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Ubuntu

ExTiX 20.8 Is the First Distro to Let You Try Linux Kernel 5.8, Based on Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS

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Linux
Ubuntu

ExTiX is where you can try the latest GNU/Linux technologies before they’re available in your favorite OS. The new release, ExTiX 20.8, is based on the upcoming Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS point release to the Focal Fossa series and uses the recently released Linux 5.8 kernel series.

So if you want to test your hardware against Linux kernel 5.8 before installing it on your production machine, you can just download the ExTiX 20.8 live ISO and take it for a spin to see what works and what doesn’t.

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Ubuntu 20.10 “Groovy Gorilla” Artwork by Sylvia Ritter Looks Astonishing, Made with Krita

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Ubuntu

Slated for release on October 22nd, 2020, the upcoming Ubuntu 20.10 release is codenamed “Groovy Gorilla,” continuing Canonical’s tradition to codename new Ubuntu releases in alphabetical order using animal names.

Sylvia Ritter is well known for her amazing artwork, and she did create artwork for all Ubuntu releases in the past. The latest was published today for Ubuntu 20.10, which you can right now her DeviantArt page.

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Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS Release Candidate ISOs Are Now Ready for Public Testing

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS is the first (of many to come) point releases in the latest Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa) operating system series, which is a long-term supported release that will receive updates for up to 10 years.

Initially set to hit the streets on July 23rd, the first point release of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS was delayed for August 6th, 2020. Canonical gave us no reason for the delay, but looking at what happened recently with the BootHole vulnerability found in the GRUB2 bootloader I guess we all know the real reason.

Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS isn’t a major update to the Focal Fossa series. It’s just an updated installation media, which will most likely help newcomers or those who want to deploy Ubuntu 20.04 LTS on new computer, as well as those who want to reinstall their systems, as they won’t have to patch the installations against BootHole, nor download hundreds of updates after the installation.

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Linux Mint Monthly News and Ubuntu Leftovers

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Ubuntu

           

  • Linux Mint Monthly News – July 2020

    I’d like to thank you all for your support. Donations are usually quite high after a release and Linux Mint 20 is no exception. We received 924 donations in a single month! That’s quite an impressive number and it makes us feel really proud, both as a project and a community.

    Linux Mint 20 was well received but it introduced new challenges, both as a release and an upgrade. We’ll be focused on tackling these challenges for the next two years as well as implementing exciting refinements and new features in the upcoming point releases. Some of these are already listed on our Trello boards and roadmaps. I’d rather talk about them once they’re implemented and ready to be shipped though. Hopefully this time next month we’ll be able to give you a preview of some of them.

    In last month’s feedback we noted some users would like Linux Mint to package Chromium. We also observed confusion and lack of empowerment when it comes to dealing with foreign packages during the upgrade. These are two areas we’re looking into at the moment.

    LMDE 4 received many updates lately, including the new features from Linux Mint 20 and Cinnamon 4.6.

    A study on the popularity of Linux Mint releases showed some interested results and comforted some of the perception we had of our user base. 

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  • Charmed OSM Release EIGHT available from Canonical

    Canonical is proud to announce the general availability of OSM release EIGHT images in it’s Charmed OSM distribution. As of Release SEVEN, OSM is able to orchestrate containerised network functions (CNFs) leveraging Kubernetes as the underlying infrastructure for next-generation 5G services. Release EIGHT follows the same direction and brings new features that allow for the orchestration of a broader range of network functions and production environments.

    Open Source MANO (OSM) Release EIGHT is the result of great community work in a project that drives the most complete open source network function virtualisation (NFV) orchestrator in the market.

  • Full Circle Magazine #159

    This month:
    * Command & Conquer
    * How-To : Python, Podcast Production, and Rawtherapee
    * Graphics : Inkscape
    * Graphics : Krita for Old Photos
    * Linux Loopback
    * Everyday Ubuntu
    * Ubports Touch
    * Review : Ubuntu Unity 20.04
    * Ubuntu Games : Mable And The Wood
    plus: News, My Opinion, The Daily Waddle, Q&A, and more.

Has Ubuntu 20.04 Finally Come Far Enough to Take on Windows? It Sure Seems Like It

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Microsoft Windows has become the default operating system on Laptops and PC. So much so that Laptops now come with Windows pre-installed. Previously it used to be the case that many laptop manufacturers used to offer their products with no operating system or DOS. Since Windows 10 came into the world everything changed. You can run Windows 10 for free and get all the updates as well and without using any cracked versions. One could even argue that Microsoft went the Google route with Windows. So is windows better now or not?

Well, it certainly seems that offering your product for free does come with a few compromises. One of the biggest ones is the compromise on Privacy. Most people are just average users who buy a machine and just use it without reading the terms of service and don’t tinker around with the settings. So is it worth it to use Windows still? The answer depends from one person to another but most users will argue that Windows has a polished UI and as a ton of support and software that will run flawlessly on the OS. That aspect of the argument is true if you are a content creator or video editor but if you are a developer or just a tech nerd then it might not be the case.

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Ubuntu-driven Coffee Lake AI system features Myriad X, FPGA, and PoE add-ons

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Ubuntu

IEI’s “FLEX AIoT Dev. Kit” runs Ubuntu on a 8th or 9th Gen Coffee Lake with 2x GbE, 2x HDMI, 4x SATA, 3x M.2, PCIe x4, and 2x PCIe x8 slots with optional Mustang cards with Myriad X VPUs and more.

IEI Integration has launched high-end edge AI computer that runs a “pre-validated” Ubuntu 18.04 stack on Intel’s 8th or 9th Gen Coffee Lake CPUs. The FLEX AIoT Dev. Kit has much in common with its earlier, 8th Gen Coffee Lake FLEX-BX200-Q370 system.

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Mitigating BootHole – ‘There’s a hole in the boot’ – CVE-2020-10713 and related vulnerabilities

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Security
Ubuntu

In this blog post, we will explain more about the vulnerabilities and a behind-the-scenes look about how they were fixed in a coordinated manner across the entire open source ecosystem. To discover the in-depth details of the CVEs and the updated packages which fix the associated vulnerabilities, please visit our Ubuntu Security Knowledge Base article.

To understand the scope of this vulnerability we have to examine the boot process from Secure Boot to Grub. UEFI Secure Boot is designed to ensure that only trusted code is loaded during the boot process. As such, these vulnerabilities could have potentially allowed an attacker to compromise the boot process of the machine, and subvert it for malicious purposes. GRUB2 is used as the bootloader for Ubuntu and many other Linux distributions on both installed systems and installation media. In addition, these vulnerabilities have been present in GRUB2 for quite a long time. In other words, there are a large number of Linux releases and installed instances that could be vulnerable. A high profile vulnerability with such a widespread presence presents a significant challenge to protecting systems and users. For example, how to ensure that security updates can be delivered in a timely manner to both patch the vulnerability on as many existing systems as possible, but to also ensure that any old, vulnerable Linux install media cannot be used in the future to attack existing systems. This requires a coordinated approach across the community of Linux distributions, and also the wider UEFI community including Microsoft and others.

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Also: New Security Hole Puts Windows and Linux Users at Risk

BootHole GRUB2 Bootloader Security Exploit Discovered, Affects Billions Of Windows And Linux Devices

‘BootHole’ Secure Boot Threat Found In Most Every Linux Distro, Windows 8 And 10

Atari VCS FAQ offers fresh console details and focus from COO Michael Arzt

Filed under
Hardware
Gaming
Ubuntu

For about as long as the Atari VCS has been in development, critics have often wondered about who this device is marketed towards and what it’s packing under the hood to execute and deliver once it’s in the living room. To that end, Atari VCS COO Michael Arzt recently published a lengthy FAQ to try to clear up some of the remaining mysteries about the device. Among the many questions taken on, Arzt goes into further detail on the tech of the VCS, as well as Atari’s priorities in game availability and customer appeal.

Michael Arzt published a Q&A on the Atari VCS on Medium on July 29, 2020. The goal of the publishing was to answer many of the common questions that are still coming up in regards to the purpose and priorities of the Atari VCS. Interestingly enough, Arzt claims it’s wrong to think of it as a “retro console” such as the Atari Flashback and other such devices.

“The Atari VCS is a much more powerful PC-based device, with a premium build quality, significantly more power, internet access, and an online store full of games, apps and streaming services, so it really can’t be compared to the “throwback” consoles,” Arzt wrote.

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Canonical/Ubuntu: KubeCon Europe Virtual 2020, Snaps and More

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Ubuntu

  • Canonical at KubeCon Europe Virtual 2020

    This year has been an adventurous one to say the least… but that should get in the way of the community getting together, exchanging ideas, and keeping up with what’s new in the sphere of Kubernetes. In fact, it’s all the more reason to do so!

    That’s why KubeCon and CloudNativeCon is going virtual this year, with expected attendance to be higher than ever before.

    Canonical will be there too, of course, as we have been every other year. This time round, we’re excited to contribute to the conversation with what’s exceptional and what’s new about our multi-cloud Kubernetes portfolio.

  • Soft Mint, no Snap

    “Won’t people think it’s 20 years old?” management asked when they saw our Linux Mint cover. That made us pause. Just how old is Linux Mint? It’s not older than Ubuntu and that’s 15-years old. So we stuck to the facts: Linux Mint 20 is out and it’s about to turn 14-years old on 27 August 2020. That's longer than we would have guessed!
    Largely that’s due to Linux Mint really making a splash back with Mint 13 that adopted the Cinnamon desktop and helped really put Linux Mint on the distro map. The aim was to create a classic desktop, designed how users wanted a desktop to work – an entirely reasonable request.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 641

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 641 for the week of July 19 – 25, 2020.

  • NAKIVO Backup & Replication v10 adds vSphere 7 support and other new features

    NAKIVO customers can now perform application-aware, incremental backups of Linux workstations running Ubuntu 18.04 Desktop and Ubuntu 20.04 Desktop. In addition to full recoveries of entire Linux workstations, NAKIVO Backup & Replication also offers granular recoveries to restore individual files and application objects from compressed and deduplicated backups.

Snap vs. Flatpak vs. AppImage: Know The Differences, Which is Better

Filed under
Red Hat
Ubuntu

Each of the three distribution independent package formats discussed above has its advantage and disadvantages. I think there are still some improvements by each of them to make any of them the main package format for Linux distributions. Luckily, all these package formats can co-exist. You don’t have to stick to a particular package format when you can enjoy software from different package formats.

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More in Tux Machines

Devices: RaspAnd, Raspberry Pi and More

  • RaspAnd Project Now Lets You Run Android 10 on Your Raspberry Pi

    Arne Exton released today a new version of his RaspAnd project that lets you run the latest Android 10 mobile operating system on your tiny Raspberry Pi computer. For $9 USD, RaspAnd 10 promises to make it easier to install Google’s latest Android 10 mobile operating system on your Raspberry Pi computer, but let’s take a look at the new features and improvements it brings over previous versions. First and foremost, RaspAnd 10 is compatible with several recent Raspberry Pi models, including the recent Raspberry Pi 4 with 8GB RAM, but also older models, such as the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B and Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+.

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  • Create a stop motion film with Digital Making at Home
             
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  • The people problem

    Systems used to be designed by groups of engineers. Integration and test engineers waited on the developers and toes tended to get trodden on, with hidden code picked apart and untouchable historic designs questioned - all for product development. There was certainly no room for ego! Today, favourite tools may be replaced by those common to the technologies inside a device. Xilinx Zynq devices have two debug ports to allow individual debugging of the Processor Section or Programmable Logic. On Zynq you can chain these ports into one, so tools that are aware of both worlds deliver greater insight. Other devices may only offer specific insight. Vendors will offer a toolset to work with this, but it may be different to what people are used to. Suddenly, this new wonder-device to solve everyone’s design problems is upsetting the engineering apple cart across all engineering disciplines. [...] Silicon vendors offer a step-up in trying to build Linux for their device, and may offer a pre-built image to boot from. This will need modifying for your needs. It’s amazing how many common command-line tools don’t show up by default. Don’t be fooled into thinking moving from a Raspberry Pi to another platform will be straightforward.

Programming: Python, Rust, PHP, C++ and More

  • Python For Loop: Everything You Need to Know

    Loops are one of the essential elements in any programming language, and Python is not an exception to it. Loops are used to repeat a statement or a block of statements multiple times. If there were no concept of loops in programming languages, we have to write each statement again and again for the number of times we want to execute it. Python provides two types of loops to handle looping requirements, i.e., the while loop and the for loop. In this tutorial, we will learn everything about the for loop statement in Python. Before getting started with this tutorial, It is necessary to have Python installed and set up in your environment path. If you don’t have it installed already, refer to our step by step guide to install Python on Linux. The code presented in this tutorial can be run on the python shell, but it is recommended to run the code in a Python IDE. If you don’t have a python IDE installed in your system or want to know which IDE is a better choice to install, you can refer to our guide Top 10 best python IDE compared.

  • NihAV Is An Experimental Multimedia Framework Written In Rust

    NihAV is an experimental multimedia framework written in the Rust programming language. At the moment it's focused on diving into supporting decoders for different formats that lack open-source support right now / not yet reverse engineered, exploring new approaches for conventional multimedia concepts, and other experiments for advancing audio-video frameworks.

  • rra-c-util 8.3

    n this release of my utility library for my other packages, I finally decided to drop support for platforms without a working snprintf. This dates back to the early 2000s and a very early iteration of this package. At the time, there were still some older versions of UNIX without snprintf at all. More commonly, it was buggy. The most common problem was that it would return -1 if the buffer wasn't large enough rather than returning the necessary size of the buffer. Or, in some cases, it wouldn't support a buffer size of 0 and a NULL buffer to get the necessary size.

  • Embedded Programming and Beyond: An Interview with Warren Gay

    Interested in embedded programming? Warren Gay, an Ontario, Canada-based senior programmer, is an excellent resource for professional programmers, students, and makers alike. Here he talks about his new book, FreeRTOS for ESP32-Arduino (Elektor, 2020), and shares insights about FreeRTOS, ESP32, Arduino, embedded technologies, and more. You are sure to find his input informative and inspiring, especially if you plan to work with ESP32 or Arduino in the near future.

  • PHP 7.1 - 8 new features

    In the PHP 7.0 version function declaration accepts a return type, with the release of 7.1 version functions and parameters can return/accept null by prefixing the data type with a question mark(?). if the data type passed as parameter or returned by a function is different from the type specified a TypeError exception will be thrown.

  • Senior Developers don’t know Everything

    For about 20 years, I’ve been doing C++ and Qt and KDE development. I suppose that makes me a “senior software engineer”, also in the sense that I’ve hacked, programmed, futzed, designed, architected, tested, proved-correct, and cursed at a lot of software. But don’t let the label fool you: I look up just as much in the documentation as I ever did; senior developers don’t know everything.

Software and Games: Cloud Hypervisor, Joplin, Kodi, MuseScore, Bashtop, Grounded

  • Intel Cloud-Hypervisor 0.9 Brings io_uring Block Device Support For Faster Performance

    Intel's Cloud Hypervisor focused on being a Rustlang-based hypervisor focused for cloud workloads is closing in on the 1.0 milestone. With this week's release of Cloud-Hypervisor 0.9 there is one very exciting feature in particular but also a lot of other interesting changes. 

  • Joplin

    Joplin is a free, open source note taking and to-do application, which can handle a large number of notes organised into notebooks. The notes are searchable, can be copied, tagged and modified either from the applications directly or from your own text editor. The notes are in Markdown format. Notes exported from Evernote via .enex files can be imported into Joplin, including the formatted content (which is converted to Markdown), resources (images, attachments, etc.) and complete metadata (geolocation, updated time, created time, etc.). Plain Markdown files can also be imported. The notes can be synchronized with various cloud services including Nextcloud, Dropbox, OneDrive, WebDAV or the file system (for example with a network directory). When synchronizing the notes, notebooks, tags and other metadata are saved to plain text files which can be easily inspected, backed up and moved around.

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  • Kodi 19 Alpha 1 Released With AV1 Decoding, Many Other HTPC Improvements

    Kodi 19 "Matrix" Alpha 1 has been released for this very popular, cross-platform open-source HTPC software.  Kodi 19 is bringing many exciting improvements as a major update to this open-source home theater software. 

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  • Scorewriter MuseScore 3.5 Released with Chord Symbol Playback

    MuseScore, free music composition and notation software, released version 3.5 with long list of new features, bug fixes, and other improvements. MuseScore 3.5 contains one of the most requested features: Chord Symbol Playback. The feature is disabled by default so far. You can enable it by going to Edit > Preferences > Note Input.

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  • Bashtop: An Htop Like System Monitor But Much More Useful

    As cool as Htop there is one thing that it's seriously lacking in and that is system monitoring tools, this may not be a problem for you but if you want a system monitor than bashtop is a much better option to choose, it let's you do most of the process management stuff that you want from htop but it comes with things like hard drive usage, network usage and cpu usage statistics. 

  • An Early Look at Grounded

    You’re in control of a child, who looks like he/she hasn’t entered the teenager years just yet. Among four different children — two boys and two girls — they’ve got a big problem: they’ve been shrunk to the size of an insect. Join them in their adventure — either by yourself or with a group of online friends — as they fight to survive in someone’s backyard, trying to build shelters whilst defending against bugs, and figure out why they’ve shrunk in the first place. Enter Grounded, developed by Obsidian Entertainment — the studio that brought us such titles as Pillars of Eternity, The Outer Worlds, and Star Wars: KOTOR2.

Fedora: LTO, Nest and More

  • Fedora 33 Moving Closer To LTO-Optimizing Packages

    Going back to last year Fedora has been working to enable link-time optimizations by default for their packages. That goal wasn't achieved for Fedora 32 but for Fedora 33 this autumn they still have chances of marking that feature off their TODO list.  LTO'ing the Fedora package set can offer not only performance advantages but in some cases smaller binaries as well. This is all about applying the compiler optimizations at link-time on the binary as a whole for yielding often sizable performance benefits and other optimizations not otherwise possible. LTO is great as we often show in benchmarks, especially in the latest GCC and LLVM Clang compilers. 

  • Zamir SUN: Report for session 1 of FZUG @ Nest with Fedora

    Last month, Alick suggested the Fedora Zhongwen User Group (FZUG) can do a online meetup during Nest with Fedora. And based on the survey, people registered for two time slots, the first one is 9:00 PM Saturday evening UTC+8 which is not a good time for Alick, so I take up the coordinating role for this session. As for the tool, we decided to use Jitsi, as it should work fine for most of us and do not have any limitations. What’s more, it’s totally open source. During the meeting, I firstly introduced Nest with Fedora and it’s previous offline version, Flock to Fedora, to the attendees. It’s interesting to see that during the past years, we not only have new users in China, but also new contributors. One attendee shares that his motivation of being a packager is that deploying packages for their research in the lab is cumbersome before. So he decided to package all into Fedora and then he can just simply install them on every machine. It is good to know that people contribute back because they want to solve their own problems. Maybe this can be a talking point to attract more contributors in the future. After the self introduction, we continue by sharing our interesting stores with Linux. That is a lot of fun.

  • Jon Chiappetta: Last piece of relay software needed for my home bridged network

    If you are running a bridged/relayd network with macs on it you may need to also forward the multicast broadcasts (mDNS related) that allow the devices to automatically discover each other. On the WRT wifi client side, there is a pkg called avahi-daemon and you can configure to operate in “reflector” mode to forward these broadcasts across the specified interfaces. Running this service along with the dhcprb C program which takes care of layer 2 arp requests & dhcp gateway forwarding has been pretty smooth so far!