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Games for GNU/Linux

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Google
  • RAD Game's New Oodle Data Compression Beats Open-Source Alternatives

    The latest work on RAD Game Tools' Oodle data compression with new compression codecs have it handily beating the open-source alternatives.

    There's been much interest in recent times around the open-source Google Brotli project as well as Zstd and others, but the latest work done by RAD Game Tools to their commercial and proprietary compression tech is now putting the open-source lossless compression alternatives further behind.

  • First Release!!! [Ed: Voxel Quest Open Sourced]

    It is the moment you have all been waiting for!...ish. I am sticking one toe in the water and putting out a very, very unpolished release of the very first version of the engine (the isometric engine, which differs from what I previously said I would release first, due to demand). Other versions are to follow. It was a fair amount of work to prep just this release, as unpolished as it is. And there are many things wrong, which I am mostly aware of (see the README.md). As noted, the point was not to make a perfect release, the point was to get the code in your hands as fast as possible (and I am sorry it has taken this long for me to get it out!).

  • Total War: WARHAMMER is still coming to Linux, being ported by Feral Interactive

    We already knew that Total War: WARHAMMER was coming to Linux, but we didn’t know when as it seemed like it was forgotten about. Now we know it’s being ported by Feral Interactive!

    This is good news, as I’ve been pretty happy with Feral’s porting work and their support of their products has been top notch. Pleased to see them get more porting work to continue pushing our platform.

    Hopefully I will be able to do my usual thing of giving it a run over before release, if not, I will try to after release.

Chromebooks, Chrome, Android, and Google

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Android
Google

Google beefs Linux up kernel defenses in Android

Filed under
Android
Linux
Google

Future versions of Android will be more resilient to exploits thanks to developers' efforts to integrate the latest Linux kernel defenses into the operating system.

Android's security model relies heavily on the Linux kernel that sits at its core. As such, Android developers have always been interested in adding new security features that are intended to prevent potentially malicious code from reaching the kernel, which is the most privileged area of the operating system.

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LaunchKit Now FOSS

Filed under
Android
Google
OSS
  • Google acquires LaunchKit to make life easier for Android developers
  • LaunchKit team heads to Google and open-sources its tools for helping devs launch their apps

    The team behind LaunchKit, a set of tools that helps developers launch their apps, is heading to Google and joining the Developer Product Group.

    It doesn’t look like LaunchKit’s products are moving over to Google, so the team decided to open-source its products and make them available on GitHub. LaunchKit’s hosted services will be available for the next 12 months. After that, they will be discontinued.

    LaunchKit currently offers four tools and developers will now be able to take them and run them themselves: Screenshot Builder for easily creating annotated screenshots for Apple’s and Google’s store, App Website Builder for creating responsive landing pages for new apps, Review Monitor for — well… — tracking reviews in Apple’s App Store, and Sales Reporter for keeping track of sales. The team has also written a couple of how-to guides for developers, too.

In a Quiet Market for PCs, Chromebooks are Marching Steadily Forward

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gentoo
Google

It's no secret that Chrome OS has not been the same striking success for Google that the Android OS has been. And yet, Chromebooks--portable computers running the platform--have not only found their niche, but they are also introducing a new generation to cloud computing. Chromebooks are firmly entrenched in the education market, where many young users have become used to the convention of storing apps and data in the cloud.

Now, according to new research from Gartner, Chromebooks are ready to hit new milestones. Analysts there report that Chromebook shipment growth will be in the double digits this year. At the same time, though, Chromebooks have not become fixtures in the enterprise, replacing Windows PCs.

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Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Google
  • Google Developers Improve Mesa's Android EGL Support
  • Nouveau DRM Code Updated For Linux 4.8

    The Nouveau open-source NVIDIA DRM driver changes have been queued in DRM-Next for the Linux 4.8 kernel.

    Nouveau updates this time around include GK20A/GM20B Tegra K1/X1 voltage and clock improvements as well as initial support for GP100 and GP104 GPUs. The latter provides initial KMS support for the GeForce GTX 1000 series. While NVIDIA did release some Pascal firmware, it ended up being only for the GP100 and not the GP104 or GP106. Thus with Linux 4.8 there isn't any hardware-accelerated support for the consumer GeForce GTX 1060/1070/1080 cards on the open-source driver stack. For those cards it comes down to un-accelerated kernel mode-setting support until NVIDIA releases the rest of the Pascal firmware in the future.

Managing your containers at Google scale

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
Google

The tooling around Linux containers has matured to the point that they are now a viable method of software packaging and deployment. The developer side of the containers equation has gotten a lot of emphasis. However, in order for containers to be a complete solution, they must not only be easy to build, but easy to deploy reliably at scale.

A company that arguably has more experience than any other company in deploying Linux containers at scale is Google. They have been running conatiners in their own datacenters for over a decade, contributing to the upstream Linux kernel in the areas of cgroups and namespaces. Using an internal system named Borg, Google deploys about 2 billion containers per week.

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Debian Family

  • Devuan GNU/Linux 1.0.0 "Jessie" Just Around the Corner, Release Candidate Out
    It's been five almost five months since the developers behind the Debian-based Devuan GNU/Linux operating system launched the second Beta version towards the first stable release of the OS, and they now announced the Release Candidate. The Devuan project continues its vision of providing a libre Debian fork without using the systemd init system, and the Release Candidate (RC) version brings the GNU/Linux distribution closer to a final release. The interesting fact is that this RC appears to be stable enough to be used for production work.
  • Budgie 10.3 Released, Here’s How to Install it on Ubuntu
    A new version of the Budgie desktop is available to install on Ubuntu. Budgie 10.3 adds a new Alt+Tab switcher, and brings a stack of bug fixes to the table.
  • Ubuntu 17.10 Codename Released "Artful Aardvark"
  • openHAB
    Partners Canonical, openHAB Foundation and Azul Systems have collaborated hard to drive development of the new openHAB 2.0 smart-home platform as a snap package. An alternative to Apple Homekit and Samsung SmartThings, openHAB from openHAB Foundation is completely free and open source, and acts as a control hub for home IoT setups.