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Ubuntu

Fedora vs Ubuntu – Differences and Similarities

Filed under
Red Hat
Ubuntu

Two of the most popular (yet different) Linux distros are Fedora and Ubuntu. There are quite a lot of differences and similarities between the two. For beginners, they may seem the same or very similar, but read our comparison and you’ll learn more about Fedora and Ubuntu and how they correlate to each other.

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Also: Ubuntu Server development summary – 16 April 2019

4 of the Best Screen Recorders for Ubuntu

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

There are plenty of reasons you might need to record your screen. Maybe you’re a developer looking to demonstrate an app you built. Perhaps you’re looking to do an instructional screencast. You might just want to show a family member how to do something.

You have plenty of choices when it comes to which screen recorder to use on Ubuntu. Some are simple to use, while others are more complicated but have additional features. It also depends on whether you prefer a GUI or the command line.

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Also: qt-fsarchiver

Ubuntu 19.04 comes refreshed with the Linux 5.0 kernel

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

The heart of the Linux desktop beats on with the latest release of Canonical's Ubuntu distribution: Ubuntu 19.04. But, in addition, the server version comes ready with the latest cloud and container tools.

Now, if you're using Ubuntu in production, you probably should stick with the Long Term Support Ubuntu 18.04. After all, it comes with ten years of support. But there's a lot of tempting goodness in Disco Dingo, Ubuntu 19.04's playful moniker.

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ZFS Indications Have Us Already Eager For Ubuntu 19.10

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Ubuntu

While Ubuntu 19.04 isn't even coming out until tomorrow, the indications around Ubuntu desktop ZFS support and functionality likely debuting the next cycle has us already quite eager for the Ubuntu 19.10 release coming out in October.

We've been anxiously clamoring for more details on the Ubuntu desktop ZFS plans as part of their new desktop installer initiative and much more than simply offering ZFS On Linux (ZoL) that they've been doing through their archive in recent years. In order to get this support ready before next year's Ubuntu 20.04 Long Term Support release, they need to have the initial work ready for Ubuntu 19.10 to ensure sufficient testing pre-LTS cycle.

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Also: How to Upgrade to Ubuntu 19.04 from 18.10, Right Now

One Year Leading Ubuntu Studio

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Ubuntu

I hardly know how to describe this entire past year. If I had one word to describe it, that would be “surreal.”
Just a little over a year ago, I answered a call to put together a council for Ubuntu Studio. The project leader at the time couldn’t commit the time to lead, and the project was failing. As someone who was using open source software for audio production at the time, and at the time using Fedora Jam, I saw Ubuntu Studio as too important of a project to let die. I just had no idea how dire the situation was, or how it had even ended up that way.
With the release of 18.04 LTS Beta around the corner, I knew something had to be done, and fast. So, I jumped-in, feet first.
Ubuntu Studio, as it turns out, was on life support. It hadn’t been worked on, save a few bugfixes here and there, for two years. Many considered it a dead project, but somehow, the plug never got pulled. I was determined to save it.
I had many connections and sought a lot of advice. We got the council going, and since I was running the meetings, I became the chair. Then, I acted as the release manager. However, I wasn’t quite comfortable with signing-off on a release that would be supported for three years. I was advised by those already involved with the Ubuntu release team that it might be a good idea to have Ubuntu Studio 18.04 be a non-LTS. I presented this idea to the council, and they agreed.
Ubuntu Studio 18.04 “Bionic Beaver” was released as a non-LTS. The community was unhappy with this decision since now that meant those that only use LTS, especially in professional applications, were feeling left out. Eventually we figured out a solution, but not until much later, and that became the Ubuntu Studio Backports PPA.

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Snap, Ubuntu and Derivatives

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Cloud images, qemu, cloud-init and snapd spread tests

    I found myself wanting an official Debian unstable cloud image so I could use it in spread while testing snapd. I learned it is easy enough to create the images yourself but then I found that Debian started providing raw and qcow2 cloud images for use in OpenStack and so I started exploring how to use them and generalize how to use arbitrary cloud images.

  • Industrial & Embedded Linux: Looking Ahead

    I recently returned from an extended visit to Germany, where my colleagues and I kept busy attending conferences, visiting customers and partners. We travelled around the country, talking to many, many people at dozens of companies about embedded Linux. We confirmed existing trend data, and gained exciting new insights! Now that I’m back, I’ll summarize key takeaways here.

    We started off at Hannover Messe, the mother of all trade shows. Billed as ‘The world’s leading trade show for industrial technology,’ the attendees occupy every hotel, hostel and spare bedroom within 100 km of Hannover for the week. The booths themselves are massive; something to behold. I suspect the quickest path through all the halls would take hours of walking. We only scratched the surface, it was a tremendous experience!

    [...]

    Each time we explained the benefits of Ubuntu; our pedigree in the cloud, and the services we offer, including support, long-term maintenance and hardware certification. There was often a sense of strong alignment with the needs & wants being described to us, which was both gratifying and exciting! Lastly, some of the more forward-thinking companies were already planning for their futures managing containers and packages, they were pretty excited to hear about snapcraft.io. 

  • 2 Ways to Upgrade Ubuntu 18.04/18.10 To Ubuntu 19.04 (GUI & Terminal)

    Ubuntu 19.04, codenamed Disco Dingo, will be released on April 18, 2019. This tutorial is going to you 2 ways to upgrade Ubuntu 18.04 and Ubuntu 18.10 to 19.04. The first method uses the graphical update manger and the second method uses command line. Usually you use the graphical update manager to upgrade Ubuntu desktop and use command line to upgrade Ubuntu server, but the command-line method works for desktops too.

  • Upgrade Ubuntu 18.04 to Ubuntu 19.04 Directly From Command Line

    In the last article, I explained how to upgrade Ubuntu 18.04 and Ubuntu 18.10 to Ubuntu 19.04. However, because Ubuntu 18.10 is stilled supported by the Canonical company, Ubuntu 18.04 users need to upgrade to 18.10 first and follow the same process to upgrade to 19.04. This tutorial will be showing you how to upgrade Ubuntu 18.04 directly to Ubuntu 19.04 from command line, bypassing Ubuntu 18.10.

  • Linux Mint Founder Calls for Better Developer Support

    Linux Mint is among the most popular and seemingly most easy to use Linux distributions. The Ubuntu-based distribution has built its loyal user base and has been growing ever since. However, the founder of Linux Mint seems to be burning out.

    In the latest blog post, Linux Mint founder Clement ‘Clem’ Lefebvre wrote that he didn’t enjoy the latest development cycle as two of the most talented developers have been away. The project couldn’t make the performance improvements it expected.

    “Boosting performance in the Muffin window manager hasn’t been, and still isn’t, straight forward,” he wrote.

Ubuntu 19.04 Delivers A Welcome Surprise For Nvidia GPU Owners

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 19.04 is a only few days away, and it's looking like the forthcoming Ubuntu Linux Gaming Report may get a slightly higher score than expected. That's because the "out-of-box" graphics driver situation for Nvidia GPU owners is getting a very welcome update.

On the Ubuntu MATE blog, Martin Wimpress outlines what has changed between the 18.10 release last year and this week's release, calling Ubuntu MATE 19.04 a "modest upgrade." And there are indeed some notable new features so go check out those release notes. But Nvidia graphics card owners -- particularly those who enjoy gaming and may be new to the desktop Linux world -- will discover a new feature I'm thrilled to see.

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Ubuntu News

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 19.04: Release Date, Features, And Details

Filed under
Ubuntu

The dates for the release of Ubuntu 19.04 and a few other milestones which take place in the Ubuntu development cycle were released some time ago. It was revealed that there would actually be no alpha release during the “Disco Dingo” cycle. The official release date for Ubuntu 19.04 was revealed on March 28, 2019. As things were going according to the plan, Ubuntu revealed that the update 19.04 would be coming out on April 18, 2019.

The “Disco Dingo” will have the latest GNOME 3.32, Mesa 19.0 and it will also utilize Linux Kernel 5.0. A lot of features were initially planned for Ubuntu 18. 10, which were postponed until the Disco Dingo development cycle but, the ended up being removed again. Ubuntu 19. 04 was going to have support for Android integration using GSConnect, which a native JavaScript implementation of the KDE Connect protocol, out of the box. This lets the users connect an Android phone to Ubuntu wirelessly.

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Also: Ubuntu 19.04 Backgrounds Slideshow

Ubuntu on Acrosser Hardware and Ubuntu Watch Face for the Samsung Galaxy Watch

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Apollo Lake based network appliance runs Ubuntu

    Acrosser’s Linux-ready “AND-APL1N1FL” network appliance offers an Apollo Lake SoC, 6x GbE ports with 3x LAN bypass, and SATA III storage.

    Acrosser announced an “entry level” and “cost-effective” network appliance for small office network, UTM, mail server, and firewall applications. The AND-APL1N1FL runs Ubuntu 18.04 with Linux Kernel 4.4 and above or Windows 10 IoT Enterprise LTSB on an Intel Apollo Lake SoC.

  • Ubuntu Watch Face for the Samsung Galaxy Watch

    Does your wrist sport a shiny Samsung Galaxy Watch? If so, check out this new Ubuntu-inspired watch face now available on the Galaxy Store

    Designed for use on the Samsung Galaxy Watch and Samsung Watch Active lines (alas, not the earlier Gear S series), the new face features Ubuntu’s ubiquitous purple background and monospace terminal font.

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More in Tux Machines

Nebra Anybeam turns your Raspberry Pi into a pocket home cinema projector

TVs are available to buy in truly huge sizes these days, and with 4K (and upwards) resolution, movies and TV shows really come to life. But there’s something even more magical about watching a film projected onto a screen or a wall. With the right setup, it can be like having a cinema in your home. You don’t necessarily need to spend a fortune on a projector though. Nebra Anybeam can turn your Raspberry Pi into a cinema projector that you can slip into your pocket and take anywhere. Read more Also: Nebra AnyBeam - world's smallest pocket cinema projectors

Back in the Day: UNIX, Minix and Linux

I don't remember my UCSD email address, but some years later, I was part of the admin team on the major UUCP hub hplabs, and my email address was simply hplabs!taylor. Somewhere along the way, networking leaped forward with TCP/IP (we had TCP/IP "Bake Offs" to test interoperability). Once we had many-to-many connectivity, it was clear that the "bang" notation was unusable and unnecessarily complicated. We didn't want to worry about routing, just destination. Enter the "@" sign. I became taylor@hplabs.com. Meanwhile, UNIX kept growing, and the X Window System from MIT gained popularity as a UI layer atop the UNIX command line. In fact, X is a public domain implementation of the windowing system my colleagues and I first saw at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center. PARC had computers where multiple programs were on the screen simultaneously in "windows", and there was a pointer device used to control them—so cool. Doug Englebart was inspired too; he went back to Stanford Research Institute and invented the mouse to make control of those windows easier. At Apple, they also saw what was being created at PARC and were inspired to create the Macintosh with all its windowing goodness. Still, who doesn't love the command line, as Ritchie and Kernighan had originally designed it in the early days of UNIX? (UNIX, by the way, is a wordplay on a prior multiuser operating system called Multics, but that's another story.) Read more

Python Programming Leftovers

GNU/Linux Leftovers

  • USB Support In Chrome OS 75 Will Make Linux Incredibly Versatile
    Chrome OS Linux instances are on the cusp of becoming immensely more useful and versatile based on a recent change spotted by Keith I Myers in the beta-specific Developer Channel following an update to version 75.0.3759.4. That's because while the update inevitably introduced some new bugs that will need to be squashed before a final release, it also included full support for USB devices on the Crostini side of the equation.
  • Old computer? Linux can give it a new lease on life
    The operating system is called Linux and was created in 1991 by Finnish student Linus Torvalds. He released Linux as open source which meant that any good programmer could tinker with it and improve upon the original. Today Linux is a popular free alternative for Windows and Mac computers and used by millions of people. The beauty is that Linux requires much less processing power and memory than Windows and is perfect for older computers.
  • At Least 27% Of Gentoo's Portage Can Be Easily LTO Optimized For Better Performance
    entooLTO is a configuration overlay for Gentoo's overlay to make it easy to enable Link Time Optimizations (LTO) and other compiler optimizations for enabling better performance out of the Gentoo packages. GentooLTO appears to be inspired in part by the likes of Clear Linux who employ LTO and other compiler optimization techniques like AutoFDO for yielding better performance than what is conventionally shipped by Linux distributions. The GentooLTO developers and users have wrapped up their survey looking at how practical this overlay configuration is on the massive Portage collection.  The initial GentooLTO survey has been going on since last October and they have collected data from more than 30 users. The survey found that of the Gentoo Portage 18,765 packages as of writing, at least 5,146 of them are working with the GentooLTO configuration.