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Ubuntu 19.10 Switching to a Full Light Theme, Ditching Dark Headerbars

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Ubuntu

The de-facto Ubuntu artwork team, made up of community enthusiasts hacking on the Yaru GTK theme, have been given the nod to invert the light Yaru theme’s header bar colour.

It means that windows which which currently looks like this:

Think it looks a lot like Adwaita, the upstream GNOME GTK theme? That’s because in a roundabout way the Yaru theme is the Adwaita theme, just with a batch of medications.

Dark header bars and positive accent colours were used to give the Adwaita base an Ubuntu flavoured topping.

But no more.

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Ubuntu Yaru Theme Might Get A Full Light Version

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Ubuntu

Yaru theme might get a full light theme (and a full dark theme that already exists, but with further refinements) instead of the mixed theme that's currently default in Ubuntu.
While users have been voicing their opinion about the need of using a fully light theme with Ubuntu by default, that's not why there are talks to have a Yaru light theme. Instead, it looks like there are issues with the headerbar buttons lack of contrast compared to the background, and this is where the Yaru Light idea comes from.
Feichtmeier, a Yaru theme contributor, sums up the issues with using a mixed theme (light theme with dark headerbar), including in the argument that Gtk is not ready for an inverted headebar, and that "in a normally lightened room at day the dark headerbar is worse usability wise than a light headerbar", also adding that basically all platforms or toolkits use a full light or full dark theme for day/night.

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Ubuntu vs Linux Mint Distro Comparison

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GNU
Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

With the constantly changing system and desktop requirements, our needs for a suitable operating system change too. For people belonging to the programming and software development field, an operating system or a distro matching their work capacity matters a lot. If you are a Linux user and looking for a new Linux distribution for your system, then the two best options you could consider – are Ubuntu, and Linux Mint. Keeping in mind both of the above distros have a number of editions to download from, so we will compare the latest ones for your ease.

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Udemy Class Review: Ubuntu for Beginners

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Ubuntu

Starting up this lecture series you’ll want to skip straight to section 2. The first section is aptly titled “Course Overview” and will list off the topics that will be covered in the course, but there aren’t any real lessons here. Section 2 explains what Ubuntu is and some of the pros and cons of using it as opposed to other operating systems. An important distinction of Ubuntu is there are versions with long-term support with regular software updates, which is uncommon in the Linux world.

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Tiny ZeroPi SBC swaps out GPIO for GbE

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Linux
Ubuntu

FriendlyElec has launched a tiny, $13 “ZeroPi” SBC that runs Linux on a quad -A7 Allwinner H3 with 512MB DDR3 and provides single GbE, USB 2.0, and micro-USB ports — but no GPIO.

FriendlyElec has introduced a headless, open-spec SBC that combines the quad-core, Cortex-A7 Allwinner H3 of its NanoPi Neo with the Gigabit Ethernet port of its Allwinner H5-based NanoPi Neo2. The ZeroPi shares the same 40 x 40mm footprint, USB 2.0 host, micro-USB, and debug header of these earlier models, and it offers the -20 to 70℃ range of the Neo. However, it lacks a GPIO header.

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Dell Has A New Dedicated Site For Ubuntu And RHEL-Certified Linux Desktops And Laptops

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Linux
Red Hat
Ubuntu

For those of you following the Project Sputnik initiative -- a project within Dell to offer and promote a premium range of Ubuntu and Red Hat Enterprise Linux-certified systems -- you've probably had one chief complaint. Finding these systems hasn't been the most intuitive process. Searches on Dell.com can often lead to completely unrelated items, and sometimes it's difficult to find Developer Edition versions of the XPS 13 or Precision Mobile Workstations, for example. That changes today, as Dell has launched a dedicated landing page for its developer-focused Linux desktops and laptops.

In a recent interview with Dell's Project Sputnik lead Barton George, I learned that increasing the overall visibility of these Linux systems is of paramount importance.

Right now you'll be able to find the entire lineup of XPS 13 Developer Edition and Precision Mobile Workstation laptops, as well as 6 different Precision Tower Workstation desktops.

"We had an old landing page from the very beginning for Project Sputnik, but it wasn't going to win any beauty awards," George says. "This new page fits right in with the existing Dell.com responsive template and it looks much slicker. We'd like to grow this over time, because we have more than 160 platforms that ship with Linux."

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Upgrade from Windows 7 to Ubuntu Part 3: Applications

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Ubuntu

After talked about intro and releases, now I will talk about applications on Ubuntu GNU/Linux that are replacements to ones on Windows. You need to know this information in order to switch as the most important thing you really use is the application. For example, if previously you are accustomed to Microsoft Office, MATLAB, and Adobe Reader, on Ubuntu you will use LibreOffice, Octave, and Evince, respectively. More fortunately, just as I said on Part 2, all applications are available for you in the central Ubuntu repository, you do not need to manually search different places anymore. I hope this will be useful for you. Happy reading!

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Ubuntu Dock Might Start Showing Trash and Removable Device Icons

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Ubuntu

Developers working on the dependable desktop dock bar are adding the ability to display icons for attached devices, such as USB thumb drives, external monitors, SD cards, and MP3 players, just like the Unity Launcher does.

Code to support the presence of these items is currently pending upstream (hence it’s not available to try yet). That said, there is no major reason why the code can’t land ahead of Ubuntu 19.10, due next month.

Icons for removable devices and peripherals would house unmount and eject actions (where appropriate) in their respective icon’s right click menu.

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Scaled-back version of Khadas Vim3 starts at $50

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Android
Linux
Ubuntu

Shenzhen Wesion has launched a “Khadas Vim3L” spin of the Vim3 starting at $50 with half the max RAM and eMMC that swaps out the hexa-core A311D for a quad -A55 Amlogic S905D3 with a scaled-back Mali-G31 and 1.2-TOPS NPU. Prices have also dropped on the Vim1 and Vim2.

Shenzhen Wesion’s Khadas project has released a version of its open-spec, community-backed Khadas Vim3 SBC that sells for half the price. The Khadas Vim3L specs are identical except that the maximum RAM and eMMC have been halved to 2GB LPDDR4 and 16GB eMMC 5.1. The Vim3L replaces the powerful Amlogic A311D (4x Cortex -A73 @ 2.2GHz, 2x -A53 @ 1.8GHz) with a 1.9GHz, quad-core Cortex-A55 based Amlogic S905D3. The SoC is similarly fabricated with a 12nm process.

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Linux Mint 19.3 and Monthly News

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu
  • Linux Mint 19.3 To Further Enhance Its HiDPI Support

    Even as we approach 2020, many Linux distributions and various desktop programs still isn't fully optimized for today's modern HiDPI screens. Fortunately for users of Ubuntu-based Linux Mint, their next update will further improve its HiDPI support.

    On tap for Linux Mint 19.3 are reworking several lingering icons/images that were never redone for a HiDPI world, the GTK status icon for system tray icons needs to be optimized still for HiDPI, and other changes.

  • Monthly News – August 2019

    I hope you enjoyed the release of Linux Mint 19.2. It all went really well here, we got very good feedback during the BETA phase and that allowed us to fix a significant number of bugs. The stable release was very well received. It was great to see you happy, and we really enjoyed your comments, in particular about the speed and resource usage improvements in Cinnamon.

    With the stable release behind us, the upgrade path opened and the new packages ported towards LMDE 3, we started work on Linux Mint 19.3. This next release is planned for Christmas, so our development cycle is quite short and we need to move fast.

    Let’s have a look at some of the upcoming improvements.

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