Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ubuntu

Ubuntu maker wants app developers to stop worrying too much about security

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

Buoyed by the recent Snyk security report that found security vulnerabilities in several container images except Ubuntu’s, the company behind it, Canonical, has published a whole portfolio of hardened images.

Unsurprisingly, Canonical has partnered with Docker to streamline the delivery of the secure portfolio of images through Docker Hub.

“Canonical and Docker will partner together to ensure that hardened free and commercial Ubuntu images will be available to all developer software supply chains for multi-cloud app development,” Docker's Matt Carter wrote in a blog post announcing the collaboration.

Read more

Torsten Franz: My first month at the Ubuntu Community Council

Filed under
Ubuntu

In the last few weeks I have been asked by many people what topics we have in the Community Council and what we are doing. After a month in the Council, I want to give a first insight into what happened in the early days and what has been on my mind. Of course, these are all subjective impressions and I am not speaking here from the perspective of the Community Council, but from my own perspective.

In the beginning, of course, we had to deal with organisational issues. These include ensuring that everyone is included in the Community Council’s communication channels. There are two main channels that we use. On the one hand, we have a team channel on IRC on Freenode to exchange ideas. The channel has the advantage that you can ask the others small questions and have a relaxed chat. To reach everyone in the Council, we have set up the mailing list: community-council at lists.ubuntu.com

No, I haven’t yet managed to read through all the documents and threads that deal with the Community Council or how to make the community more active again. But I have already read a lot in the first month on the Community Hub and on mailing lists to get different impressions. I can only encourage everyone to get involved with constructive ideas and help us to improve the community of Ubuntu.

I haven’t worked on an international board since 2017 and had completely forgotten one topic that is more complex than national teams: the different timezones. But after a short time we managed to find a date where we all can basically do it and we had our public meeting of the council. This took place twice and the second time we all managed to attend. The minutes of the meetings are publicly available: 1st Meeting and 2nd Meeting. We have decided that we will hold the meeting twice a month.

Read more

Also: Design and Web team summary – 24th November 2020 | Ubuntu

Ubuntu Linux maker Canonical publishes curated container images to help secure software supply chains

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

A good deal of software development now relies on open source images, but it can be hard for businesses to know if they're introducing security flaws by using them.

Canonical -- the company behind Ubuntu Linux -- is addressing this by publishing the LTS (Long Term Support) Docker Image Portfolio, a curated set of secure container application images, on Docker Hub.

LTS Images are built on trusted infrastructure, in a secure environment, with guarantees of stable security updates. Canonical and Docker will collaborate on Docker Official Images and the LTS Docker Image Portfolio to bring the best of the two to the community and ecosystem. The entire LTS Docker Image Portfolio will also be exempted from per-user rate limits.

Read more

Reolink RLC-810A review – A 4K security camera with people & vehicle detection

Filed under
Android
Reviews
Ubuntu

The person and vehicle detection feature in Reolink RLC-810A security camera is just great, and I could not imagine reviewing other CCTV cameras or NVR systems without AI in the future, as in my experience, standard motion detection just does not cut it with too many false positive. As we’ve seen in the review, the way to position the camera may be important to make sure it works optimally, and at night, cats may be detected as persons, but it still removes 99% of the noise I got with PIR sensors.

I don’t like using Windows, simply because I only use Ubuntu 20.04 on my laptop and Android on my phone unless I have no other choice. So I also really appreciated the multiple ways I could access the camera from the Android app and a standard web browser in Ubuntu, and support for RTSP and ONVIF is also great for people wanting to integrate the camera into their own CCTV solution. It should be noted I could only access the “Clear” 4K UHD stream from the Android app (it should also work in Reolink Windows and Mac program), and RTSP, but only the “Fluent” 640×360 stream from the web browser and ONVIF, so that’s probably something the company will want to fix in a new firmware update.

Read more

Customize GNOME in Ubuntu 20.04 with this Productive Look

Filed under
Ubuntu

In one of the early guides, I explained the overall look and feel of the GNOME desktop. How you can visually change the look from a mundane desktop to something nice and better. This guide explains some steps which give you an idea of how you can Customize GNOME in Ubuntu 20.04 with a productive look.
Read more

Ubuntu Touch Installer Makes It Easier to Turn Your OnePlus 2 into a Linux Phone

Filed under
Ubuntu

Besides working on the Ubuntu Touch mobile OS, which was discontinued by Canonical a few years ago, UBports Foundation also works on other cool things to make it easier for users to migrate to a Linux phone from Android or iOS.

One of these is the UBports Installer or the official Ubuntu Touch Installer, which lets you install Ubuntu Touch on any of the supported devices without minimal effort. The best part is that you don’t even need Linux to use the Ubuntu Touch Installer since it works on macOS and Windows computers too.

Read more

Ubuntu Web Remix 20.04.1: First Stable Version Of Chrome OS Alternative

Filed under
OS
Web
Ubuntu

It’s been over four months since I reported about the arrival of yet another Ubuntu-based Linux distribution called Ubuntu Web Remix.

So, if you were also waiting for it just like me, the wait is over because its creator, Rudra Saraswat, has finally announced and made its first stable release, Ubuntu Web Remix 20.04.1, available to download.

To remind you, after Ubuntu Unity and UbuntuEd, Ubuntu Web is the third unofficial Ubuntu remix distros by the same developer Rudra Saraswat.

Unlike the other two, Ubuntu Web Remix aims to be a web-centric operating system and an alternative to Google’s Chrome OS or Chromium OS.

Read more

Regolith 1.5 Released with Support for Ubuntu 20.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

This is a new feature release of the i3-based desktop environment and includes key improvements and system optimisations aiming at simplifying workspace management and finessing the user experience.

If you’re not familiar with Regolith Linux all you need to know about it is that it takes the latest Ubuntu base and lays a keyboard-centric tiling window manager across the top. The result is a user-friendly, power-user desktop computing experience.

Regolith Linux is an Ubuntu-based Linux distro that ships with the Regolith desktop environment by default. The Regolith desktop environment is, however, available to install from a PPA — you can install Regolith alongside the regular GNOME Shell desktop.

Read more

Ubuntu Web Remix Wants to Be a Chrome OS Alternative, Beta Available Now

Filed under
Ubuntu

Meet Ubuntu Web Remix, an unofficial Ubuntu flavor created by Rudra Saraswat, the maker of Ubuntu Unity, based on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa) and designed as a free and open-source alternative to Google's Chrome OS operating system for Chromebook devices, as well as the open source Chromium OS project.

Being an alternative to Chrome OS/Chromium OS, Ubuntu Web Remix uses Mozilla's Firefox web browser rather than Google Chrome or Chromium. It offers support for Web apps, but you can also install regular Linux applications from Ubuntu's software repositories.

Read more

Kubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla review

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

On one hand, Kubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla is a solid distro. It has some really cool features - it's stylish, consistent, fast, stable, and sort of fun to use. Definitely ahead of the game when it comes to your typical Tux offering. But then, this release is a missed opportunity, because it could have nailed it with Plasma 5.20, which really is so much better than what you get by default. Honest.

And then, of course, there's the "pick your regression of the day" game. Any which issue with networking, sharing or media playback, all these are problems we've seen before, some have been addressed, some have gone back, and some have returned, and there's really no point for me to talk about this again. As long as the Linux desktop development remains focused on the concepts of amateur/project/fun instead of product, and as long as there isn't the tightest of integrations of all components, it doesn't seem feasible we will ever see a steady-state desktop that can maintain core functionality without erratic changes over consecutive releases.

Now that said, Kubuntu 20.10 is a bright ray of goodness and almost pro level of attention to detail and finesse in the Tux arena, and if you're on a hunt for a desktop, this seems like the most reasonable choice of late. There you go. Good but it could have easily been so much better.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

5 open source alternatives to GitHub

Git is a popular version-control system, primarily used for code but popular in other disciplines, too. It can run locally on your computer for personal use, it can run on a server for collaboration, and it can also run as a hosted service for widespread public participation. There are many hosted services out there, and one of the most popular brands is GitHub. GitHub is not open source. Pragmatically, this doesn't make much of a difference to most users. The vast majority of code put onto GitHub is, presumably, encouraged to be shared by everyone, so GitHub's primary function is a sort of public backup service. Should GitHub fold or drastically change its terms of service, recovering data would be relatively simple because it's expected that you have a local copy of the code you keep on GitHub. However, some organizations have come to rely on the non-Git parts of GitHub's service offerings, making migration away from GitHub difficult. That's an awkward place to be, so for many people and organizations, insurance against vendor lock-in is a worthwhile investment. Read more

5 Ways to Check Your Android Phone Hacked or Not

Do you suspect that your Android smartphone or tablet is infected with some malware or spyware? Well, there are several pointers that can indicate this is the case. For example, your device is unnecessarily slow and even freezes periodically, or displays popups. Experiencing these symptoms can mean that your device has been hacked but that is not always the case. Sometimes, devices act funny due to a handful of reasons including a security hack. In today’s article, we give you five tips on how to check whether your phone is infected with malicious software as well as how to ensure that it is safe/protected. Read more

Top Tips to Protect Your Linux System

Linux-based operating systems have a reputation for their high-security level. That's one of the reasons why the market share for Linux has been growing. The most commonly used operating systems such as Windows are often affected by targeted attacks in the form of ransomware infections, spyware, as well as worms, and malware. As a result, many personal, as well as enterprise users, are turning to Linux-based operating systems such as the Ubuntu-based Linux OS for security purposes. While Linux based systems are not targeted as frequently as other popular operating systems, they are not completely foolproof. There are plenty of risks and vulnerabilities for all types of Linux devices which put your privacy as well as your identity at risk. Read more

Kernel (Linux): Windows Assimilation, Wake-on-LAN, AMD and Intel

  • Tuxera First to Bring Network Bandwidth-Saving SMB Compression Feature to Linux Environments
  • Tuxera First to Bring Network Bandwidth-Saving SMB Compression Feature to Linux Environments

    Tuxera, a world-leader in quality-assured storage management and networking software, announced that the company's SMB server implementation, Fusion File Share by Tuxera, now offers transparent compression to platforms outside of Microsoft Windows. Compression is being rapidly and widely adopted in the storage industry as a feature in memory hardware, file system implementations, and also networking protocols such as Microsoft's server messaging block technology (SMB). The ability to compress files inline during transfer can significantly reduce bandwidth and transfer time. Microsoft released the transparent compression feature to their SMB protocol specification in early 2019. However, Tuxera is the first to implement SMB compression outside of Microsoft Windows, bringing this highly in-demand feature to Linux environments in enterprises around the world.

  • Wake-on-LAN

    With Wake-on-LAN (WoL) it can be slightly easier to manage machines in-house. You can fire up the workstation and start the day’s compile jobs (to catch up with overnight work by the KDE community, say) while drinking an espresso downstairs and doomscrolling. [...] If all the administrative bits are in place, then the simple way to wake up a machine is wake <hostname>. This requires root, since it sends specially-crafted (broadcast) Ethernet packets, which isn’t something that regular users can do.

  • AMD+SUSE Tackling Frequency Invariance For AMD EPYC 7002 CPUs - Phoronix

    Thanks to work by AMD and SUSE engineers, the Linux kernel could soon be seeing frequency invariance support for EPYC 7002 "Rome" processors for yielding greater performance and power efficiency. Over the past year we have seen a lot of Linux kernel work for dealing with frequency invariance but to now that on the x86 side has been focused on Intel Xeon processors. Now through the cooperation of AMD with patches led by SUSE, frequency invariance is being worked on for the EPYC 7002 "Rome" processors.

  • Intel Begins Landing Their Open-Source Vulkan Driver Ray-Tracing Support

    This week marked the release of Vulkan 1.2.162 with the ray-tracing extensions now finalized. As such Intel's stellar open-source team has begun landing their work around Vulkan ray-tracing ahead of the Xe HPG hardware availability that will support this functionality. Back in October I wrote about Intel preparing their open-source driver support for Vulkan ray-tracing ahead of Xe HPG and now with the updated Vulkan spec out there they are able to push more of their work.