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Ubuntu

Microsoft Uses Canonical/Snap as a 'Ramp' Against Bash/UNIX/Linux

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu
  • PowerShell launches as a snap

    PowerShell Core from Microsoft is now available for Linux as a Snap. Built on the .NET Framework, PowerShell is an open source task-based command-line shell and scripting language with the goal of being the ubiquitous language for managing hybrid cloud assets. It is designed specifically for system administrators and power-users to rapidly automate the administration of multiple operating systems and the processes related to the applications that run on those operating systems.

  • PowerShell Core now available as a Snap package

    The goal of PowerShell Core is to be the ubiquitous language for managing your assets in the hybrid cloud. That’s why we’ve worked to make it available on many operating systems, architectures, and flavors of Linux, macOS, and Windows as possible.

  • Microsoft's PowerShell Available on Ubuntu as a Snap, Here's How to Install It

    Canonical and Microsoft announced today that PowerShell automation and configuration management system is now available as a Snap package for Ubuntu Linux and other Snap-enabled GNU/Linux distributions.

    Consisting of a cross-platform command-line shell and related scripting language, as well as a framework for dealing with cmdlets, Microsoft's PowerShell works on Windows, macOS, and Linux platforms to allow power-users and system administrators to have better and automated control over the administration of several operating systems.

  • Microsoft's PowerShell Now Available On Ubuntu In Snap Form

    Canonical and Microsoft have just announced that PowerShell Core is now available for Ubuntu users in Snap format.

    Back in the summer of 2016, Microsoft open-sourced PowerShell with plans to support Linux. PowerShell has been available on Linux for a while now without too much adoption while now it's available in Snap form for making it easy to deploy on Ubuntu and other Snap-supported platforms.

Canonical/Ubuntu: End of Ubuntu 17.10, Ubuntu Podcast, Snaps Add Flexibility with Tracks and Canonical Needs Help

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Ubuntu
  • PSA: Support for Ubuntu 17.10 Ends Today

    Ubuntu 17.10 reaches end of life on July 19, 2018 — which if you haven’t checked your calendar recently, is today. If you have thus far managed to resist the temptation to upgrade to a newer release then alas: today is the day when you need to start thinking about it.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E19 – Nineteen Minutes - Ubuntu Podcast

    It’s Season 11 Episode 19 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Ryan are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Snaps Add Flexibility with Tracks

    Snap packages have a rich set of features beyond getting the latest shiny on your Linux distribution. Tracks enable developers to publish multiple supported releases of their application under the same name. With this enabled, a user can switch tracks at any time to install and use an alternate supported relase of software.

    Within each track are four standard channels named edge, beta, candidate and stable. The channels represent the risk-level users should expect from the snaps within. Edge snaps (typically built from the latest code committed) would be riskier to use than beta releases, which are more risky than stable releases.

    By default every application has one ‘latest’ track and the four named channels. Developers can optionally choose whether to supplement that with additional tracks. Further the developer can choose which channels to use within those tracks.

  • Canonical Needs Your Help to Test the Improved Ubuntu 18.04.1 Server Installer

    Canonical's Dimitri John Ledkov put out a call for testing for the Ubuntu community to help them test drive the improved Ubuntu Server installer in the upcoming Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS point release.

    Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS, the first of a total of five scheduled point releases of the long-term supported Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system series is about to be released in approximately one week from the moment of writing, on July 26, 2018, with improved and up-to-date core components and apps.

  • Help Test the New Ubuntu Server Installer

    I only ask because Canonical’s server bods are currently looking for wily folks to help them test an improved version of the new Ubuntu Server installer.

Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) Reached End of Life, Upgrade to Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

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Ubuntu

Released nine months ago on October 19, 2017, Ubuntu 17.10 was dubbed "Artful Aardvark" by Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth because it was the first release of the Ubuntu Linux operating system to ship with the GNOME desktop environment instead of Unity on the Desktop edition.

To due to the sudden move from Unity to GNOME, Ubuntu 17.10 brought several substantial changes, such as the switch to the next-generation Wayland display server by default instead of X.Org Server, a decision that was reverted with the release of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), and the discontinuation of the Ubuntu GNOME flavor.

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Ubuntu: Server Installer, IoT Security, Snaps, Xubuntu

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Ubuntu
  • The improved 18.04.1 LTS Server Installer - Call for testing!

    With the release of 18.04 LTS Bionic Beaver the new server installer
    was introduced. At the time, it still lacked certain critical features
    which have now been implemented.

  • Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS Introducing Revised Server Installer, Adds Missing Features

    With the April release of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS on the server front was a brand new, in-house developed server installer created by Canonical to differentiate it from Debian's long-used text installer for the Ubuntu Server images. While it offered a fresh look and some new features, it shipped without many features common to Linux server installers. Fortunately, that is changing with the upcoming Ubuntu Server 18.04.1 release.

    As expected, Canonical is filling in the gaps with their new server installer dubbed Subiquity. With the upcoming Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS release they will be shipping a new version of this installer.

    This updated installer now supports LVM, RAID, VLAN, and bonds -- important features missing originally from Ubuntu Server 18.04.0. The functionality is now in place with the latest daily images although the text-based user-interface is still being refined.

  • IoT Security at Scale: Managing end-to-end security
  • Perfectly Formed Snaps Challenge

    Snaps are perfect for the smaller things in life too. Looking away from the graphical flagship apps, the snap store hosts lightweight server daemons, command line utilities, developer tools and even tiny games.

    Recently, a couple of petite snaps were published in the store. Sparky is a simple game played in a terminal, and a modest 32KB on disk. Bash-Shell-RPG is similarly diminutive at only 8KB. Neither contain an excess of additional libraries, just the absolute minimum needed to function everywhere.

  • What’s New in Xubuntu 18.04 LTS

    Xubuntu 18.04 LTS is the latest release of Xubuntu, it now available to download and install on your laptop and PC. This release features latest version of Xfce 4.12 as default desktop, include latest Xfce components.

    Xubuntu 18.04 LTS also comes with an updated Greybird GTK+ theme that includes a new dark style, better HiDPI support, greater consistency between GTK+ 2 and GTK+ 3 apps, GTK+ 3 styles for Google Chrome and Chromium web browsers, smaller switches, and improved scales. However, the GTK Theme Configuration tool was removed and it’s no longer possible to override colors in themes.

Lubuntu 18.10 May Support 32-Bit PCs If There's Demand, Here's How You Can Help

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Ubuntu

After it was decided earlier this year when the development of the next Lubuntu release, 18.10, kicked off that 32-bit installations will be dropped, Lubuntu developer Simon Quigley informs us that the team behind the lightweight GNU/Linux distribution wants to give 32-bit support one more chance if there's still demand from the community.

Starting with the upcoming Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) release, which is currently scheduled for an October 18, 2018, release, the official flavors won't be shipping with 32-bit installation images, except Lubuntu if users are interested in helping testing and 32-bit (i386) ISOs. Otherwise, Lubuntu 18.10 will not ship with 32-bit installation images.

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Also: Lubuntu Needs Help Testing For 32-bit x86 Support To Continue

Compact, rugged box computer runs Ubuntu on Jetson TX2

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Ubuntu

Axiomtek’s “eBOX560-900-FL” fanless AI computer runs Ubuntu 16.04 on Nvidia’s Jetson TX2 module, and adds 2x GbE ports and single USB, HDMI 2.0, mini-PCIe, and M.2 with optional NVM. The fanless system offers IP40 protection, vibration resistance, and -10 to 50°C support.

There have been a lot of carrier boards designed for Nvidia’s Jetson TX2 module, but the eBOX560-900-FL is the first complete Jetson TX2-based embedded computer we’ve covered. Axiomtek’s compact, rugged box computer, which follows earlier Ebox products such as the Intel Haswell based eBOX560-880-FL, is designed for AI computing, machine vision, deep learning, and edge computing.

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Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and 16.04 LTS Amazon Linux AMIs Now Support Amazon's SSM Agent

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Ubuntu

As of July 2018, Amazon's Linux AMIs (Amazon Machine Images) that are based on either the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) or Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating systems now come pre-installed with the AWS Systems Manager Agent (SSM Agent), an Amazon software designed to run on hybrid or Amazon EC2 instances in public and private clouds on AWS (Amazon Web Services).

"With this new feature release, AWS Systems Manager Agent is installed by default on all instances launched or built from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (2018.07 and later) and 18.04 LTS (all versions) AMIs," said Amazon. "By having the agent pre-installed, you can quickly start using AWS Systems Manager features such as Run Command, State Manager, Inventory and Patch Manager."

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Comparing Latencies and Power consumption with various CPU schedulers

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

The low-latency kernel offering with Ubuntu provides a kernel tuned for low-latency environments using low-latency kernel configuration options. The x86 kernels by default run with the Intel-Pstate CPU scheduler set to run with the powersave scaling governor biased towards power efficiency.

While power efficiency is fine for most use-cases, it can introduce latencies due to the fact that the CPU can be running at a low frequency to save power and also switching from a deep C state when idle to a higher C state when servicing an event can also increase on latencies.

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Ubuntu MATE - Pimp your desktop to perfection

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu MATE has made a quantum leap of innovation in the past several months, offering a wealth of visual and functional changes and a mindblowing level of flexibility when it comes to customization. You really have the ability to implement anything and everything, and all of it natively, from within the system's interface. The list of options is so long that it can be overwhelming.

Hopefully, this little pimping guide puts some order into this fine and rich chaos. Ubuntu Bionic isn't the most refined distro, but it sure has the almost infinite possibilities to make it appear and behave how you want it. You can have a classic desktop one day and then a MAC-like thing the next and then Ubuntu Unity the day after that. It's all there, very slick, very elegant. Well, it's time for you to do some exploring. See you.

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Lubuntu 18.04 Review: Stable and Dependable As Always

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Reviews
Ubuntu

I stated earlier that 18.04 looks pretty much the same compared to when I first installed it. This is not a bad thing. Lubuntu is not designed to be flashy or to have the latest cutting-edge features. It is designed to use few resources and run well on a wide variety of computers. It does that very well. You could set anyone who ever used Windows in front of a Lubuntu box and they would be good to go. I would certainly recommend it for beginners and older computers

One thing that was confusing when I was researching this article was the existence of more than one site for Lubuntu. When I searched for Lubuntu, one of the first search result entries was for lubuntu.net. I thought it was the project’s official website. Then, I was surfing through Lubuntu’s Wikipedia entry. It listed lubuntu.me as the official site. Both look very official. It’s only after you dig that you discover that lubuntu.net was created by “Free and Open Source contributors from Asia, Linux Fans and the Lubuntu Meilix community”. It’s essentially a fan site. They had better let people know that they are not the official site before they get in trouble with someone.

Have you ever used Lubuntu? What is your favorite Ubuntu flavor? Please let us know in the comments below.

If you found this article interesting, please take a minute to share it on social media.

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Linux Foundation, AGL and Linux Security

  • Deutsche Telekom joins Linux Foundation as platinum member
    Deutsche Telekom has joined The Linux Foundation Networking (LFN) as a Platinum member. Telekom will support LFN’s efforts to accelerate the development and adoption of open-source networking technologies and contribute to new network technologies enabling 5G services, said LFN. LFN said its projects now enable nearly 70 percent of all global mobile subscribers with the addition of Deutsche Telekom, and the company’s membership in LFN will drive the LFN initiative into new regions and promote the adoption of open standards and source.
  • Deutsche Telekom Goes Platinum at Linux Foundation
    Linux Foundation Networking (LFN) continues its membership growth with the addition of its newest Platinum member, Deutsche Telekom, one of the world’s leading integrated telecommunications companies. Deutsche Telekom joins LFN to support its efforts in accelerating the development and adoption of open source networking technologies. With the addition of Deutsche Telekom, LFN projects now enable nearly seventy percent of all global mobile subscribers. With its collaboration and extensive global footprint, Deutsche Telekom will help accelerate LFN globally, contributing to emerging network technologies critical to enabling 5G services. LFN supports the momentum of open source networking, integrating governance of participating projects in order to enhance operational excellence, simplify member engagement, and increase collaboration. Deutsche Telekom is also an active participant in the ONAP project and plans to contribute to the next platform release, Casablanca.
  • Automotive open source virtualization: Bringing open source virtualization in AGL
    The AGL Software Defined Car Architecture white paper defines how the AGL target platform for software defined vehicles can be implemented by using virtualization techniques, presented in the document along with their automotive benefits, challenges, use cases and requirements. From the beginning, this work objective was to provide an architecture for a virtualization platform that can be used, extended or customized by Tier-1 or OEM companies to reduce time to market.
  • Meltdown Protection For x86 32-bit Aligned For The Linux 4.19 Kernel
    Those still relying upon x86 32-bit Linux kernels for aging hardware and continuing to update to the latest software will find mitigation for the Meltdown CPU vulnerability with the upcoming Linux 4.19 kernel cycle. You'll find this mitigation but at the cost of performance. While x86_64 Linux was mitigated back in January for Meltdown, it's taken a while for x86 32-bit support for KPTI, Kernel Page Table Isolation. This is basically applying the same page table isolation approach seen on Linux x86_64 and ARM to now the 32-bit x86 kernel code. Obviously it hasn't been a priority with many Linux distributions not even bothering with i686 install images in recent years.

Cloud-Native/Kubernetes/Container/OpenShift

  • 10 Key Attributes of Cloud-Native Applications
    Cloud-native platforms, like Kubernetes, expose a flat network that is overlaid on existing networking topologies and primitives of cloud providers. Similarly, the native storage layer is often abstracted to expose logical volumes that are integrated with containers. Operators can allocate storage quotas and network policies that are accessed by developers and resource administrators. The infrastructure abstraction not only addresses the need for portability across cloud environments, but also lets developers take advantage of emerging patterns to build and deploy applications. Orchestration managers become the deployment target, irrespective of the underlying infrastructure that may be based on physical servers or virtual machines, private clouds or public clouds. Kubernetes is an ideal platform for running contemporary workloads designed as cloud-native applications. It’s become the de facto operating system for the cloud, in much the same way Linux is the operating system for the underlying machines. As long as developers follow best practices of designing and developing software as a set of microservices that comprise cloud-native applications, DevOps teams will be able to package and deploy them in Kubernetes. Here are the 10 key attributes of cloud-native applications that developers should keep in mind when designing cloud-native applications.
  • Google Embraces New Kubernetes Application Standard
    Once an organization has a Kubernetes container orchestration cluster running, the next challenge is to get applications running. Google is now aiming to make it easier for organizations to deploy Kubernetes applications, through the Google Cloud Platform Marketplace. The new marketplace offerings bring commercial Kubernetes-enabled applications that can be run in the Google cloud, or anywhere else an organization wants. All a user needs to do is visit the GCP marketplace and click the Purchase Plan button to get started. "Once they agree to the terms, they'll find instructions on how to deploy this application on the Kubernetes cluster of their choice, running in GCP or another cloud, or even on-prem," Anil DhawanProduct Manager, Google Cloud Platform, told ServerWatch. "The applications report metering information to Google for billing purposes so end users can get one single bill for their application usage, regardless of where it is deployed."
  • Challenges and Requirements for Container-Based Applications and Application Services
    Enterprises using container-based applications require a scalable, battle-tested, and robust services fabric to deploy business-critical workloads in production environments. Services such as traffic management (load balancing within a cluster and across clusters/regions), service discovery, monitoring/analytics, and security are a critical component of an application deployment framework. This blog post provides an overview of the challenges and requirements for such application services.

Software: Music Tagger MusicBrainz, Pulseaudio, COPR, AV1

  • Music Tagger MusicBrainz Picard 2.0 Ported To Python 3 And PyQt5, Brings Improved UI And More
    MusicBrainz Picard version 2.0 was released after more than 6 years since the previous major release (1.0). The new version was ported to Python 3 and PyQt5 and includes Retina and HiDPI support, improved UI and performance, as well as numerous bug fixes. [...] MusicBrainz Picard 2.0 was ported to Python 3 (requires at least version 3.5) and PyQt5 (>= 5.7). The release announcement mentions that a side effect of this is that "Picard should look better and in general feel more responsive". Also, many encoding-related bugs were fixed with the transition to Python 3, like the major issue of not supporting non-UTF8 filenames.
  • Pulseaudio: the more things change, the more they stay the same
    Such a classic Linux story. For a video I'll be showing during tonight's planetarium presentation (Sextants, Stars, and Satellites: Celestial Navigation Through the Ages, for anyone in the Los Alamos area), I wanted to get HDMI audio working from my laptop, running Debian Stretch. I'd done that once before on this laptop (HDMI Presentation Setup Part I and Part II) so I had some instructions to follow; but while aplay -l showed the HDMI audio device, aplay -D plughw:0,3 didn't play anything and alsamixer and alsamixergui only showed two devices, not the long list of devices I was used to seeing. Web searches related to Linux HDMI audio all pointed to pulseaudio, which I don't use, and I was having trouble finding anything for plain ALSA without pulse. In the old days, removing pulseaudio used to be the cure for practically every Linux audio problem. But I thought to myself, It's been a couple years since I actually tried pulse, and people have told me it's better now. And it would be a relief to have pulseaudio working so things like Firefox would Just Work. Maybe I should try installing it and see what happens.
  • 4 cool new projects to try in COPR for July 2018
    COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by Fedora infrastructure or signed by the project. However, it can be a neat way to try new or experimental software. Here’s a set of new and interesting projects in COPR.
  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: AV1
    Open source supporters and companies are teaming up to offer the next general of video delivery. The Alliance for Open Media (AOMEDIA) is made up of companies like Mozilla, Google, Cisco, Amazon and Netflix, and on a mission to create an open video format and new codec called AV1. In a blog post about the AOMedia Video, or AV1, video codec, Mozilla technical writer Judy DeMocker laid out the numbers; within the next few years, video is expected to account for over 80 percent of Internet traffic. And unbeknownst to many, all of that free, high-quality video content we’ve come to expect all across the Internet costs quite a bit for the people providing it via codec licensing fees. The most common, H.264, is used all over the place to provide the compression required to send video quickly and with quality intact.
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KDE and GNOME: Kubuntu 18.04 Reviewed, Akademy, Cutelyst and GUADEC

  • Kubuntu 18.04 Reviewed in Linux ( Pro ) Magazine
    Kubuntu Linux has been my preferred Linux distribution for more than 10 years. My attraction to the KDE desktop and associated application set, has drawn from Kubuntu user, to a tester, teacher, developer, community manager and councilor. I feel really privileged to be part of, what can only be described as, a remarkable example of the free software, and community development of an exceptional product. This latest release 18.04, effectively the April 2018 release, is a major milestone. It is the first LTS Long Term Support release of Kubuntu running the “Plasma 5” desktop. The improvements are so considerable, in both performance and modern user interface ( UI ) design, that I was really excited about wanting to tell the world about it.
  • Going to Akademy
    Happy to participate in a tradition I’ve admired from afar but never been able to do myself… until this year. My tickets are bought, my passport is issued, and I’m going to Akademy! Hope to see you all there!
  • System76's New Manufacturing Facility, Ubuntu 17.10 Reaches End of Life, Google Cloud Platform Marketplace, Stranded Deep Now Available for Linux and Cutelyst New Release
    Cutelyst, a C++ web framework based on Qt, has a new release. The update includes several bug fixes and some build issues with buildroot. See Dantti's Blog for all the details. Cutelyst is available on GitHub.
  • GUADEC 2018 Videos: Help Wanted
    At this year’s GUADEC in Almería we had a team of volunteers recording the talks in the second room. This was organized very last minute as initially the University were going to do this, but thanks to various efforts (thanks in particular to Adrien Plazas and Bin Li) we managed to record nearly all the talks. There were some issues with sound on both the Friday and Saturday, which Britt Yazel has done his best to overcome using science, and we are now ready to edit and upload the 19 talks that took place in the 2nd room. To bring you the videos from last year we had a team of 5 volunteers from the local team who spent our whole weekend in the Codethink offices. (Although none of us had much prior video editing experience so the morning of the first day was largely spent trying out different video editors to see which had the features we needed and could run without crashing too often… and the afternoon was mostly figuring out how transitions worked in Kdenlive).
  • GUADEC 2018
    This year I attended my second GUADEC in beautiful Almería, Spain. As with the last one I had the opportunity to meet many new people from the extended GNOME community which is always great and I can’t recommend it enough for anybody involved in the project. [...] Flatpak continues to have a lot of healthy discussions at these events. @matthiasclasen made a post summarizing the BoF so check that out for the discussions of the soon landing 1.0 release. So lets start with the Freedesktop 18.07 (date based versioning now!) runtime which is in a much better place than 1.6 and will be solving lots of problems such as multi-arch support and just long term maintainability. I was really pleased to see all of the investment in BuildStream and the runtime from CodeThink which is really needed in the long term.