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One Mix Yoga 3 mini laptop demostrated running Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

If you are in interested in seeing how the Ubuntu Linux operating system runs on the new One Mix Yoga 3 mini laptop. You are sure to be interested in the new video created by Brad Linder over at Liliputing. “ I posted some notes about what happened when I took Ubuntu 19.04 for a spin on the One Mix 3 Yoga in my first-look article, but plenty of folks who watched my first look video on YouTube asked for a video… so I made one of those too.”

The creators of the One Mix Yoga 3 have made it fairly easy to boot an alternative operating system simply by plugging in a bootable flash drive or USB storage device. As the mini laptop is powering up simply hit the delete key and you will be presented by the BIOS/UEFI menu. Simply change the boot priority order so that the computer will boot from a USB device and you are in business.

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Debian vs. Ubuntu: Best Linux Distro for Laptops, Desktops, and Servers

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Debian
Ubuntu

There is a seemingly endless list of distributions to choose from if you’re interested in Linux. That said, one of the most popular distributions is Ubuntu. If you’ve heard of Linux, chances are you’ve heard of Ubuntu.

You may have heard that Ubuntu is based on another distribution, Debian. Which one should you choose? Is it a matter of preference, or is easy distribution better suited to different use cases?

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Ubuntu: Ubuntu Podcast, Wine Concerns, Parallel Installs and Vanilla Framework 2.0

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E11 – 1942

    This week we’ve been to FOSS Talk Live and created games in Bash. We have a little LXD love in and discuss 32-bit Intel being dropped from Ubuntu 19.10. OggCamp tickets are on sale and we round up some tech news.

    It’s Season 12 Episode 11 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Wine Developers Appear Quite Apprehensive About Ubuntu's Plans To Drop 32-Bit Support

    It's looking like the plans announced by Canonical this week to drop their 32-bit packages/libraries beginning with Ubuntu 19.10 will be causing problems for the Wine camp at least in the near-term until an adequate solution is sorted out for providing their 32-bit Wine builds to Ubuntu users.

    Wine and Steam are among the few prominent Linux software packages still prominently living mostly in a 32-bit world. Valve certainly has the resources to come up with a timely solution especially with Ubuntu being the most popular Linux distribution used by Steam and they can move on with shipping their own 32-bit Steam Runtime libraries and other changes as needed. For the upstream Wine project it might be a bit more burdensome providing 32-bit Wine packages for Ubuntu.

  • Parallel installs – test and run multiple instances of snaps

    In Linux, testing software is both easy and difficult at the same time. While the repository channels offer great availability to software, you can typically only install a single instance of an application. If you want to test multiple instances, you will most likely need to configure the remainder yourself. With snaps, this is a fairly simple task.

    From version 2.36 onwards, snapd supports parallel install – a capability that lets you have multiple instances of the same snap available on your system, each isolated from the others, with its own configurations, interfaces, services, and more. Let’s see how this is done.

  • Vanilla Framework 2.0 upgrade guide

    We have just released Vanilla Framework 2.0, Canonical’s SCSS styling framework, and – despite our best efforts to minimise the impact – the new features come with changes that will not be automatically backwards compatible with sites built using previous versions of the framework.

    To make the transition to v2.0 easier, we have compiled a list of the major breaking changes and their solutions (when upgrading from v1.8+). This list is outlined below. We recommend that you treat this as a checklist while migrating your projects.

Ubuntu: NGINX on Ubuntu Server 18.04, Pick, Departure From i386 and Pop!_OS 19.04 Overview

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Ubuntu
  • How to install the latest version of NGINX on Ubuntu Server 18.04

    NGINX is one of the most popular web servers on the planet. It's reliable, scalable, and easy to use. But did you know, if you install NGINX from the default Ubuntu Server 18.04 repositories, the version you get is out of date? You don't want that. In fact, you probably want the most up-to-date stable release of the software.

  • Pick – A Color Picker for Ubuntu with History Support

    For Ubuntu 18.04 and higher, you can easily install the tool from Ubuntu Software as it has been made as snap package.

  • Ubuntu Confirms It’s Dropping All 32-bit Support Going Forward

    Ubuntu has confirmed plans to drop all support for 32-bit (i386) systems going forward, beginning with the upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 release.

    The decision will mean that the distro no longer builds, packages or distributes any 32-bit software, libraries or tools on newer versions of Ubuntu.

    Users of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS 32-bit are not affected by today’s announcement and will (should?) continue to work as normal, with access to the existing 32-bit archive.

    But the move will mean they are unable to upgrade to a newer Ubuntu release — nope, not even the next LTS!

    Will such a major sounding change have much of an impact?

    Eh, no, not really.

    Ubuntu says it’s stranding a mere 1% of its current user base on 32-bit version Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (which isn’t terrible place to stay, as it is supported until 2023).

  • i386 architecture will be dropped starting with eoan (Ubuntu 19.10)
    Last year, the Ubuntu developer community considered the question of whether
    to continue carrying forward the i386 architecture in the Ubuntu archive for
    future releases.[1]  The discussion at the time was inconclusive, but in
    light of the strong possibility that we might not include i386 as a release
    architecture in 20.04 LTS, we took the proactive step to disable upgrades
    from 18.04 to 18.10 for i386 systems[2], to avoid accidentally stranding
    users on an interim release with 9 months of support instead of letting them
    continue to run Ubuntu 18.04 LTS with its 5 years of standard support.
    
    
    
    
    In February of this year, I also posted to communicate the timeline in which
    we would take a final decision about i386 support in 20.04 LTS[3], namely,
    that we would decide in the middle of 2019.
    
    
    
    
    The middle of 2019 has now arrived.   The Ubuntu engineering team has
    reviewed the facts before us and concluded that we should not continue to
    carry i386 forward as an architecture.   Consequently, i386 will not be
    included as an architecture for the 19.10 release, and we will shortly begin
    the process of disabling it for the eoan series across Ubuntu
    infrastructure.
    
    
    
    
    While this means we will not provide 32-bit builds of new upstream versions
    of libraries, there are a number of ways that 32-bit applications can
    continue to be made available to users of later Ubuntu releases, as detailed
    in [4].   We will be working to polish the 32-bit support story over the
    course of the 19.10 development cycle.  To follow the evolution of this
    support, you can participate in the discourse thread at [5].
  • Ubuntu 19.10 To Drop 32-bit x86 Packages

    Ubuntu and their downstream flavors all stopped shipping x86 32-bit images and now for the 19.10 cycle they have decided to stop their i386 support entirely. Beginning with Ubuntu 19.10, the archive/packages will not be built for x86 32-bit. 

    Longtime Ubuntu developer Steve Langasek announced their decision today that the i386 architecture will be dropped starting with Ubuntu 19.10, affecting all Ubuntu-based platforms / those relying upon the official Ubuntu Eoan archives. 

  • Pop!_OS 19.04 overview | Unleash your potential

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Pop!_OS 19.04 and some of the applications pre-installed.

Your first robotic arm with Ubuntu Core, coming from Niryo

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

Niryo has built a fantastic 6-axis robotic arm called ‘Niryo One’. It is a 3D-printed, affordable robotic arm focused mainly on educational purposes. Additionally, it is fully open source and based on ROS. On the hardware side, it is powered by a Raspberry Pi 3 and NiryoStepper motors, based on Arduino microcontrollers. When we found out all this, guess what we thought? This is a perfect target for Ubuntu Core and snaps!

When the robotic arm came to my hands, the first thing I did was play with Niryo Studio; a tool from Niryo that lets you move the robotic arm, teach sequences to it and store them, and many more things. You can programme the robotic arm with Python or with a graphical editor based on Google’s Blocky. Niryo Studio is a great tool that makes starting on robotics easy and pleasant.

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Zorin OS 15, An Overview for First Time Users

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

This is my first review for Zorin GNU/Linux operating system ever and this is version 15 released at 5 June 2019. Zorin OS is an Ubuntu-based distro with modified GNOME 3 user interface available in 4 different editions: Ultimate, Core, Lite, and Education. This short overview focuses on the Core Edition: it features very friendly and fast desktop, familiar taskbar, complete desktop applications including LibreOffice and GIMP, and Flatpak and Snap supports built-in. It maintains own repositories and PPAs. Zorin OS is suitable to everybody begins trying GNU/Linux. I hope this short article helps everybody to begin Zorin OS.

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DJI spices up Matrice drones with 2nd Gen Manifold computer running Ubuntu with snaps

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Ubuntu

Canonical announced Ubuntu snaps support for DJI’s second-gen Manifold companion computer for its Matrice drones. The Manifold 2 offers a choice of Jetson TX2 or Intel Coffee Lake-U chips.

DJI’s industry leading drones such as its Phantom and Matrice models are directed by flight controllers that run a proprietary operating system. Yet, in 2015, the company announced a Manifold development computer for its Matrice 100 drone that runs Ubuntu on an Nvidia Tegra K1. A few weeks ago, DJI unveiled a more powerful Manifold 2 computer with a choice of Nvidia Jetson TX2 and Intel Core i7-8550U processors (see farther below). Canonical has followed up by announcing that not only will Ubuntu 16.04 return as the pre-installed OS for the device, but that it will include support for Ubuntu snaps application packages.

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Developers Devising Plan To Ship Newer NVIDIA Drivers On Ubuntu Stable Releases

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Ubuntu

Currently NVIDIA's packaged drivers on Ubuntu can get a bit stale on Ubuntu stable releases since they aren't updated in-step with the latest driver releases. But a new stable release update (SRU) policy/exception similar to the Firefox approach is being made for Ubuntu so that new releases will end up working their way into currently supported Ubuntu series.

The Canonical developers working on Ubuntu are really ramping up their support for NVIDIA's proprietary driver. On top of Ubuntu 19.10 to bundle the NVIDIA binary driver into the operating system's ISO image, they are working out the SRU details for shipping newer NVIDIA driver releases on existing Ubuntu stable releases.

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Regolith Linux is the i3 Ubuntu Spin You’ve Been Waiting For

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Ubuntu

Okay, okay. If you are sat there mouthing “what is i3?” at me with a confused, borderline-desperate look on your face, I’ll fill you in:

i3 is a tiling window manager created for X11 (the display manager most Linux distros use, including Ubuntu). i3 supports traditional horizontal vertical window tiling — think window snapping, but arranged and resized automatically — as well as stacking and tabbing.

The differences don’t end there, though.

Like me, you’re probably used to managing app windows with a mouse, but the i3 window manager is largely keyboard driven. The idea is that you use keyboard shortcuts to move, manage and arrange open apps and windows (though you can use a mouse too).

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Give Ubuntu a Bold New Look with the Qogir Theme

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

The background imagery in the Nautilus file manager (the effect also apparently works with Nemo, but I haven’t tested it) is the most visually striking element in the Qogir theme.

It’s a love it/hate it gimmick, which explains why it’s rarely used. Personally I enjoy the visual flourish it adds (though it certainly helps if your desktop wallpaper compliments it).

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SUSE: Release of SUSE CaaS Platform, SUSE Enterprise Storage, SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Service Pack 1 and More

  • SUSE CaaS Platform 4.0 Beta 3 is out!

    SUSE CaaS Platform 4.0 is built on top of SLE 15 SP1 and requires either the JeOS version shipped from the product repositories or a regular SLE 15 SP1 installation. Please note that SLE 15 SP1 is now officially out! Check out the official announcement for more information. Thus you should not use a SLES 15 SP1 environment with the SLE Beta Registration Code anymore. Because the SLE Beta Registration Code has expired now, but you can either use your regular SLE Registration Code or use a Trial.

  • SUSE Enterprise Storage 6 Now Available

    With the current increase in data creation, increased costs and flat to lower budgets, IT organizations are looking for ways to deploy highly scalable and resilient storage solutions that manage data growth and complexity, reduce costs and seamlessly adapt to changing demands. Today we are pleased to announce the general availability of SUSE Enterprise Storage 6, the latest release of the award-winning SUSE software-defined storage solution designed to meet the demands of the data explosion.

  • What’s New for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Arm 15 SP1

    Happy Birthday! It’s been 1 year since we introduced the world’s first multimodal OS supporting 64-bit Arm systems (AArch64 architecture), SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Arm 15. Enterprise early adopters and developers of Ceph-based storage and industrial automation systems can gain faster time to market for innovative Arm-based server and Internet of Things (IoT) solutions. SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Arm is tested with a broad set of Arm System-on-a-Chip (SoC) processors, enabling enterprise-class security and greater reliability. And with your choice of Standard or Premium Support subscriptions you can get the latest security patches and fixes, and spend less time on problem resolution as compared to maintaining your own Linux distribution.

  • Are you ready for the world’s first Multimodal Operating System

    Today, SUSE releases SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Service Pack 1, marking the one-year anniversary since we launched the world’s first multimodal OS. SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP1 advances the multimodal OS model by enhancing the core tenets of common code base, modularity and community development while hardening business-critical attributes such as data security, reduced downtime and optimized workloads.

  • The future of OpenStack?

    Before we can answer these questions, let’s take a look at its past to give some context. Since its original release in 2010 as a joint venture by Rackspace and NASA, and its subsequent spin-off into a separate open source foundation in 2012, OpenStack has seen growth and hype that was almost unparalleled. I was fortunate enough to attend the Paris OpenStack Summit in 2014, where Mark Collier was famously driven onto stage for a keynote in one of the BMW electric sports cars. The event was huge and was packed with attendees and sponsors – almost every large technology company you can think of was there. Marketing budget had clearly been splurged in a big way on this event with lots of pizazz and fancy swag to be had from the various vendor booths. Cycle forward 4 years to the next OpenStack Summit I attended – Vancouver in May 2018. This was a very different affair – most of the tech behemoths were no longer sponsoring, and while there were some nice pieces of swag for attendees to take home, it was clear that marketing budgets had been reduced as the hype had decreased. There were less attendees, less expensive giveaways, but that ever-present buzz of open source collaboration that has always been a part of OpenStack was still there. Users were still sharing their stories, and developers and engineers were sharing their learnings with each other, just on a slightly smaller scale.

  • SUSE Academic Program to be present at 2019 UCISA SSG Conference

    Engaging with the community has always been important for SUSE and this is no different for our Academic Program. That is why next week, the SUSE Academic Program is excited to attend and participate in a three day event hosted by one of the most respected networks in UK education.

Glen Barber: Statement regarding employment change and roles in the [FreeBSD] Project

Dear FreeBSD community:

As I have a highly-visible role within the community, I want to share
some news.  I have decided the time has come to move on from my role
with the FreeBSD Foundation, this Friday being my last day.  I have
accepted a position within a prominent company that uses and produces
products based on FreeBSD.

My new employer has included provisions within my job description that
allow me to continue supporting the FreeBSD Project in my current
roles, including Release Engineering.

There are no planned immediate changes with how this pertains to my
roles within the Project and the various teams of which I am a member.

FreeBSD 11.3 and 12.1 will continue as previously scheduled, with no
impact as a result of this change.

I want to thank everyone at the FreeBSD Foundation for providing the
opportunity to serve the FreeBSD Project in my various roles, and their
support for my decision.

I look forward to continue supporting the FreeBSD Project in my various
roles moving forward.

Glen
Read more Also: FreeBSD's Release Engineering Lead Departs The Foundation

There's A Professional Grade Digital Cinema Camera Powered By Linux

Digital camera startup Octopus Cinema has been designing the "OCTOPUSCAMERA" as a digital cinema camera that's professional grade yet is an open platform with removable/upgradeable parts and this camera platform itself is running Linux. The OCTOPUSCAMERA supports up to 5K full frame recording, weighs less than 1kg, and is powered by Linux. It's a rather ambitious device and they aim to be shipping in 2020. Read more Also: Old Linus Torvalds is back: Linux page caching sparks 'bulls**t' outburst [Ed: Anti-Linux writers of the CBS tabloid ZDNet are mobbing Torvalds into silence again]

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