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Ubuntu

Canonical Announces Snapd 2.0.9 with Full Snap Confinement on elementary OS 0.4

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Ubuntu

Today, June 23, 2016, Canonical's David Callé proudly announced the release and general availability of Snapd 2.0.9 for the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system.

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Flatpak vs. snap wars

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Red Hat
Ubuntu
  • Linux’s RPM/deb split could be replaced by Flatpak vs. snap

    Ubuntu's "snap" applications recently went cross-platform, having been ported to other Linux distros including Debian, Arch, Fedora, and Gentoo. The goal is to simplify packaging of applications. Instead of building a deb package for Ubuntu and an RPM for Fedora, a developer could package the application as a snap and have it installed on just about any Linux distribution.

  • Canonical changes the game by announcing universal snap packages

    Every so often, I get to sit in on a phone call, video chat, or conversation that absolutely blows my mind. Tuesday, June 14 was one such occasion. I was invited to hear Mark Shuttleworth (founder of Canonical, which produces Ubuntu Linux) discuss a major announcement. Naturally, I assumed the announcement had something to do with Ubuntu Touch (maybe they'd found a major US carrier for the Ubuntu Phone). Little did I know the announcement would be so profoundly game changing.

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • The press will believe anything about open source

    Take the case of Canonical's recent pronouncement that it has ended decades of dissonance between competing Linux package management solutions. The lack of thoughtful scrutiny of the claims by the tech press beggars belief. Fortunately, a swelling chorus of critics is rising to put the claims in context, separating the wheat from the chaff in Canonical's attempts to unify Linux distributions.

  • Keynote: More Fun, Less Friction: How Open Source Operations Will Take Big Data to the Next Level

    Solving operational difficulties with a modular, easy-to-use system was the solution Mark Shuttleworth laid out in his keynote entitled “More Fun, Less Friction” at Apache Big Data in Vancouver in May.

  • Removing Operational Friction Will Free Big Data To Do Big Things, Says Mark Shuttleworth

    Good code is cheap; it’s operational knowledge that’s holding back big data from solving the great problems of our time.

    Solving those operational difficulties with a modular, easy-to-use system was the solution Mark Shuttleworth laid out in his keynote entitled “More Fun, Less Friction” at Apache Big Data in Vancouver in May.

  • Announcing Jono Bacon Consulting

    I am really excited about this new chapter. While I feel I have a lot I can offer my clients today, I am looking forward to continuing to broaden my knowledge, expertise, and diversity of community strategy and leadership. I am also excited to share these learnings with you all in my writing, presentations, and elsewhere. This has always been a journey, and each new road opens up interesting new questions and potential, and I am thirsty to discover and explore more.

Ultimate Edition 5.0 LTS Released Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus)

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Ubuntu

After many months of silence, and probably hard work, TheeMahn has finally released a new version of his Ubuntu-based Ultimate Edition computer operating system.

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ubuntuBSD 16.04 Will Feature a Combination of BusyBox and OpenRC, But No systemd

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Ubuntu

In a series of tweets, ubuntuBSD project leader Jon Boden announced a few of the technical features coming to the soon-to-be-released ubuntuBSD 16.04 operating system.

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Why You Should Use Ubuntu LTS

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Ubuntu

One of the most common issues I see among newer Linux users is the desire to upgrade their distribution needlessly to a new bleeding-edge version. This is especially true with those who use Ubuntu and its derivatives. In this article, I'll explain why most people would be much better off sticking to stable distribution releases that have been "in the wild" for six months or longer.

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Snappy vs flatpak

Filed under
Red Hat
Ubuntu
  • Snappy vs flatpak

    There is fierce debate brewing in the Linux community right now. Here we have two rival formats for packaging software. which one will be victorious and become the standard across all Linux desktops ? The answer in our opinion is that both will find a strong following for various reasons. Both will serve the common user, but one will reign supreme for industrial use. From as security viewpoint, at least for now, Flatpak has the advantage.

  • Linux Snap Package Format Goes Multi-Distro

    Snapcraft -- the Linux package format Canonical developed for Ubuntu -- now works on multiple Linux distros, including Arch, Debian, Fedora and various flavors of Ubuntu, Canonical announced last week.

    They're being validated on CentOS, Elementary, Gentoo, Mint, OpenSUSE, OpenWrt and RHEL.

    "Distributing applications on Linux is not always easy," said Canonical's Manik Taneja, product manager for Snappy Ubuntu Core.

  • Goodbye to other packages (rpm & deb), Say Hello to Snaps

    Multiple Linux distributions and companies announced collaboration on the “snap” universal Linux package format, enabling a single binary package to work perfectly and securely on any Linux desktop, server, cloud or device.

Software radio apps are open-source on Ubuntu App Store

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Ubuntu

Lime Micro (London, UK) has announced that Ubuntu is putting together an App Store for LimeSDR that can be accessed once the LimeSDR crowd funding campaign successfully reaches its $500,000 pledge goal. The Snappy Ubuntu App Store will ensure the software defined radio (SDR) apps developed with the LimeSDR board are downloadable and those developed by Lime remain completely open-sourced.

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Peppermint 7 Could Land on June 30, Will Be an LTS Release Based on Ubuntu 16.04

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

In a brief Google+ announcement, the Peppermint OS developers have informed the community about the possible upcoming availability of the Peppermint 7 Linux operating system.

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Ubuntu phone is not yet ready for prime time

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Ubuntu

Phones that run Canonical's Ubuntu Phone operating system have been around for more than a year but given that they appear to be predominantly aimed at European markets, they are a rare sight in Australia.

One cannot blame Canonical, the company behind the phone, for Australia is a very small market and one that tends to follow American trends.

The first Ubuntu phones were released in February 2015 and came in for some criticism because they were under-powered, being a modified version of the Aquaris E4.5. With a 4.5-inch, 540x960 resolution display, a 1.3GHz quad-core MediaTek Cortex A7 processor, 1GB of RAM and 8GB of internal storage, they were not much to write home about.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Canonical, Snappy and the marketing value of collaboration
    Canonical implies it is collaborating with nearly every major Linux distro for its Snappy project. It is not. And what could have been a marketing win for it is now a loss.
  • How to install MongoDB community edition on Ubuntu Linux
    MongoDB is a NoSQL database that avoids the traditional structure of relational databases in favor of document-oriented JSON-like objects. What this translates to is the integration between application and data is faster and easier. If that's not enough, consider this: MongoDB is one the databases preferred by big data and large enterprise companies, including Adobe, Craigslist, eBay, FIFA, Foursquare, and LinkedIn.
  • No WhatsApp, but fixes set to come for Ubuntu Phone
    Users of the Ubuntu Phone will have to get used to the fact that popular Android apps like WhatsApp are unlikely to be made available for the platform, at least not in in the short term. Facebook owns WhatsApp and the communications app now has more than a billion users.
  • Ubuntu Developers Discuss Again About Dropping Support For 32-bit x86
    Ubuntu developers are once again pondering the possibility of dropping support for i386 (32-bit x86) as installation media for their Linux distribution. The matter of dropping Ubuntu i386 ISOs has been brought up many times the past few years, but ultimately it's kept getting pushed back for users still running Ubuntu Linux on old hardware and other reasons. Dropping Ubuntu for i386 keeps getting brought up namely for the installer media rather than the i386 package archive itself.

Sabayon 16.07 Ships with Linux Kernel 4.6.3, Introduces the First LXQt Flavor

Today, June 28, 2016, the developers of the Gentoo-based Sabayon Linux computer operating system have had the great pleasure of announcing the general availability of new respin ISO images for the month of July 2016. Right on the schedule, Sabayon 16.07 Live ISO images are now available for download, switching the OS to the latest Linux 4.6.3 kernel from the deprecated Linux 4.5 branch that shipped with the May ISO respins of the GNU/Linux distribution, Sabayon 16.05. Read more

Android Apps Turn Chromebooks Into Macbook Killers

  • Android Apps Turn Chromebooks Into Macbook Killers
    When Chromebooks launched in the summer of 2011, they seemed destined to fail, much like the underpowered, internet-dependent netbooks that came before them. But in the five years since, Chromebooks have defied expectations, becoming the most used device in US classrooms and even outselling Macs for the first time this year. Still, people complain about their inability to run useful software, but that’s all about to change.
  • Android apps could turn Chromebooks into MacBook killers

today's leftovers

  • Permabit Debuts Only Complete Data Reduction for the Linux Storage Stack
    Permabit Technology Corporation, the leader in data reduction technology, today announced the latest release of its Virtual Data Optimizer (VDO) software, VDO 6. The newest release of VDO delivers the company's patented deduplication, HIOPS Compression™ and thin provisioning in a commercial software package for Linux, expanding availability beyond the OEM marketplace to include the leading Professional Services organizations that are enabling today's modern Hybrid Cloud data centers.
  • My KIWI/OBS talk from oSC'16
    Last Friday, at openSUSE Conference 2016, I was giving a talk together with Christian Schneemann about KIWI and OBS (the events.opensuse.org software is not able to manage "two speakers for one talk", this is why I am not listed in the schedule).
  • AppliedMicro Announces the Availability of its Mudan Storage Platform at Red Hat Summit 2016
  • AsteroidOS smartwatch OS wants you, developers
    AsteroidOS is a new open source operating system specifically designed to serve software application development on smartwatches. The project is now gaining some traction and has been reported to now be looking for developer and community contribution engagement.