
Google
Reviews

If you have read the review completely, you may have seen some words quite often such as smooth, fast, quick. In the Android ecosystem, the Google Nexus 6P clearly stands much higher than other flagship competition. The Samsung Galaxy S6 series is the only true competitor to the Nexus 6P. But the Nexus 6P has one weapon which is still to come to competition – Android 6.0 Marshmallow!

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What's the Future of the Chromebook?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

There has been no shortage of stories over the few weeks speculating on the potential end of the Chrome OS. Google vigorously denied those rumors, but now there's renewed talk of Alphabet (Google's parent company) creating a new version of Android for desktop computing.

Of course, we've already seen a spate of Android-based laptops. Most have come and gone quickly over the past few years, although HP's Slatebook is still around.

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TensorFlow

Filed under
Google
OSS

Google Tries an Android for Machine Learning, Releasing Open Source AI System

Filed under
Google
OSS

Hence TensorFlow, a machine-learning system that Google has used internally for a few years. Today, Google is taking it open source, releasing the software parameters to fellow engineers, academics and hacks with enough coding chops.

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Google is giving away a big part of its machine learning software

Filed under
Google
OSS

Google has just announced that it's open sourcing TensorFlow under the Apache 2 license. That awfully nerdy sentence means that part of the software that Google uses to power its machine learning systems — the stuff that can translate words on a sign with your camera or learn what a cat looks like just by looking at a ton of photos — will now be free for anybody to use or alter.

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Text for Linux users who just happen to be standing on their heads

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Discover in Plasma 5.7

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Sirin Labs' Solarin is today's most ridiculous $16,000 Android phone

How much do you value your privacy? Sirin Labs is a new company making its debut in London today that stakes its future on very wealthy people believing their privacy and security to be priceless. Its launch product is the Solarin, a 5.5-inch Android smartphone accompanied by a series of bombastic claims about being the very best. It should be the very best, given that it costs £9,500 before taxes, but in my time trying it out today, I was left with the unhappy impression of an expensive imposter. Read more