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Ubuntu

Canonical and IBM Leftovers

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Red Hat
Server
Security
Ubuntu
  • What’s new in Security for Ubuntu 22.04 LTS?

    Canonical Ubuntu 22.04 LTS is the latest long term support release of Ubuntu, one of the world’s most popular Linux distributions. As a Long Term Support release, Ubuntu 22.04 LTS will be supported for 10 years, receiving both extended security updates and kernel livepatching via an Ubuntu Advantage subscription (which is free for personal use). This continues the benchmark of Ubuntu LTS releases serving as the most secure foundation on which to both develop and deploy Linux applications and services. In this blog post, we take a look at the various security features and enhancements that have gone into this new release since the Ubuntu 20.04 LTS release. For a more detailed examination of some of these features, be sure to check out the previous articles in this series which cover the improvements delivered across each interim release of Ubuntu in the past 2 years between 20.04 LTS and 22.04 LTS.

  • We Still Want IBM i On The Impending Power E1050

    In March last year, as Big Blue was finishing up the development of the Power10 family of Power Systems machines, we wrote an essay explaining that we wanted IBM i to be a first-class operating system citizen on the four-socket Power E1050 machine, which we finally expect to see launch on July 12 if the rumors are correct.

  • Big Blue Tweaks IBM i Pricing Ahead Of Subscription Model

    Back in May, Big Blue said that it was going to be simplifying the IBM i stack ahead of a move to subscription pricing for systems software as well as hardware that runs it. To do that means zeroing out prices for a slew of things that had price tags on them formerly.

  • Guru: The Finer Points of Exit Points

    Many years ago, we received a call from an IBM i customer stating that all exit points were gone and the QAUDJRN and receivers were missing. Then the question, “Do you think we’ve been hacked?” Truth was, the exit points weren’t gone; the associated programs had been de-registered. Conclusion, they had most likely been compromised.

  • IBM i Licensing, Part 3: Can The Hardware Bundle Be Cheaper Than A Smartphone?

    How many monthly iPhone bills is a Power10-based entry server worth?

  • Guild Mortgage Takes The 20-Year Option For Modernization

    When Kurt Reheiser returned to the IBM i server after a 15-year hiatus away the platform, things weren’t a lot different than how he left them.

Download Ubuntu 22.10 Kinetic Kudu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 22.10 (Kinetic Kudu) is now available on the download page as an alpha/beta release. In addition, there are other flavors, such as Kubuntu XFCE Netbook Edition, which features a KDE desktop environment instead of GNOME preinstalled on this version; however, if that’s not what suits your taste, then go ahead with the standard edition.

The download links below allow you to try out different flavors of Ubuntu. The desktop environment installed in each flavor varies, but all are up-to-date with the latest software from this distribution’s stable release schedule and daily sync process!

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A RISC-V laptop or mini PC with Rockchip RK3588-class performance may be coming soon

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat
Hardware
Debian
Ubuntu

The hardware and software specifications of the device will depend on the answers to the survey. First, it’s not sure we’ll get a RISC-V laptop since respondents will first be asked for the type of product, so we may end up with a fairly powerful RISC-V mini PC or/and SBC first instead.

You’ll also be asked for your use case, preferred Linux operating system (Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, others), desktop environment, as well as software packages you may need such as LibreOffice, Chromium or Firefox browsers, GIMP, Thunderbird, and so on. As a side note, they’ll select 5 winners from the respondents and send them on VisionFive RISC-V SBC with the results announced sometime in July on RVSpace community. If you don’t need to enter the draw, you do not need to leave your name and email to complete the survey.

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UBports OTA-23 is coming: Here's a list of models to test on

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Ubuntu

The UBPorts community is in the final stages of preparing its next release and it's calling for testers.

OTA-23 is getting close – the project's Github kanban looks quite good to us – and if you're lucky enough to have one of the project's supported devices lying around, then you can help.

Many of them are a few years old now, so there's a good chance that you've already replaced them and they sit unloved and neglected in a drawer. The starred entries in the list of devices are the best supported and should have no show-stopping problems. In order of seniority, that means: the LG-made Google Nexus 5 (2013); the original Oneplus One (2014); two models of Sony Xperia X, the F5121 and F5122 (2016); and Google's Pixel 3a and 3a XL (2019).

(The Reg FOSS desk suspects that if you have one of those lying around somewhere and aren't tempted, you can probably sell it to some open-sourcy enthusiast who would love to give it a go.)

Not starred but still high on the list are several devices which are listed as "functioning well." This means that they get green ticks across almost all of the feature-list apart from one or two items, such as lacking support for wireless external monitors. To us, this doesn't sound like a deal-breaker. These models include the Xiaomi Mi A2 (2018) and Poco X3 NFC (2020), and the Asus Zenfone Max Pro M1 (2018).

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Ubuntu Touch OTA-23 Is Coming on June 28th with FM Radio Expansion, Lomiri Fixes

Filed under
Linux
News
Ubuntu

Scheduled for release next week on June 28th, 2022, the Ubuntu Touch OTA-23 software update will still be based on the Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial Xerus) operating system series and promises FM Radio expansion on most BQ devices and the Poco X3 NFC smartphone, improved sound playback during device sleep, as well as wireless display support for Halium 9 and later devices.

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Linux Lite 6.0 Released, Based on Ubuntu 22.04 LTS

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Ubuntu

A new version of Linux Lite, a lightweight Linux distro based on Ubuntu, is available to download.

Linux Lite 6.0 uses the latest Ubuntu 22.04 LTS as its foundation, paired with Linux kernel 5.15, and the nimble Xfce 4.16 desktop environment. Although it runs fine on modern machines Linux Lite is tailored towards use on older and/or resource-limited hardware.

In this post I whizz through what’s new in Linux Lite 6.0, and point you in the direction of the official download so you can grab a copy, boot it up, and try it out for yourself.

Let’s dive in!

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Why Ubuntu Isn't a Flagship Linux Desktop Distribution Anymore

Filed under
Ubuntu

Although Ubuntu has been an enormous success, controversial decisions will prevent it from being named the best Linux desktop distribution in the future.

I’m aware that this article’s headlines are not among the most popular of the day. On the other side, the Internet is overflowing with articles like “Why Ubuntu is the best distribution for…,” which are not valid for one reason. In Linux, there is no such thing as “best.”

But before we go any further, it is essential to note that this post only covers the desktop editions of Ubuntu. The server side of things is an entirely different story that is outside the scope of this article.

So we will start with the following maxim – Ubuntu is a phenomenon. The distribution has risen from 0 to 100 at a rate that no other Linux distribution has ever matched.

Only a few years after its initial version 4.10, “Warty Warthog,” in 2004, Ubuntu rose to the top of the desktop Linux rankings.

In the years that followed, Ubuntu evolved to the point where, to the uninitiated, the terms Linux and Ubuntu meant the same thing. In other words, the distro became synonymous with Linux for a good reason.

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Debian and Ubuntu Miscellany

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu

LXC 5.0 Linux Containers Are Here as a Long Term Support Release

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

Switching to Meson, the new cgroup configuration options, and time namespace support are some of the new features in the LXC 5.0.

In recent years, using containers in Linux has revolutionized the whole software industry’s approach to how software is built. Nowadays, when it comes to containerized services, technologies like Docker and Podman have become the industry standard.

However, not everyone knows that the ability to run Linux containers using LXC has been supported as a core feature of Linux since 2008.

LXC (Linux Containers) was the first and most complete Linux container manager implementation. Moreover, it runs on a single Linux kernel and does not require any patches. In other words, LXC container support is native functionality built into the Linux kernel.

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Mediatek presents Genio 1200 based SoM compatible with ADLINK’s carrier board

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

MediaTek released a System on Module (SoM) that integrates their latest Genio 1200 AIoT (MT8395) System on Chip showcased last month. The LEC-MTK-I1200 features 8-cores (4x Cortex-A78/4x A55), 5-cores Arm Mali-G57 GPU and an APU system (5 TOPS). For quick prototyping, ADLINK has also designed a development board compatible with the LEC-MTK-I1200.

The LEC-MTK-I1200 comes in a SMARC 2.1 factor form and combines four Arm Cortex-A78 (up to 2.2GHz) and four Arm Cortex-A55  (up to 2.0GHz). The SoM can be configured to have four or eight GB of LPPDR4X and up to 256GB of UFS storage (32GB standard). 

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today's howtos

  • How to install go1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04 – NextGenTips

    In this tutorial, we are going to explore how to install go on Ubuntu 22.04 Golang is an open-source programming language that is easy to learn and use. It is built-in concurrency and has a robust standard library. It is reliable, builds fast, and efficient software that scales fast. Its concurrency mechanisms make it easy to write programs that get the most out of multicore and networked machines, while its novel-type systems enable flexible and modular program constructions. Go compiles quickly to machine code and has the convenience of garbage collection and the power of run-time reflection. In this guide, we are going to learn how to install golang 1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04. Go 1.19beta1 is not yet released. There is so much work in progress with all the documentation.

  • molecule test: failed to connect to bus in systemd container - openQA bites

    Ansible Molecule is a project to help you test your ansible roles. I’m using molecule for automatically testing the ansible roles of geekoops.

  • How To Install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9. For those of you who didn’t know, MongoDB is a high-performance, highly scalable document-oriented NoSQL database. Unlike in SQL databases where data is stored in rows and columns inside tables, in MongoDB, data is structured in JSON-like format inside records which are referred to as documents. The open-source attribute of MongoDB as a database software makes it an ideal candidate for almost any database-related project. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the MongoDB NoSQL database on AlmaLinux 9. You can follow the same instructions for CentOS and Rocky Linux.

  • An introduction (and how-to) to Plugin Loader for the Steam Deck. - Invidious
  • Self-host a Ghost Blog With Traefik

    Ghost is a very popular open-source content management system. Started as an alternative to WordPress and it went on to become an alternative to Substack by focusing on membership and newsletter. The creators of Ghost offer managed Pro hosting but it may not fit everyone's budget. Alternatively, you can self-host it on your own cloud servers. On Linux handbook, we already have a guide on deploying Ghost with Docker in a reverse proxy setup. Instead of Ngnix reverse proxy, you can also use another software called Traefik with Docker. It is a popular open-source cloud-native application proxy, API Gateway, Edge-router, and more. I use Traefik to secure my websites using an SSL certificate obtained from Let's Encrypt. Once deployed, Traefik can automatically manage your certificates and their renewals. In this tutorial, I'll share the necessary steps for deploying a Ghost blog with Docker and Traefik.

Red Hat Hires a Blind Software Engineer to Improve Accessibility on Linux Desktop

Accessibility on a Linux desktop is not one of the strongest points to highlight. However, GNOME, one of the best desktop environments, has managed to do better comparatively (I think). In a blog post by Christian Fredrik Schaller (Director for Desktop/Graphics, Red Hat), he mentions that they are making serious efforts to improve accessibility. Starting with Red Hat hiring Lukas Tyrychtr, who is a blind software engineer to lead the effort in improving Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and Fedora Workstation in terms of accessibility. Read more

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Android Leftovers