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Ubuntu

Bodhi Linux 5.0 Enters Development Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, First Alpha Is Out

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Linux
Ubuntu

Now that Canonical released Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), more and more Ubuntu-based GNU/Linux distributions would want to upgrade to it for their next major releases, including Bodhi Linux with the upcoming 5.0 series. The first Alpha is here today to give us a glimpse of what to expect from the final release.

Besides being based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, the Bodhi Linux 5.0 operating system will be shipping with the forthcoming Moksha 0.3.0 desktop environment based on the Enlightenment window manager/desktop environment, and it's powered by the Linux 4.9 kernel series. Also, it supports 32-bit PAE and non-PAE systems.

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Plasma 5.12.5 bugfix update for Kubuntu 18.04 LTS – Testing help required

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KDE
Ubuntu

Are you using Kubuntu 18.04, our current LTS release?

We currently have the Plasma 5.12.5 LTS bugfix release available in our Updates PPA, but we would like to provide the important fixes and translations in this release to all users via updates in the main Ubuntu archive. This would also mean these updates would be provide by default with the 18.04.1 point release ISO expected in late July.

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Ubuntu 18.10 Aims to Improve Laptop Battery Life

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Ubuntu

It's been less than a month since Ubuntu 18.04 LTS released, but when you work on a six-month release cycle the focus moves quickly to what comes next. Canonical is doing just that by telling us what we can expect to see in Ubuntu 18.10, which arrives in October.

If you're only just getting used to Ubuntu 18.04, don't worry, Canonical hasn't forgotten about you. In a blog post, Canonical's desktop engineering manager, Will Cooke, details plans to release 18.04.1 in July. It will fix a number of bugs, but also introduce the ability to, among other things, unlock Ubuntu with your fingerprint.

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(K)Ubuntu: Playing' Tennis and Dropping 32-bit

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Ubuntu
  • Tennibot is a really cool Ubuntu Linux-powered tennis ball collecting robot

    Linux isn't just a hobby --  the kernel largely powers the web, for instance. Not only is Linux on many web servers, but it is also found on the most popular consumer operating system in the world -- Android. Why is this? Well, the open source kernel scales very well, making it ideal for many projects. True, Linux's share of the desktop is still minuscule, but sometimes slow and steady wins the race -- watch out, Windows!

    A good example of Linux's scalability is a new robot powered by Linux which was recently featured on the official Ubuntu Blog. Called "Tennibot," the Ubuntu-powered bot seeks out and collects tennis balls. Not only does it offer convenience, but it can save the buyer a lot of money too -- potentially thousands of dollars per year as this calculator shows. So yeah, a not world-changing product, but still very neat nonetheless. In fact, it highlights that Linux isn't just behind boring nerdy stuff, but fun things too.

  • Kubuntu Drops 32-bit Install Images

    If you were planning to grab a Kubuntu 18.10 32-bit download this October you will want to look away now.

    Kubuntu has confirmed plans to join the rest of the Ubuntu flavour family and drop 32-bit installer images going forward.

    This means there will be no 32-bit Kubuntu 18.10 disc image available to download later this year.

What’s New in Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS has been released and announced by Ubuntu MATE project. As part of official ubuntu flavor, this release features the latest MATE Desktop 1.20.1 as default desktop environment. Also introduces numerous improvements and new features, including better support for HiDPI displays, new desktop layouts, as well as support for indicators in all layouts by default.

Familiar is new default layout of desktop Ubuntu MATE 18.04. it based on the traditional layout with the menu-bar (Applications, Places, System) replaced by Brisk Menu. Use MATE tweak if you want try out the various desktop layouts.

Brisk Menu applications menu is now enabled by default in Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS, which ships with the Head-Up Display (HUD) feature of the Unity 7 desktop environmentand .MATE Tweak, which now lets you toggle the HiDPI mode more easily and a revamped Ubuntu MATE Welcome screen that now includes browser selection support and system telemetry if you want to help the Ubuntu MATE team improve future releases.

Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS also received several improvements. Among these, we can mention the Caja file manager, which can now encrypt your most precious files, advenced bulk rename, hash checking and advanced ACl properties. Marco window manager, which got hardware acceleration. MATE Dock Applet, which now features icon scrolling and matching

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Also: What To Do After Installing Kubuntu 18.04

Ubuntu 18.10 and Ubuntu in Microsoft Prison

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Ubuntu

Hands-On with First Lubuntu 18.10 Build Featuring the LXQt Desktop by Default

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Reviews
Ubuntu

The Lubuntu development team promised to finally switch from LXDE (Lightweight X11 Desktop Environment) to the more modern and actively maintained LXQt (Lightweight Qt Desktop Environment), and the switch is now official.

Lubuntu developer Simon Quigley approached us earlier today to inform that the latest Lubuntu 18.10 daily build is quite usable as he and his team did a lot of work in the past week to accommodate the LXQt desktop environment by default instead of the LXDE desktop environment.

The main difference between LXDE and LXQt is that the former is written with the GTK+ 2 technologies, which will eventually be phased out in favor of the more advanced GTK+ 3, and the latter is built using the Qt framework. However, it doesn't look like there are any plans for LXDE to move to GTK+ 3.

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Ubuntu: Tennibot, Desktop Plans for 18.10, Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo

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Ubuntu
  • Creating the world’s first robotic tennis ball collector with Ubuntu

    Why else did the Tennibot team turn to Ubuntu originally? “We needed something that was both light and compatible with libraries and existing software. Given the geographical spread of where the Tennibot would end up, our final choice needed to have remote upgrading capability too. And of course, both for ourselves plus our users who are not tech savvy, it needed to be solidly tested and stable” said Lincoln Wang, CTO at Tennibot.

    Haitham Eletrabi, CEO of Tennibot adds, “The compatibility with software like ROS and OpenCV makes the implementation and testing of Tennibot’s algorithms an easy task. The support from the Ubuntu community also simplifies debugging the device’s software. In addition, Ubuntu is so versatile with different sensors and components that it really makes it the more superior option for us.”

  • Desktop plans for 18.10

    Bionic is out the door and we’ve started the Cosmic cycle so I wanted to take this opportunity to tell you about our plans for this cycle, the sorts of features we want to work on and what you can expect from 18.10 when it arrives in October.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E11 – Station Eleven - Ubuntu Podcast

    This week we reconstruct a bathroom and join the wireless gaming revolution. We discuss the Steam Link app for Android and iOS, the accessible Microsoft Xbox controller, Linux applications coming to ChromeOS and round up the community news.

Kubuntu Devs to Focus More on Supporting ARM Laptops & Raspberry Pi Than 32-Bit

Filed under
KDE
Ubuntu

Earlier this month, the Kubuntu developers have confirmed to us that they won't support new 32-bit installations with the upcoming Kubuntu 18.10 release, and now they made it official.

Developer Valorie Zimmerman posted a message on the Kubuntu-devel mailing list a couple of days ago to officially announce that Kubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) is the last Kubuntu release to offer 32-bit ISO images, as starting with Kubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) they won't be supporting new 32-bit installations.

As already widely reported, the removal of the 32-bit install media revolution has begun amongst official Ubuntu flavors. The first to take the big step was Ubuntu MATE, followed closely by Ubuntu Budgie, Ubuntu Studio, and Ubuntu Kylin. After an official proposal from developer Bryan Quigley, Xubuntu and Kubuntu followed too.

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Ubuntu 18.10 Features: New Theme, Android Integration, Better Power Consumption

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Ubuntu

As you can imagine, Ubuntu 18.10 will come with a lot of new features and improvements, some of which Canonical planned for a long time but didn't manage to implement them in the recently released Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system due to its long-term support status and the focus on stability and reliability.

So, like any other 9-month supported release, Ubuntu 18.10 will be a testbed for Canonical to try new things. Some of these include the ability to unlock your Ubuntu desktop with a fingerprint reader, integration with the KDE Connect Android app by default through GS Connect, a new installer, and a new system theme.

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Also: Ubuntu 18.10 Aims To Lower Power Use, Default To New Desktop Theme

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Plasma 5.12.5 bugfix update for Kubuntu 18.04 LTS – Testing help required

Are you using Kubuntu 18.04, our current LTS release? We currently have the Plasma 5.12.5 LTS bugfix release available in our Updates PPA, but we would like to provide the important fixes and translations in this release to all users via updates in the main Ubuntu archive. This would also mean these updates would be provide by default with the 18.04.1 point release ISO expected in late July. Read more

New Arduino boards include first FPGA model

Arduino launched a “MKR Vidor 4000” board with a SAMA21 MCU and Cyclone 10 FPGA, as well as an “Uno WiFi Rev 2” with an ATmega4809 MCU. Both boards have a crypto chip and ESP32-based WiFi module. In conjunction with this weekend’s Maker Faire Bay Area, Arduino launched two Arduino boards that are due to ship at the end of June. The MKR Vidor 4000 is the first Arduino board equipped with an field programmable . The Intel Cyclone 10 FPGA. will be supported with programming libraries and a new visual editor. The Arduino Uno WiFi Rev 2, meanwhile, revises the Arduino Uno WiFi with a new Microchip ATmega4809 MCU. It also advances to an ESP32-based u-blox NINA-W102 WiFi module, which is also found on the Vidor 4000. Read more

DragonFlyBSD 5.3 Works Towards Performance Improvements

Given that DragonFlyBSD recently landed some SMP performance improvements and other performance optimizations in its kernel for 5.3-DEVELOPMENT but as well finished tidying up its Spectre mitigation, this weekend I spent some time running some benchmarks on DragonFlyBSD 5.2 and 5.3-DEVELOPMENT to see how the performance has shifted for an Intel Xeon system. Read more

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