Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ubuntu

From OSX to Ubuntu

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac
Ubuntu

I didn't debate this for days, I installed the latest available Ubuntu right away as it was the distribution I was using before moving to OSX (I even contributed to a book on it!). I was used to Debian-based systems and knew Ubuntu was still acclaimed for its ease of use and great hardware support. I wasn't disappointed as on the X1 everything was recognized and operational right after the installation, including wifi, bluetooth and external display.

I was greeted with the Unity desktop, which was disturbing as I was a Gnome user back in the days. Up to a point I installed the latter, though in its version 3 flavor, which was also new to me.

I like Gnome3. It's simple, configurable and made me feel productive fast. Though out of bad luck or skills and time to spend investigating, a few things were not working properly: fonts were huge in some apps and normal in others, external display couldn't be configured to a different resolution and dpi ratio than my laptop's, things like that. After a few weeks, I switched back to Unity, and I'm still happily using it today as it has nicely solved all the issues I had with Gnome (which I still like a lot though).

Read more

ExLight Lets You Create Your Own Ubuntu with Enlightenment 0.20 and Linux 4.9

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu

Arne Exton informs us about a new release of his Ubuntu/Debian-based ExLight 64-bit Live Linux operating system, bringing us some of the latest technologies and open-source software projects.

Based on Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) and borrowing various components from both the Debian Stable and Testing repositories, ExLight Build 170105 is now the most advanced version of the GNU/Linux distribution, shipping with a custom Linux 4.9 kernel injected with support for all the modern hardware and the Enlightenment 0.20.99.0 desktop.

These days, almost all of Arne Exton's GNU/Linux distributions come pre-installed with the Refracta tools, an open-source utility that lets users create their own live system with few mouse clicks, and ExLight Build 170105 is no different. It allows you to build your own Ubuntu live system in minutes.

Read more

User Asks Canonical to Backport Mesa 13.0.2 Stable for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS HWE

Filed under
Ubuntu

Remember when Feral Interactive, the UK-based game publisher, asked Canonical to update the old Mesa 3D Graphics Library packages in the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) operating systems?

Read more

Mesa in Ubuntu

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu
  • User Asks Canonical to Backport Mesa 13.0.2 Stable for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS HWE

    Remember when Feral Interactive, the UK-based game publisher, asked Canonical to update the old Mesa 3D Graphics Library packages in the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) operating systems?

    Well, that didn't happen, yet, and users who want to play the latest Linux games have to either compile the latest Mesa 3D libraries from sources or rely on either the well-known Oibaf or Padoka PPAs (Personal Package Archives), which include only development, but highly optimized versions of Mesa and related libraries.

  • Radeon Ubuntu Linux Users Have A Lot To Gain By Upgrading Mesa

    For those curious about the performance difference if upgrading to third-party PPAs from Ubuntu 16.10 when using a modern AMD Radeon graphics card with the open-source driver stack, here are some fresh numbers.

Ubuntu-Based Ultimate Edition 5.0 Gamers Distribution Is Out for Linux Gaming

Filed under
Ubuntu

It's been almost three months since we last heard something from TheeMahn, the developer of the Ultimate Edition (formerly Ubuntu Ultimate Edition) operating system, a fork of Ubuntu and Linux Mint, but we've been tipped by one of our readers about the availability of Ultimate Edition 5.0 Gamers.

The goal of the Ultimate Edition project is to offer users a complete, out-of-the-box Ubuntu-based computer operating system for desktops, which is easy to install or upgrade with the click of a button. It usually ships with 3D effects, support for the latest Wi-Fi and Bluetooth devices, and a huge collection of open-source applications.

Read more

Valve Does a 180: Valve Steam on Linux Ubuntu a Go

Filed under
Gaming
Ubuntu

He did a good job of convincing me that Valve is in the process of developing its products to run natively in Linux…but Valve wouldn’t cop to it. It only admitted it was playing around with Linux. Nothing was official. Interestingly, after the notorious Michael Larabel interview and visit, Valve reps actually insisted in that there was no serious Linux project at all with GamesIndustry.biz, anyway.

Read more

Firmware updates for Ubuntu phones on hold

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu phone users will be stuck with their current firmware for a while as the company has no plans to issue another over-the-air update until it switches package formats, according to Pat McGowan, an employee of Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu.

Read more

Ubuntu and Derivatives

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • The move to snap
  • TedPage: Snapping Unity8

    For the last little while we’ve been working to snap up Unity8. This is all part of the conversion from a system image based device to one that is entirely based on snaps. For the Ubuntu Phones we basically had a package layout with a system image and then Click packages on top of it.

  • We Never Said Ubuntu Phone Is Dead. Here’s What We Actually Wrote Line-by-Line

    I didn't want to write this post but a lot of people are raging at us for writing an article we didn't. So, join me as I go through we actually wrote, line-by-line.

  • Redesigning Bluetooth Settings

    At elementary, redesigns don’t necessarily happen purely as sketches or mockups and they may not even happen all at one time. Many times, we design iteratively in code, solving a single problem at a time. Recently we built out a new, native bluetooth settings pane to replace the one we inherited from GNOME. We took this time to review some of the problems we had with the design of this pane and see how we could do better. Pictured below is the bluetooth settings pane as available today in elementary OS Loki...

  • This Year In Solus (2016 Edition)

    2016 was an incredible year for Solus. We went from having our first release in December of 2015, to completely switching to a rolling release model. We had multiple Solus releases, multiple Budgie releases, several rewrites of different components of Solus, ranging from the Installer to the Software Center. We introduced our native Steam runtime and improved both our state of statelessness as well as optimizations.

    When I first started talking about Solus at the beginning of 2016, I used the analogy that what we were building was the engine for our vehicle, one to deliver us to our goals for Solus. While we’re still building that engine, we’re in a drastically better shape than we were in 2016, and we’re more confident, and bolder, than ever.

Meet the GPD Pocket, a 7-inch Ubuntu Laptop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

The GPD Pocket is a 7-inch laptop that’s small enough to fit in to a pocket — and it will apparently be available with Ubuntu!

As reported on Liliputing, GPD (the company) is currently only showing off a few fancy renders right now, but as they have form for releasing other (similar) devices, like the GPD Win, and Android gaming portables, this is unlikely to be outright vapourware.

Read more

Debian vs. Ubuntu

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu

For the last four years, Debian and Ubuntu have been in the top three Linux distributions on Distrowatch. Since 2005, neither has been out of the top six. But which Linux distro is right for you? You can't go seriously wrong either way, but a useful answer depends upon what you want in a distribution.

You may have heard that Debian is a distribution for experts, and Ubuntu for beginners. That is true, so far as it goes. However, that distinction is more historic than contemporary.

It is true that after Ubuntu burst on to the scene in late 2004, it spent several years making the desktop easier to use, especially for non-English speakers. However, thanks to free licenses, Ubuntu's improvements have spread to most desktop environments.

Moreover, Ubuntu's days of interface innovations are largely in the past. Today, Ubuntu development is focused largely on convergence -- the development of its Unity desktop into a common interface for phones, tablets, and desktops. But since Ubuntu phones and tablets have limited availability, convergence is largely irrelevant to many users. Similarly, Canonical, Ubuntu's parent company, seems more focused on its successful OpenStack division than on desktop development.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Wine-Staging 2.0-RC5 and 'Squad' Might be Coming to GNU/Linux

  • Wine-Staging 2.0-RC5 Improves Compatibility For Origin, GOG Galaxy & More
    Wine-Staging 2.0-RC5 was released on Sunday as the newest version of this experimental/testing Wine build. This time around there are some exciting new patches. On top of re-basing off Friday's Wine 2.0-rc5 release and continuing to maintain quite a number of patches that haven't yet made their way into mainline Wine, a few more patches were added. Upstream Wine is currently under a code freeze until the 2.0 release later this month but that doesn't stop the Wine-Staging crew.
  • Release 2.0-rc5
    Wine Staging 2.0-rc5 improves the compatibility of various applications that require at least Windows Vista or Windows 7. This includes Origin, Uplay, GOG Galaxy and many more. Several bugs were fixed in the PE loader to support loading of packed executables with truncated headers and/or on-the-fly section decompression. If you are using the 64 bit version of Wine, you may also benefit from the memory manager improvements, which allow applications to reserve/allocate more than 32 GB of virtual memory. The memory allocations are now only constrained by resource limitations of the hardware / the operating system and no longer by an artificial design limit in Wine.
  • Looks like FPS game 'Squad' might be coming to Linux soon
    The game uses Unreal Engine and we know already how iffy their Linux support actually is. Hopefully they won't come across too many troubles.

Security News

  • Microsoft slates end to security bulletins in February [iophk: "further obscuring"; Ed: See this]
    Microsoft next month will stop issuing detailed security bulletins, which for nearly 20 years have provided individual users and IT professionals information about vulnerabilities and their patches. One patching expert crossed his fingers that Microsoft would make good on its pledge to publish the same information when it switches to a new online database. "I'm on the fence right now," said Chris Goettl, product manager with patch management vendor Shavlik, of the demise of bulletins. "We'll have to see [the database] in February before we know how well Microsoft has done [keeping its promise]."
  • Reflected XSS through AngularJS sandbox bypass causes password exposure of McDonald users
    By abusing an insecure cryptographic storage vulnerability (link) and a reflected server cross-site-scripting vulnerability (link) it is possible to steal and decrypt the password from a McDonald's user. Besides that, other personal details like the user's name, address & contact details can be stolen too.
  • DragonFlyBSD Installer Updated To Support UEFI System Setup
    DragonFlyBSD has been working on its (U)EFI support and with the latest Git code its installer now has basic UEFI support.

A Look At The Huge Performance Boosts With Nouveau Mesa 17.0-devel On Maxwell

Landing this week in Mesa 17.0-devel Git was OpenGL 4.3 for NVC0 Maxwell and a big performance boost as well for these GeForce GTX 750 / 900 series NVIDIA "Maxwell" graphics processors. Here are some before/after benchmarks of the performance improvements, which the patch cited as "1.5~3.5x better", when testing a GeForce GTX 750 Ti and GTX 980. Read more Also: Fresh Tests Of Intel Beignet OpenCL

Q4OS 1.8.2, Orion

New version 1.8.2 is based on the the most recent release of stable Debian Jessie 8.7, important security patches have been applied and core system packages have been updated. Q4OS Update manager has been rewritten from scratch to provide a robust and reliable tool for safe system upgrades. Other Q4OS specific fixes and under the hood improvements are delivered as usual. All the updates are immediately available for existing Q4OS users from the regular Q4OS repositories. Most attention is now focused on the development of the testing Q4OS 'Scorpion' version 2.2, based on Debian 9 Stretch. Q4OS 2.2 Scorpion continues to be under development so far, and it will stay as long as Debian Stretch will be testing, the release date is preliminarily scheduled at about the turn of April and May 2017. Q4OS 'Scorpion' will be supported at least five years from the official release date. Read more