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Ubuntu

Ubuntu Core slims down, offers 10-year LTS support

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Ubuntu

Canonical released Ubuntu Core 18, based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, bringing 10-year support to the embedded Linux platform. Other enhancements include a reduced attack surface and easier porting of Ubuntu apps.

Canonical’s stripped-down, container-like Ubuntu Core version of Ubuntu for embedded IoT has reached version 18. The most significant benefit is that the distro is based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver). Although Bionic Beaver is almost two years old, its long-term support (LTS) status means Canonical promises to support it for 10 years, improving the chance of warding off malware attacks throughout the product lifespan.

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Also: Ubuntu Core 18 released for secure, reliable IoT devices

Ubuntu Core 18 Released By Canonical For IoT/Embedded With 10 Year Support Strategy

Canonical brings some bling to the Internet of Things with Snap-happy Ubuntu Core 18 release

Ubuntu: Ukuu, VAAPI, Multipass and More

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Kernel Update Utility (Ukuu) Moves To A Paid Licensing Model With The Latest Release

    Ukuu, or Ubuntu Kernel Update Utility, a fairly popular unofficial GUI tool for easily installing the latest mainline Linux kernel on Ubuntu-based distributions, has moved to a paid ($11) licensing model with its latest 19.01 release.

    Ukuu displays the list of kernels available in the Ubuntu Mainline kernel website, allowing users to easily download and install the desired version. The utility can also remove installed kernels, display the changes in the selected Linux version, display notifications when new kernels are available, and so on.

  • Ubuntu Gets Snappier Video Playback With Chromium Snap For VA-API Acceleration

    For Ubuntu users running the Chromium web browser and wanting to enjoy better video acceleration with Gallium3D or Intel hardware, there is now a Chromium Snap for testing that features VA-API video acceleration support for GPU-based decoding.

    Fedora Linux recently began offering Chromium patched with VA-API support due to Google not really trusting Linux GPU video acceleration and thus not having the support upstream. Fedora users testing out this VA-API video acceleration support with Chromium has been panning out well so now Ubuntu is taking the patch and offering a Chromium snap with this experimental functionality.

  • Ubuntu Testing Chromium Snap With VAAPI (Hardware-Accelerated Video Decoding) Support

    Ubuntu is testing a new Chromium snap package that enables VAAPI support, allowing the web browser to take advantage of hardware-accelerated video decoding.

    Canonical developer Olivier Tilloy has created a VAAPI-enabled Chromium snap using the Fedora patch (which got Chromium with VAAPI support about 2 weeks ago), and published it in a new candidate/vaapi channel. Thanks to this, Ubuntu and other Linux distributions that can enable Snap support, can easily install Chromium with Video Acceleration API enabled, which should bring smoother video playback, less CPU usage and improved power usage.

  • Multipass now also available for Windows

    Following our macOS release, this time the team is really happy to announce another platform Multipass will speed your workflow on. You can now grab the installer package for Windows from our GitHub Releases page.

  • Harness the Full Power of Ubuntu Linux on Windows with Multipass for Windows

    Canonical announced today the availability of its Multipass orchestration tool for virtual instances of Ubuntu Linux for the Microsoft Windows operating systems.
    Multipass is an open-source command-line utility that lets users orchestrate the creation, management, and maintenance of virtual machines of Ubuntu Linux for simplifying the development of applications. It is available on Linux and macOS operating systems, and, as of today, it's also available for the Windows platform.

    "Following our macOS release, this time the team is really happy to announce another platform Multipass will speed your workflow on, Windows" said Canonical's Michał Sawicz. "We’re looking forward to your feedback! The code that’s open-source is available on GitHub and that’s where you can submit bugs or feature requests as well."

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 562

Canonical Brings Ubuntu 18.04 LTS to IoT & Embedded Devices with Ubuntu Core 18

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu Core is a slimmed down version of the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system designed to be installed on all sort of embedded devices. It is engineered by Canonical to reduce security maintenance costs and software development risk due to the use of the company's revolutionary Snap universal package format.

With Ubuntu Core 18, Canonical makes another step towards its dream to build a highly secure IoT ecosystem, allowing customers to create secure and stable IoT solutions. Ubuntu Core 18 is based on the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system series, which means that it borrows all of its new features and improvements.

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Testing Ubuntu, Linux Mint Debian Edition, openSUSE Leap and more Linux distributions on my new laptop

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Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

In my previous post, I described loading five different Linux distributions onto my new Acer Aspire 5. In this post, I will add four more. But first I would like to add a bit more information about the laptop itself; I have been using it for a week, and I am quite pleased and impressed with it.

First, it is quite fast, it boots Tumbleweed in less than 30 seconds, for example. Battery life is good, too; the specifications say approximately seven hours, and in continuous real-life use I've gotten

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Introducing the Lubuntu Council

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Ubuntu

The Lubuntu community has grown exponentially since our switch to LXQt. With new users, contributors, and Lubuntu enthusiasts among many other people who have decided to join our community, we are finding the need to scale the project further than the unwritten technically-led oligarchy that we currently have in the Lubuntu project. Therefore, we are pleased to announce the Lubuntu Council.

Not much will change; the same people will be working to put together a high-quality Lubuntu release every six months. However, this ensures that Lubuntu’s processes stay structured and resilient for years to come.

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Best 10 Git GUI Clients for Ubuntu

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Development
Software
Ubuntu

I know most of the people reading this article are developers on Linux or Linux enthusiasts and don’t need any introduction to the Git. But for the noobs out there, Git is one of the most popular and most widely used version control systems available for software development and other similar kind of work. Basically Git is tool which can be managed and used through command line and it is one of the most easy to use command line version control tools available for Linux developers and users.With most of the developers nowadays using graphical tools for programming and development, there is no surprise they are also seeking for GUI tools which could prove to be efficient alternatives to Git command line tool. There are many Git GUI clients available for Linux and its distros like Ubuntu which offer most of the features of Git command line tool with more efficiency and reliability.

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How to Integrate Dropbox in Ubuntu Using Nautilus File Manager

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Ubuntu

This beginners guide will help you to install and integrate Dropbox in Ubuntu’s Nautilus file manager. Dropbox is a popular file hosting service provides users cloud storage and access to your files from any device. Dropbox provides free account upto a certain storage limit and also provides subscription based accounts.

Dropbox provides native desktop apps for Linux systems.

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SUSE releases enterprise Linux for all major ARM processors

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Linux
Ubuntu

SUSE has released its enterprise Linux distribution, SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES), for all major ARM server processors. It also announced the general availability of SUSE Manager Lifecycle.

SUSE is on par with the other major enterprise Linux distributions — Red Hat and Ubuntu — in the x86 space, but it has lagged in its ARM support. It’s not like SLES for ARM is only now coming to market for the first time, either. It has been available for several years, but on a limited basis.

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Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, December 2018

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • CasparCG Server for TV broadcast playout in Debian

    The layered video playout server created by Sveriges Television, CasparCG Server, entered Debian today. This completes many months of work to get the source ready to go into Debian. The first upload to the Debian NEW queue happened a month ago, but the work upstream to prepare it for Debian started more than two and a half month ago. So far the casparcg-server package is only available for amd64, but I hope this can be improved. The package is in contrib because it depend on the non-free fdk-aac library. The Debian package lack support for streaming web pages because Debian is missing CEF, Chromium Embedded Framework. CEF is wanted by several packages in Debian. But because the Chromium source is not available as a build dependency, it is not yet possible to upload CEF to Debian. I hope this will change in the future.

  • Participate in Fedora Test Day Today, Netrunner Announces Netrunner 19.01 Blackbird, Security Patch for GNOME Bluetooth Tools in Ubuntu 18.04, New Giant Board SBC from Groboard and Linspire Posts Development Roadmap for 2019-2020

    Canonical yesterday released a security patch for the GNOME Bluetooth tools to address a security vulnerability with Ubuntu 18.04. Softpedia News reports that security researcher Chris Marchesi discovered the vulnerability in the BlueZ Linux Bluetooth stack, "which made it incorrectly handle disabling Bluetooth visibility, allowing a remote attacker to possibly pair to Bluetooth devices." All Ubuntu 18.04 LTS users should update immediately to the gnome-bluetooth 3.28.0-2ubuntu0.1 and libgnome-bluetooth13 3.28.0-2ubuntu0.1 packages from the official repos. See the wiki for detailed instructions.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 561

Ubuntu’s Icon Theme Now Extends to Branded & Third-Party Apps

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Ubuntu

The single biggest issue I have with the Suru icon theme Ubuntu 18.10 debuted with was the lack of consistency.

Shipping an icon set with a uniform shape and glyph style is a bold move, but it’s one that only works when it extends to and covers every app icon on the system.

Alas, Suru did not. Third-party and branded apps were (understandably) left ‘untamed’.

The result? A punctured aesthetic:

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Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • Compact Bay Trail SBC has option for third GbE port
    Axiomtek’s “CAPA84E” is a 3.5-inch Bay Trail SBC with an optional third GbE port, dual M.2 slots, plus VGA, DisplayPort, USB 3.0, SATA, and -20 to 70°C support. Axiomtek’s motto may well be: “If first you succeed, iterate until you don’t.” The king of the spinoffs has released yet another iteration of one of the first Intel Bay Trail SBCs, the CAPA841, which in 2015 was followed by the slightly scaled down CAPA840. The new CAPA84R similarly supports Bay Trail and conforms to the 3.5-inch form factor, but with a different mix of features.
  • Letting people work where they want shows how much you value them
    Open organizations are inclusive. They aren't inclusive solely because it's the right way to be but because it produces better outcomes. Inclusivitiy enables a more diverse set of viewpoints.
  • Cities agree on minimal interoperability mechanisms

    Over a hundred European cities have agreed on ‘Minimal Interoperability Mechanisms’ defining the communication between software programmes and building blocks to allow co-creation and sharing of services. The MIMs, advocated by the Open & Agile Smart Cities (OASC) initiative, are “simple steps towards using new technology”, OACS chairman Martin Brynskov said on Thursday.

  • Containers On The Edge
    There are two major families for the choice of operating system and ecosystem: RTOS-based and Linux-based families. Smaller, cost-constrained devices tend to benefit from the simplicity of RTOS-based, while more full-featured and complex devices benefit from the richness of Linux (see The Shift to Linux Operating Systems for IoT for more background on the reasons for these approaches in IoT). Linux has been used in embedded devices for almost as long as it has existed (see here for an excellent timeline of early embedded Linux usage by Chris Simmons). The focus here is on Linux based products, as they have the needed functions such as access controls and memory segregation that allows for upgrading portions in a controlled fashion.
  • YouTuber Fits A Fully Functional Computer Into A Mouse
    While the YouTuber’s original plan was to squeeze a Raspberry Pi inside of a regular computer mouse but was unable to do so due to size constraints. Hence, he 3D printed a computer mouse to fit the components of the computer inside the mouse. Dubbed as “The Computer Mouse”, the device consists of a Raspberry Pi Zero W computer, a 1.5-inch color OLED LCD display with a resolution of 128 x 128 pixels, a 3D-printed mouse, a rechargeable 500 mAh battery, and a tiny Bluetooth retractable keyboard for text inputs and more complicated commands. It also has a power button at the edge to start the tiny computer. Further, it runs GNU/Linux-based operating systems such as Raspbian.
  • Microsoft Wallet for Windows Phone to be retired in February
    Support is set to end for all Windows 10 Mobile devices by the end of this year, and Microsoft is already beginning to retire apps in anticipation. In an update to the , Microsoft has noted that the app will be "officially retired" on February 28, 2019. Microsoft Wallet is the official tap-to-pay method for Windows Phones, similar to Apple Pay and Google Pay on iPhones and Android devices. The app also allows users to load up their loyalty and membership cards, allowing them all to be stored in one place.
  • mintCast 300.5 interview 5 Joe Ressington

Phoronix Test Suite Improvements

  • Making It Even Easier To Gauge Your System's Performance
    For those trying to understand their system's performance on a macro level will enjoy a new feature being introduced with Phoronix Test Suite 8.6-Spydeberg for seeing how your CPU/system/GPU/storage/network performance compares at scale to the massive data sets amassed by OpenBenchmarking.org and the Phoronix Test Suite over the past decade.
  • Phoronix Test Suite 8.6 Milestone 2 Released For Open-Source Benchmarking
    Two weeks since the initial Phoronix Test Suite 8.6 development release, the second milestone release is now available for your open-source, cross-platform benchmarking evaluation.

GNOME and KDE: GTK, KEXI, KookBook and Krita

  • Theme changes, revisited
    We’ve made a 3.24.4 release, to fix up a few oversights in 3.24.3. This release does not include the new theme yet, we will push that to the next release. We’ve also made another NewAdwaita tarball, which includes refinements based on some of the suggestions we received since last week.
  • KEXI 3.2 Beta
    Yesterday KEXI 3.2 Beta shipped, effect of improvements from entire 2018. Full info in the wiki. That's best KEXI to date! Pun intended because among other things one is especially worth mentioning, entirely new and final date/time grammar for user's SQL.
  • KookBook 0.2.1 – now actually kind of useful
    There was a snag in the KookBook 0.2.0 release, and 0.2.1 is available.
  • Krita Interview with Edgar Tadeo
    Comparing to Photoshop, I think Krita can make good digital painting that looks like it was made with a real brush. However,  PS is not a paint program, Krita’s advantage is its brushes.