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Ubuntu

Ubuntu: Desktop Software Users' Feedback, Ubuntu Server Development

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Ubuntu

Canonical Wants You to Vote for the Default Apps of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

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Ubuntu

Following on a discussion with the HackerNews community on the things that users want to see in the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, Canonical's Dustin Kirkland is now asking the Ubuntu community to vote for the default apps of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

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Canonical Outs New Kernel Security Updates for All Supported Ubuntu Releases

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Ubuntu

On July 20, 2017, Canonical released new kernel updates for all supported Ubuntu Linux releases, including Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, Ubuntu 16.10, and Ubuntu 17.04, fixing up to fifteen security vulnerabilities.

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Also: Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Users Can Now Install the Linux 4.10 Kernel from Ubuntu 17.04

Debian and Ubuntu: /etc/motd, HackerNews, Default Apps For 18.04 LTS, EoL, and Ubunsys

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Fear and Loathing in Debian^H^H^H^H^H^H/Ubuntu (or: who needs /etc/motd)

    You know what’s even better then making something overcomplicated? Changing decades of expected behavior and not providing a way to, say, opt out. I don’t want to run a fuckload of stupid shell scripts every time I login that do super informative tasks like telling me the IP address assigned to my loopback device. I also don’t want to be told that I should use Landscape, or that there are 83 processes running on my machine.

  • ThankHN: A Thank-You Note to the HackerNews Community, from Ubuntu

    A huge THANK YOU to the entire HackerNews community, from the Ubuntu community!  Holy smokes...wow...you are an amazing bunch!  Your feedback in the thread, "Ask HN: What do you want to see in Ubuntu 17.10?" is almost unbelievable!

    We're truly humbled by your response.

    I penned this thread, somewhat on a whim, from the Terminal 2 lounge at London Heathrow last Friday morning before flying home to Austin, Texas.  I clicked "submit", closed my laptop, and boarded an 11-hour flight, wondering if I'd be apologizing to my boss and colleagues later in the day, for such a cowboy approach to Product Management...

  • Ubuntu Is Trying To Figure Out The Default Apps For 18.04 LTS

    Canonical is running a survey in trying to figure out what should be the default applications for next year's Ubuntu 18.04 LTS release.

  • Ubuntu 16.10 reaches end of life

    Nine months after its release, the "Yakkety Yak" Ubuntu release, also carrying the version number 16.10, reaches its last day of support. Those still using it should upgrade to Ubuntu 17.04.

  • Ubunsys An Advanced System Utility for Ubuntu (Dangerous As Well)

    Ubunsys gives you power to access some dangerous features of your Ubuntu system. It is an advanced system utility application designed for Ubuntu to manage you system with just mouse clicks. It can be help with package list, able to do changes on system configuration, updates, execute improves, fixes, executing actions to blow of mouse click.

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Ubuntu 17.10: Back to a GNOME Future

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GNOME
Ubuntu

It would have been impossible to avoid hearing that Canonical has decided to shift their flagship product away from their in-house Unity desktop back to an old friend: GNOME. You may remember that desktop — the one that so many abandoned after the shift from 2.x to 3.x.

A few years later, GNOME 3 is now one of the most rock-solid desktops to be found, and one of the most user-friendly Linux desktop distributions is heading back to that particular future. As much as I enjoyed Unity, this was the right move for Canonical. GNOME is a mature desktop interface that is as reliable as it is user-friendly.

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Ubuntu: Ubuntu 16.10 EoL, Snaps, Juju, Ubuntu Podcast, Ubuntu Fridge, and ROS

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) End of Life reached on July 20 2017
  • Ubuntu 16.10 reaches end of life

    If you are still running Ubuntu 16.10, which was released last October, it’s time to upgrade. Also known as 'Yakkety Yak', it was released on October 13, 2016, and as per short-term release lifespans, has petered out its nine-month support cycle. If you’re still running 16.10, then it’s time to upgrade to Ubuntu 17.04 which will be supported until the start of 2018.

  • Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) Is No Longer Supported, Upgrade to Ubuntu 17.04 Now

    Today, July 20, 2017, is the last day when the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) was supported by Canonical as the operating system now reached end of life, and it will no longer receive security and software updates.

    Dubbed by Canonical and Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth as the Yakkety Yak, Ubuntu 16.10 was launched on October 13, 2016, and it was a short-lived release that only received nine (9) months of support through kernel updates, bug fixes, and security patches for various components.

  • Clarification: Snappy and Flatpak

    Recently, I posted a piece about distributions consolidating around a consistent app store. In it I mentioned Flatpak as a potential component and some people wondered why I didn’t recommend Snappy, particularly due to my Canonical heritage.

    To be clear (and to clear up my in-articulation): I am a fan of both Snappy and Flatpak: they are both important technologies solving important problems and they are both driven by great teams. To be frank, my main interest and focus in my post was the notion of a consolidated app store platform as opposed to what the specific individual components would be (other people can make a better judgement call on that). Thus, please don’t read my single-line mention of Flatpak as any criticism of Snappy. I realize that this may have been misconstrued as me suggesting that Snappy is somehow not up to the job, which was absolutely not my intent.

  • Testing the future of Juju with snaps

    Juju 2.3 is under heavy development, and one thing we all want when we're working on the next big release of our software product is to get feedback from users. Are you solving the problems your user has? Are there bugs in the corner cases that a user can find before the release? Are the performance improvements you made working for everyone like you expect? The more folks that test the software before it's out, the better off your software will be!

  • S10E20 – Wry Mindless Ice

    It’s Season Ten Episode Twenty of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 513
  • Robot development made easy with Husarion CORE2-ROS & Ubuntu – part 2

Support for Ubuntu 16.10 Ends Today

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Ubuntu

Yup, Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak hit end of life (EOL) on July 20.

Released on October 13, 2016, Ubuntu 16.10 is a short-term release with a 9-month support cycle.

That support period is at an end and Ubuntu 16.10 will reach end of life on Thursday, July 20, 2017.

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Netrunner Rolling and Ubuntu Upgrades

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu
  • Netrunner Rolling Is Back After One and a Half Years, It's Based on Arch Linux

    After one and a half years of silence, the Netrunner Rolling series make a comeback today with the release of version 2017.07, based on Arch Linux and Manjaro operating systems.

    By our count, Netrunner Rolling 2017.07 is here sixteen months after the Netrunner Rolling 2016.01 release, which was unveiled on February 27, 2016, and it's an up-to-date version with all the latest GNU/Linux technologies. The good news is that it's here to stay, and will receive regular updates 3 or 4 for times a year.

  • Clarification and changes to release upgrades

    I’ve recently made some changes to how do-release-upgrade, called by update-manager when you choose to upgrade releases, behaves and thought it’d be a good time to clarify how things work and the changes made.

    When do-release-upgrade is called it reads a meta-release file from changelogs.ubuntu.com to determine what releases are supported and to which release to upgrade. The exact meta-release file changes depending on what arguments, –proposed or –devel-release, are passed to do-release-upgrade. The meta-release file is used to determine which tarball to download and use to actually perform the upgrade. So if you are upgrading from Ubuntu 17.04 to Artful then you are actually using the the ubuntu-release-upgrader code from Artful.

Ubuntu: Ubuntu Upgrades, LXC/LXD, End of Support for Ubuntu 16.10, and More

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Ubuntu
  • “Don’t run this on any system you expect to be up” they said, but we did it anyway

    This is the story of how we upgraded over 2000 Ubuntu production servers – turning over millions an hour – by installing the operating system in memory, wiping the root disk and reinstalling the OS back on disk from RAM. We did it, there was zero data loss and it saved us lots of time and money in support. It also took months of careful planning and many many tests.

  • Condensing Your Infrastructure with System Containers

    When most people hear the word containers, they probably think of Docker containers, which are application containers. But, there are other kinds of containers, for example, system containers like LXC/LXD. Stéphane Graber, technical lead for LXD at Canonical Ltd., will be delivering two talks at the upcoming Open Source Summit NA in September: “GPU, USB, NICs and Other Physical Devices in Your Containers” and “Condensing Your Infrastructure Using System Containers” discussing containers in detail.  

    In this OS Summit preview, we talked with Graber to understand the difference between system and application containers as well as how to work with physical devices in containers.

  • Support for Ubuntu 16.10 Ends Tomorrow

    It’s almost time to bid bon-voyage to one of the most boring exciting releases of Ubuntu there’s ever been. Yup, Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak hits end of life (EOL) tomorrow, July 20. Released on October 13, 2016, Ubuntu 16.10 is a short-term releases with a 9-month support cycle.

  • Ubuntu Artful Desktop July Shakedown – call for testing

    We’re mid-way through the Ubuntu Artful development cycle, with the 17.10 release rapidly approaching on the horizon.

  • Atom Text Editor Can Now Be Installed Using Snapd in Ubuntu

    Atom is an open-source and free text/source code editor for Linux, Mac and Windows developed by GitHub, written in Node.js and embedded Git control. Atom is based on Electron and built using web technologies (HTML, JavaScript, CSS, and Node.js integration.). It is known as hackable text editor because it can be deeply customized and its functionality can be extended using packages built and maintained by community. It can also be used as an integrated development environment (IDE).

  • WeChat Is Now Available As Snap For Ubuntu 16.04+

    WeChat is a free messaging service, it's initial release was back in 2011 and by 2017 it was one of the largest standalone messaging service by monthly active users. It has applications for all platforms Windows, Mac, Android, iOS, and Linux. The Linux version of the application is based on electron and available as snap package for Ubuntu versions. This desktop version allows you to chat and share files just like you can on the mobile versions.

Ubuntu 17.10 May Make It Easier to Connect to Free Wifi and Improved GUI

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GNOME
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 17.10 May Make It Easier to Connect to Free Wifi

    Connecting to free wifi hotspots might be easier Ubuntu 17.10 — something I personally will appreciate!

    I work out of a coffee shop¹ during the week and their free wifi, while not perfect, is decent enough to feed this hungry blog on.

    But Ubuntu has issues trying to connect to the wifi because it uses a captive portal for authentication.

  • GNOME Devs Debut Improved Wi-Fi Settings Panel

    Improved wifi settings are coming as part a redesigned GNOME Control Center. And as you can see in this video, the new wifi panel is looking seriously good.

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KDE: Krita 3.2.0 Beta 2, Akademy 2017

  • Krita 3.2.0: Second Beta Available
    We’re releasing the second beta for Krita 3.2.0 today! These beta builds contain the following fixes, compared to the first 3.2.0 beta release. Keep in mind that this is a beta: you’re supposed to help the development team out by testing it, and reporting issues on bugs.kde.org.
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  • KDE Arrives in Almería for Akademy 2017
    We have travelled from across the globe to meet for our annual gathering where we plan and discuss the next year's activities creating free software to share with the world. Almería is in the south east of Spain, a country which has long been a supporter of free software and collaboration with its creators. The sun here is hot but the water is also warm for those who make it to the beach to discuss their work with a pina colada and a swim. Over the last year KDE has run conferences in Brazil, India, Spain, Germany and sprints in Randa in Switzerland, Krita in the Netherlands, Marble in Germany, GSoC in the US, WikiToLearn in India, Plasma in Germany, Kontact in France, and sent representatives to OSCAL in Albania, FOSSASIA in Singapore, FUDCON in Cambodia, HKOSCon in Hong Kong and more.
  • Guest Post: Retired From KDE, by Paul Adams
    Long time no see, huh? Yes, I neglected my blog and as such didn't post anything since Akademy 2014... Interestingly this is the last one where my dear Paul Adams held a famous talk.  [...] During my PhD I was studying Free Software community productivity metrics. I was also working on research into software quality funded by the European Commission. KDE eV (the governance body1 for KDE) was also taking part in that project. At this time KDE was almost ready to release KDE 4. It was an exciting time to get involved.

Software and howtos

Ubuntu: Desktop Software Users' Feedback, Ubuntu Server Development

Games: Day of Infamy, Gravitation, and Patches From Samuel Pitoiset for Valve