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Ubuntu

Linux Mint KDE Still Possible

Filed under
KDE
Ubuntu

If you're the Linux Mint and KDE lover, then you know that starting from Linux Mint 19 "Tara", your beloved Linux distro has stopped shipping with KDE. So Linux Mint KDE has died a brutal death. But we can revive the combination of the two best software, i.e. Linux Mint on KDE.
In this article, I will show you how you can install KDE on Linux Mint 19 or possibly any other distro gets released after Linux Mint 19 "Tara". I personally love the combination of two software. Linux Mint is the best Linux distro not only for Linux beginners but in almost all aspects of computing, Linux mint fits very well. On the other hand, KDE is one of the most customizable Linux desktop environments that we've ever had.

​Although, KDE might not be the best for ancient PCs or laptops. It prefers looks and the ability to customize the system a little more than performance. So if you have a decent computer, one bought in the current decade, you can try out KDE.

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Ubuntu 19.04 Updates - 7 Things To Know

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 19.04 is scheduled to arrive in another 30 days. I've been using it for the past week or so, and even as a pre-beta, the OS is pretty stable and not buggy at all. Here are a bunch of things you should know about the yet to be officially released Ubuntu 19.04.

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From Trusty to Bionic - my Ultrabook story

Filed under
Ubuntu

I am happy with how the upgrade went, given that I've actually bumped the system two major releases. Apart from small issues, there was nothing cardinal in the move. No data loss, no complications, no crashes. All my stuff remains intact, and so does Windows 8, living happily together and sharing the disk with Ubuntu. Mission accomplished.

But we ain't done. I need to make the system as usable as possible. Which means Unity testing - and Plasma testing, of course, duh! Indeed, this remains a productivity box, and as such, it must fulfill some very stringent requirements. It must be stable, fast and elegant. It must work with me every step of the way, and it must allow me to transparently and seamlessly use various programs that I need. On this particular machine, that would be video editing with Kdenlive, that would be image processing with GIMP, the use of encryption and VPN tools, tons of writing on the superbly ergonomic Asus keyboard. But all that and more - coming soon.

For now, thank you Trusty for five sweet, loyal years. May you ReST in ethernet peace.

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Firefox 66 Is Now Available for Ubuntu 18.10, 18.04 LTS, and 16.04 LTS Users

Filed under
Moz/FF
Ubuntu

Released earlier this week, the Mozilla Firefox 66 web browser has landed in Ubuntu's repositories with a bunch of great improvements, such as the hidden system title bar that respects the GNOME guidelines. Not only Firefox will now look good, but you won't have two title bars, nor you'll have to use extensions to get rid of one.

Apart from the looks for GNOME users, which is now the default desktop environment on Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish), Mozilla Firefox 66 comes with various under the hood improvements, such as freezeless downloading of files and faster web content loading by reducing the crash rates and increasing the processes from 4 to 8.

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Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Debug ACPI DSDT and SSDT with ACPICA Utilities

    Using acpidbg on Ubuntu 18.04 x64 can be quite handy; however, the Linux kernel with ACPI_DEBUGGER is not always available, such as on Ubuntu for ARM. In such cases, acpica also provides a set of utilities, named acpica-tools, for ACPI debugging.

  • NVIDIA Jetson Nano is a $99 Computer Built for AI, Powered by Ubuntu

    Sold as a complete compute solution, the Jetson Nano Developer Kit wants to let embedded designers, researchers, and DIY makers harness the power of AI, all at an affordable price.

    A NVIDIA’s JetPack SDK provides a ‘complete desktop Linux environment based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS’, replete with accelerated graphics, NVIDIA CUDA toolkit support, and more.

    NVIDIA say developers will find it “easy” to install leading open-source Machine Learning (ML) frameworks like TensorFlow, Caffe and Keras. Frameworks for computer vision and robotics development like OpenCV and ROS are also available via the SDK.

    The JetPack 4.2 SDK [shipped on the microSD card] provides a complete desktop Linux environment for Jetson Nano based on Ubuntu 18.04 with accelerated graphics, support for NVIDIA CUDA Toolkit 10.0, and libraries such as cuDNN 7.3 and TensorRT 5,” Nvidia says of the nimble Nano dev kit.

    But how powerful is it?

  • Vertical rhythm and spacing in Vanilla Framework 2.0

    Vanilla, the CSS framework behind Canonical’s suite of products and services, has undergone significant changes over the last 12 months. We’ve introduced vertical rhythm, a new type scale, consistent white space in and between elements, and adjustable information density. 

  • Ubuntu 19 04 Desktop Tour of New Features

Debian and Ubuntu, Lies and Marketing

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
Misc
  • Jonathan Carter: Running for DPL

    I am running for Debian Project Leader, my official platform is published on the Debian website (currently looks a bit weird, but a fix is pending publication), with a more readable version available on my website as well as a plain-text version.

    Shortly after I finished writing the first version of my platform page, I discovered an old talk from Ian Murdock at Microsoft Research where he said something that resonated well with me, and I think also my platform.

  • Stephen Michael Kellat: Middle of March Meandering

    Eventually I intend to try Ubuntu Server installations to the three idle Raspberry Pi 3B+ boards. The ultimate goal there is for being able to offload video transcoding.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 570
  • Two-thirds of Android antivirus apps are worthless or worse

    Yes, you may as well change your wallpaper to say "no viruses allowed:" it'd be just as effective as the 170 antivirus products that detected fewer than 30 per cent of the 2000 malicious apps installed for testing purposes.

  • Why foldable smartphones are more fad than forever devices

    I've been a part of many industries and, without fail, each industry eventually resorts to gimmicks to sell a product. In some instances, the gimmick convinces consumers that the new product and is the must-have of the industry.

    [...]

    The smartphone industry is no stranger to such snake-oil salesmanship. We've seen pop-up selfie cameras, Samsung Air View, built-in projectors, the HTC kickstand, the Amazon Fire Phone, the Ubuntu Phone, LG Modules, smart scroll, Alcatel disco lights, Blackberry Storm, Samsung edge display, KnockOn Password, HTC U11, and Pixel squeezable sides.

    The point being, the smartphone industry is keen on bringing to light a plethora of gimmicks to try and woo users away from their current devices.

Canonical Says Ubuntu 14.04 Extended Security Maintenance Begins April 25, 2019

Filed under
Ubuntu

Released five years ago on April 17th, 2014, the Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating system series will reach its end of life next month on April 30th. Following on the success of the Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) operating system series, Canonical announced some time ago that it would offer its Extended Security Maintenance (ESM) commercial package to Ubuntu 14.04 LTS users as well.

Canonical said it would reveal more details about when the ESM (Extended Security Maintenance) offering is available for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), so the company now announced that users who want to continue using the operating system and still receive security updates after the April 30th end of life, can purchase the ESM package beginning April 25th, 2019.

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Canonical Releases Important Linux Kernel Patch for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, Update Now

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

The new Linux kernel security update is here to address five security issues discovered by various security researchers in the Linux 4.4 kernel used in the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series and official derivatives that aren't using the Linux 4.15 HWE (Hardware Enablement) kernel from Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver).

These include a flaw (CVE-2017-18241) in Linux kernel's F2FS file system implementation, which incorrectly handled the noflush_merge mount option, and multiple integer overflows (CVE-2018-7740) in the hugetlbfs implementation. Both issues could allow local attackers to crash the vulnerable system through a denial of service.

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Devices: Ubuntu Core Ported to Developer Kit and Kontron’s New Board

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu
  • Porting Ubuntu Core 18 to Nvidia Jetson TX1 Developer Kit

    Ubuntu Core (UC) is Canonical’s take in the IoT space. There are pre-built images for officially supported devices, like Raspberry Pi or Intel NUCs, but if we have something else and there is no community port, we need to create the UC image ourselves. High level instructions on how to do this are found in the official docs. The process is straightforward once we have two critical components: the kernel and the gadget snap.

  • Stylish but rugged industrial mini-PC runs on Coffee Lake

    Kontron’s “KBox B-201-CFL” is a compact, embedded box PC that runs Linux or Windows on 8th Gen Core CPUs with 2x GbE, SATA and M.2 SSDs, shock, vibration, and EMC tolerance, and a low noise level of under 34 dBA.

    Kontron is introducing a storage-oriented, Coffee Lake based mini-PC built around an unnamed Mini-ITX board. The KBox B-201-CFL follows other KBox industrial PCs including its recent Raspberry Pi powered KBox A-330-RPI and i.MX6 based KBox A-330-MX6. Applications for the stylish, 190 x 190 x 60mm system include image processing, plant data collection, and manufacturing execution systems, as well as more commercial or corporate settings, including music studios.

Ubuntu Studio to Remain Officially Recognized Ubuntu Flavor

Filed under
Ubuntu

During a meeting of the Ubuntu Developer Membership Board on March 11, 2019, two Ubuntu Studio developers, Council Chair Erich Eickmeyer and Council Member Ross Gammon, successfully applied for and received upload rights to Ubuntu Studio’s core packages, fulfilling the requirements prescribed in https://wiki.ubuntu.com/RecognizedFlavors.

We would like to thank the community for staying with us through this uncertain time, and thank the Ubuntu Developer Membership Board for approving Erich and Ross’s applications.

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Also: Debian vs Ubuntu – Their Differences and Similarities

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More in Tux Machines

End of LibrePlanet 2019

  • Questioning and Finding Purpose
    This is copied over from my spiritual blog. I'm nervous doing that, especially at a point when I'm more vulnerable than usual in the Debian community. Still, this is who I am, and I want to be proud of that rather than hide it. And Debian and the free software community are about far more than just the programs we write. So hear goes: The Libreplanet opening keynote had me in tears. It was a talk by Dr. Tarek Loubani. He described his work as an emergency physician in Gaza and how 3d printers and open hardware are helping save lives. They didn't have enough stethoscopes; that was one of the critical needs. So, they imported a 3d printer, used that to print another 3d printer, and then began iterative designs of 3d-printable stethoscopes. By the time they were done, they had a device that performed as well or better than than a commercially available model. What was amazing is that the residents of Gaza could print their own; this didn't introduce dependencies on some external organization. Instead, open/free hardware was used to help give people a sense of dignity, control of some part of their lives, and the ability to better save those who depended on them. Even more basic supplies were unavailable. The lack of tourniquets caused the death of some significant fraction of casualties in the 2014 war. The same solution—3d-printed tourniquets had an even more dramatic result. Dr. Loubani talked about how he felt powerless to change the world around him. He talked about how he felt like an insignificant ant.
  • LibrePlanet Day 2: Welcoming everyone to the world of free software
    One of the most important questions that free software is facing in the year 2019 is: how do we make the world of free software accessible to broader audiences? Vast numbers of people are using software every day -- how do we relate our message to something that is important to them, and then welcome them into our community? In order to achieve our mission, we need to invite people and get them to use, create, and proliferate ethical software, until it replaces until all technology is free. Many of the best talks at LibrePlanet 2019 echoed a message for the free software community to focus on building a culture that's respectful and encouraging for new people, respecting a wide variety of personalities and values. The first way to get people invested in the culture of free software is to make it fun, and that was the focus of the morning keynote, "Freedom is fun!", delivered by free software veteran Bdale Garbee. A prominent name in the free software world for decades, Bdale talked about how he has a habit of turning all of his hobbies into free software projects, starting with model rockets.

Python Programming: PyPy 7.1 and More

  • PyPy v7.1 released; now uses utf-8 internally for unicode strings
    The interpreters are based on much the same codebase, thus the double release. This release, coming fast on the heels of 7.0 in February, finally merges the internal refactoring of unicode representation as UTF-8. Removing the conversions from strings to unicode internally lead to a nice speed bump. We merged the utf-8 changes to the py3.5 branch (Python3.5.3) but will concentrate on 3.6 going forward. We also improved the ability to use the buffer protocol with ctype structures and arrays.
  • PyPy 7.1 As The Well Known Alternative Python Implementation
    Last month brought the release of PyPy 7.0 as the JIT-ed performance-optimized Python implementation. PyPy 7.0 brought alpha Python 3.6 support, an updated CFFI module, and other enhancements. Out now is PyPy 7.1 as its successor.
  • Python’s “else” clause for loops
  • EuroPython 2019: Presenting our conference logo for Basel
    The logo is inspired by graphical elements from the Basel Jean Tinguely Museum and Basel Rhine Swimming. It was again created by our designer Jessica Peña Moro from Simétriko, who had already helped us in previous years with the conference design.

15 Useful And Best Media Server Software For Linux

There is no doubt that Linux is multi-purpose operating systems. It has gone far from being the operating systems for system administrators or for the programmers. You can use it for many purpose. In this post, We will talk about some of the best Media server software for Linux so that you can turn your Linux to media server instantly. Read more

Video/Audio: Manjaro 18.0.4 KDE, Linux Action News, Linux Gaming News Punch and GNU World Order

  • Manjaro 18.0.4 KDE Through
    In this video, we look at Manjaro 18.0.4. Enjoy!
  • Linux Action News 98
    Is Linux gaming really being saved by Google's Stadia platform? We discuss the details and possibilities. Plus good news for KDE Connect users, Intel begins work on next-generation open source video drivers, and much more.
  • Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 5
    The Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 5 is here once again! Another week, another ton of news and so here's your bite-sized take at a few interesting topics for those struggling to keep up. As usual, it has a video to give your eyes as well as your ears a feast or just the plain audio to listen to on the go.
  • gnuWorldOrder_13x13