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Canonical Outs New Major Kernel Update for All Supported Ubuntu Releases

Filed under
Ubuntu

Available for the Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine), Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series, the new Linux kernel security update is here to fix a vulnerability (CVE-2019-14615) affecting systems with Intel Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), which could allow a local attacker to expose sensitive information.

It also addresses a race condition (CVE-2019-18683) discovered in the Virtual Video Test Driver (VIVID), which could allow an attacker with write access to /dev/video0 to gain administrative privileges, as well as a flaw (CVE-2019-19241) in Linux kernel’s IO uring implementation that could also allow a local attacker to gain administrative privileges.

Another race condition (CVE-2019-19602) was fixed on x86 platforms, which could let a local attacker to cause a denial of service (memory corruption) or gain administrative privileges. Moreover, issues (CVE-2019-18786 and CVE-2019-19947) discovered in the Renesas Digital Radio Interface (DRIF) and Kvaser CAN/USB drivers could allow local attackers to expose sensitive information (kernel memory).

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MAAS 2.7 released

Filed under
Ubuntu

Following on from MAAS 2.6.2, we are happy to announce that MAAS 2.7 is now available. This release features some critical bug fixes, along with some exciting new features.

For some time, our users have been asking for the capability to deploy CentOS 8 images in MAAS. With the advent of MAAS 2.7, that is now possible. The Images page in the MAAS 2.8 UI offers the option to select and download CentOS 8. It is important to note that users of previous versions may see CentOS 8 as an available option, but cannot download or deploy it.

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Ubuntu: Installing Ubuntu for Raspberry Pi, Canonical's Web and Design, OpenStack Charms and Ceph

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Canonical Makes It Easier to Download Ubuntu for Raspberry Pi

    Canonical’s Design and Web team have recently updated the official Ubuntu website to make it easier for users to find the right Ubuntu image for their tiny Raspberry Pi computers.

    In December 2019, Canonical published a support roadmap for the latest Raspberry Pi 4 single-board computer on their Ubuntu Server operating system and pledged to fully support Ubuntu on all Raspberry Pi boards.

    With the release of Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS earlier this month, Canonical has also refreshed the Raspberry Pi page on the ubuntu.com website to help users find the right Ubuntu version for their Raspberry Pi boards.

  • Ubuntu Blog: Design and Web team summary – 14 February 2020

    The Web and Design team at Canonical looks after most of our main websites, the brand, our Vanilla CSS framework and several of our products with web front-ends. Here are some of the highlights of our completed work over our last two-week iteration.

  • OpenStack Charms 20.02 – CephFS backend for Manila and more

    The OpenStack Charms 20.02 release introduces support for Ceph File System (CephFS) to be used as storage backed for Manila. CephFS is a POSIX-compliant file system providing a file storage layer on top of Ceph. Manila is an OpenStack project providing shared filesystem services for tenants.

    Previous releases of OpenStack Charms included manila charm with a generic plugin that could be used to configure the NFS-based backend for Manila. Although this solution was suitable for testing and development, it was not intended for production environments.

    The CephFS backend for Manila brings the OpenStack shared filesystem service to the enterprise level. This comes through enabling tenants to benefit from all the best features provided by Ceph, such as high availability, fault tolerance, scalability and security.

    In order to deploy or extend Charmed OpenStack with CephFS backed for Manila, users have to use additional charms (ceph-fs, manila and manila-ganesha). These have been introduced and stabilised in this release. Please refer to the official documentation for information on how to integrate new charms with the existing deployment.

  • Canonical Releases OpenStack Charms 20.02 with CephFS Support, More

    OpenStack Charms 20.02 is available now with CephFS backend for Manila, Policy Overrides for more charms, updated OVN and MySQL 8 previews, and much more.

  • Ceph storage on Ubuntu: An overview

    Ceph is a compelling open-source alternative to proprietary software defined storage solutions from traditional vendors, with a vibrant community collaborating on the technology. Ubuntu was an early supporter of Ceph and its community. That support continues today as Canonical maintains premier member status and serves on the governing board of the Ceph Foundation.

    With many global enterprises and telco operators running Ceph on Ubuntu, organisations are able to combine block and object storage at scale while tapping into the economic and upstream benefits of open source.

    Why use Ceph?

    Ceph is unique because it makes data available in multiple ways: as a POSIX compliant filesystem through CephFS, as block storage volumes via the RBD driver and for object store, compatible with both S3 and Swift protocols, using the RADOS gateway.

    A common use case for Ceph is to provide block and object store to OpenStack clouds via Cinder and as a Swift replacement. Kubernetes has similarly adopted Ceph as a popular way for physical volumes (PV) as a Container Storage Interface (CSI) plugin.

    Even as a stand-alone, Ceph is a compelling open-source storage alternative to closed-source, proprietary solutions as it reduces OpEx costs organisations commonly accrue with storage from licensing, upgrades and potential vendor lock-in fees.

Debian and Ubuntu: SnowCamp 2020, Ben Armstrong 'Un-retires', Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • SnowCamp 2020

    This is just a late reminder that there are still some seats available for SnowCamp, taking place at the end of this week and during the whole weekend somewhere in the Italian mountains.

    I believe it will be a really nice opportunity to hack on Debian things and thus I'd hope that there won't be empty seats, though atm this is the case.

  • Ben Armstrong: Introducing Dronefly, a Discord bot for naturalists

    In the past few years, since first leaving Debian as a free software developer in 2016, I’ve taken up some new hobbies, or more accurately, renewed my interest in some old ones.

    During that hiatus, I also quietly un-retired from Debian, anticipating there would be some way to contribute to the project in these new areas of interest. That’s still an idea looking for the right opportunity to present itself, not to mention the available time to get involved again.

    With age comes an increasing clamor of complaints from your body when you have a sedentary job in front of a screen, and hobbies that rarely take you away from it. You can’t just plunk down in front of a screen and do computer stuff non-stop & just bounce back again at the start of each new day. So in the past several years, getting outside more started to improve my well-being and address those complaints. That revived an old interest in me: nature photography. That, in turn, landed me at iNaturalist, re-ignited my childhood love of learning about the natural world, & hooked me on a regular habit of making observations & uploading them to iNat ever since.

    Second, back in the late nineties, I wrote a little library loans renewal reminder project in Python. Python was a pleasure to work with, but that project never took off and soon was forgotten. Now once again, decades later, Python is a delight to be writing in, with its focus on writing readable code & backed by a strong culture of education.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 618

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 618 for the week of February 9 – 15, 2020.

Firefox 73 Is Now Available for All Supported Ubuntu Releases

Filed under
Moz/FF
Ubuntu

Released earlier this week, on February 11th, the Firefox 73 open-source web browser introduces various enhancement to make your browsing experience more enjoyable. Among these improvements, we can mention the ability to add a custom default zoom level that applies to all web content.

Firefox comes with a 100% zoom level by default, but now it can be changed to whatever suits your needs thanks to a new “Default zoom” dropdown menu implemented in the Zoom section under “Language and Appearance” settings.

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Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS released

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu team is pleased to announce the release of Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS
(Long-Term Support) for its Desktop, Server, and Cloud products, as well
as other flavours of Ubuntu with long-term support.

Like previous LTS series, 18.04.4 includes hardware enablement stacks
for use on newer hardware. This support is offered on all architectures
and is installed by default when using one of the desktop images.

Ubuntu Server defaults to installing the GA kernel; however you may
select the HWE kernel from the installer bootloader.

As usual, this point release includes many updates, and updated
installation media has been provided so that fewer updates will need to
be downloaded after installation. These include security updates and
corrections for other high-impact bugs, with a focus on maintaining
stability and compatibility with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

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Also: Download Now: Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS Released with Linux Kernel 5.3

Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS Released With The Newest Hardware Enablement Stack

Canonical Announces Amazon EC2 Hibernation Support for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

Already available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) installations, the Hibernation feature lets users pause their Amazon EC2 Instances. These can be later be resumed when needed and the previously saved workspace restored so users can continue from where it was left off.

Now Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) Amazon EC2 users can use the Hibernation feature, which is possible thanks to the latest linux-aws-hwe 4.15.0-1058-aws kernel package that landed recently in the distribution’s stable repositories.

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Direct: Amazon EC2 Hibernation for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS now available

Canonical/Ubuntu: Juju, Embedded World 2020 and More

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • DevOps tools in 2020: Why consider Juju?

    Many DevOps tools struggle as deployments change. Juju excels.

    2020 heralds a decade for a divided technology industry. Software delivery is diversifying. Complexity is increasing. Teams are looking to make use of new approaches such as serverless and split large applications into microservices. They also need to retain their existing applications.

  • Ubuntu at Embedded World 2020

    Embedded world 2020 is the trade fair for embedded systems technology. Given the rapid miniaturisation of hardware and the increasing scope of high performance computing, thousands of exhibitors use the show to take the stage and show off their work. This year Canonical is returning to discuss how to make embedded Linux, more developer friendly and more secure. Some of the highlights on the booth:

  • 10 hidden cloud gotchas to watch out for

    If there's a backdoor in Ubuntu 18.04, it will let in hackers whether it's installed on a cloud machine or a server in a closet down the hall. All computers are susceptible to power failures, hard disk crashes, alpha rays, malware and worse.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 617

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 617 for the week of February 2 – 8, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

Ubuntu-based elementary OS 5.1.2 Hera update fixes dangerous Linux sudo bug

Filed under
OS
Security
Ubuntu

A few days ago, we reported on an extremely serious sudo bug that impacted some Unix and Linux-based operating systems. While Ubuntu was not affected, two popular operating systems based on it -- Linux Mint and elementary OS -- were impacted, sadly. This was due to pwfeedback being enabled on those operating systems.

Thankfully, the folks over at elementary have already squashed the bug in the latest version -- 5.1.2 Hera. Even better, the sudo vulnerability fix is not the only improvement found in this version of the Linux distribution.

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Ubuntu Linux 18 Bionic Beaver

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

There's no need to fear GNU/Linux, so long as you don't mind troubleshooting more often than you would with macOS or Windows. Ubuntu simply requires more of a learning curve and effort than most people are willing to dedicate to their OS. I don't know many people who use Ubuntu or any other distro on a daily basis or even many willing to dual-boot the OS either. That said, people should reconsider these biases because Ubuntu is a highly usable and stable OS for daily computing, even if it will appeal mostly to coders, enterprises, and hobbyists. It's free too, though you should contribute to the project if you use Ubuntu regularly.

Ubuntu feels familiar and presents a user-friendly and customizable interface that mostly hides its messy underbelly. One drawback is that Ubuntu (and more broadly GNU/Linux) is incompatible with essential software, including Microsoft Office and Adobe CC, and it lacks broad first-party hardware support. Navigating Ubuntu also feels less fluid than macOS and Windows and troubleshooting errors can present some serious challenges. Editors' Choices Windows and macOS are more polished, feature better hardware and software integrations, and have larger user bases.

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Canonical Outs New Major Kernel Update for All Supported Ubuntu Releases

Available for the Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine), Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series, the new Linux kernel security update is here to fix a vulnerability (CVE-2019-14615) affecting systems with Intel Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), which could allow a local attacker to expose sensitive information. It also addresses a race condition (CVE-2019-18683) discovered in the Virtual Video Test Driver (VIVID), which could allow an attacker with write access to /dev/video0 to gain administrative privileges, as well as a flaw (CVE-2019-19241) in Linux kernel’s IO uring implementation that could also allow a local attacker to gain administrative privileges. Another race condition (CVE-2019-19602) was fixed on x86 platforms, which could let a local attacker to cause a denial of service (memory corruption) or gain administrative privileges. Moreover, issues (CVE-2019-18786 and CVE-2019-19947) discovered in the Renesas Digital Radio Interface (DRIF) and Kvaser CAN/USB drivers could allow local attackers to expose sensitive information (kernel memory). Read more

10 Best Linux Terminal Emulators [2020 Edition]

Do you prefer terminal emulators over GUI? But there are times when the terminal’s decent styling seems boring. In such cases, you look for more options to customize the terminal just like we do while choosing Linux distros. If that’s the case, your wait is over as we bring the list of best terminal emulators for Linux that you can use to refresh your monotonous daily work. Along with the styling, you can also turn the single terminal into a multigrid, observing the activity of each terminal simultaneously. Read more