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Ubuntu 20.10 “Groovy Gorilla” Artwork by Sylvia Ritter Looks Astonishing, Made with Krita

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Ubuntu

Slated for release on October 22nd, 2020, the upcoming Ubuntu 20.10 release is codenamed “Groovy Gorilla,” continuing Canonical’s tradition to codename new Ubuntu releases in alphabetical order using animal names.

Sylvia Ritter is well known for her amazing artwork, and she did create artwork for all Ubuntu releases in the past. The latest was published today for Ubuntu 20.10, which you can right now her DeviantArt page.

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Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS Release Candidate ISOs Are Now Ready for Public Testing

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS is the first (of many to come) point releases in the latest Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa) operating system series, which is a long-term supported release that will receive updates for up to 10 years.

Initially set to hit the streets on July 23rd, the first point release of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS was delayed for August 6th, 2020. Canonical gave us no reason for the delay, but looking at what happened recently with the BootHole vulnerability found in the GRUB2 bootloader I guess we all know the real reason.

Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS isn’t a major update to the Focal Fossa series. It’s just an updated installation media, which will most likely help newcomers or those who want to deploy Ubuntu 20.04 LTS on new computer, as well as those who want to reinstall their systems, as they won’t have to patch the installations against BootHole, nor download hundreds of updates after the installation.

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Linux Mint Monthly News and Ubuntu Leftovers

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Ubuntu

           

  • Linux Mint Monthly News – July 2020

    I’d like to thank you all for your support. Donations are usually quite high after a release and Linux Mint 20 is no exception. We received 924 donations in a single month! That’s quite an impressive number and it makes us feel really proud, both as a project and a community.

    Linux Mint 20 was well received but it introduced new challenges, both as a release and an upgrade. We’ll be focused on tackling these challenges for the next two years as well as implementing exciting refinements and new features in the upcoming point releases. Some of these are already listed on our Trello boards and roadmaps. I’d rather talk about them once they’re implemented and ready to be shipped though. Hopefully this time next month we’ll be able to give you a preview of some of them.

    In last month’s feedback we noted some users would like Linux Mint to package Chromium. We also observed confusion and lack of empowerment when it comes to dealing with foreign packages during the upgrade. These are two areas we’re looking into at the moment.

    LMDE 4 received many updates lately, including the new features from Linux Mint 20 and Cinnamon 4.6.

    A study on the popularity of Linux Mint releases showed some interested results and comforted some of the perception we had of our user base. 

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  • Charmed OSM Release EIGHT available from Canonical

    Canonical is proud to announce the general availability of OSM release EIGHT images in it’s Charmed OSM distribution. As of Release SEVEN, OSM is able to orchestrate containerised network functions (CNFs) leveraging Kubernetes as the underlying infrastructure for next-generation 5G services. Release EIGHT follows the same direction and brings new features that allow for the orchestration of a broader range of network functions and production environments.

    Open Source MANO (OSM) Release EIGHT is the result of great community work in a project that drives the most complete open source network function virtualisation (NFV) orchestrator in the market.

  • Full Circle Magazine #159

    This month:
    * Command & Conquer
    * How-To : Python, Podcast Production, and Rawtherapee
    * Graphics : Inkscape
    * Graphics : Krita for Old Photos
    * Linux Loopback
    * Everyday Ubuntu
    * Ubports Touch
    * Review : Ubuntu Unity 20.04
    * Ubuntu Games : Mable And The Wood
    plus: News, My Opinion, The Daily Waddle, Q&A, and more.

Has Ubuntu 20.04 Finally Come Far Enough to Take on Windows? It Sure Seems Like It

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Microsoft Windows has become the default operating system on Laptops and PC. So much so that Laptops now come with Windows pre-installed. Previously it used to be the case that many laptop manufacturers used to offer their products with no operating system or DOS. Since Windows 10 came into the world everything changed. You can run Windows 10 for free and get all the updates as well and without using any cracked versions. One could even argue that Microsoft went the Google route with Windows. So is windows better now or not?

Well, it certainly seems that offering your product for free does come with a few compromises. One of the biggest ones is the compromise on Privacy. Most people are just average users who buy a machine and just use it without reading the terms of service and don’t tinker around with the settings. So is it worth it to use Windows still? The answer depends from one person to another but most users will argue that Windows has a polished UI and as a ton of support and software that will run flawlessly on the OS. That aspect of the argument is true if you are a content creator or video editor but if you are a developer or just a tech nerd then it might not be the case.

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Ubuntu-driven Coffee Lake AI system features Myriad X, FPGA, and PoE add-ons

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Ubuntu

IEI’s “FLEX AIoT Dev. Kit” runs Ubuntu on a 8th or 9th Gen Coffee Lake with 2x GbE, 2x HDMI, 4x SATA, 3x M.2, PCIe x4, and 2x PCIe x8 slots with optional Mustang cards with Myriad X VPUs and more.

IEI Integration has launched high-end edge AI computer that runs a “pre-validated” Ubuntu 18.04 stack on Intel’s 8th or 9th Gen Coffee Lake CPUs. The FLEX AIoT Dev. Kit has much in common with its earlier, 8th Gen Coffee Lake FLEX-BX200-Q370 system.

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Mitigating BootHole – ‘There’s a hole in the boot’ – CVE-2020-10713 and related vulnerabilities

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

In this blog post, we will explain more about the vulnerabilities and a behind-the-scenes look about how they were fixed in a coordinated manner across the entire open source ecosystem. To discover the in-depth details of the CVEs and the updated packages which fix the associated vulnerabilities, please visit our Ubuntu Security Knowledge Base article.

To understand the scope of this vulnerability we have to examine the boot process from Secure Boot to Grub. UEFI Secure Boot is designed to ensure that only trusted code is loaded during the boot process. As such, these vulnerabilities could have potentially allowed an attacker to compromise the boot process of the machine, and subvert it for malicious purposes. GRUB2 is used as the bootloader for Ubuntu and many other Linux distributions on both installed systems and installation media. In addition, these vulnerabilities have been present in GRUB2 for quite a long time. In other words, there are a large number of Linux releases and installed instances that could be vulnerable. A high profile vulnerability with such a widespread presence presents a significant challenge to protecting systems and users. For example, how to ensure that security updates can be delivered in a timely manner to both patch the vulnerability on as many existing systems as possible, but to also ensure that any old, vulnerable Linux install media cannot be used in the future to attack existing systems. This requires a coordinated approach across the community of Linux distributions, and also the wider UEFI community including Microsoft and others.

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Also: New Security Hole Puts Windows and Linux Users at Risk

BootHole GRUB2 Bootloader Security Exploit Discovered, Affects Billions Of Windows And Linux Devices

‘BootHole’ Secure Boot Threat Found In Most Every Linux Distro, Windows 8 And 10

Atari VCS FAQ offers fresh console details and focus from COO Michael Arzt

Filed under
Hardware
Gaming
Ubuntu

For about as long as the Atari VCS has been in development, critics have often wondered about who this device is marketed towards and what it’s packing under the hood to execute and deliver once it’s in the living room. To that end, Atari VCS COO Michael Arzt recently published a lengthy FAQ to try to clear up some of the remaining mysteries about the device. Among the many questions taken on, Arzt goes into further detail on the tech of the VCS, as well as Atari’s priorities in game availability and customer appeal.

Michael Arzt published a Q&A on the Atari VCS on Medium on July 29, 2020. The goal of the publishing was to answer many of the common questions that are still coming up in regards to the purpose and priorities of the Atari VCS. Interestingly enough, Arzt claims it’s wrong to think of it as a “retro console” such as the Atari Flashback and other such devices.

“The Atari VCS is a much more powerful PC-based device, with a premium build quality, significantly more power, internet access, and an online store full of games, apps and streaming services, so it really can’t be compared to the “throwback” consoles,” Arzt wrote.

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Canonical/Ubuntu: KubeCon Europe Virtual 2020, Snaps and More

Filed under
Ubuntu

  • Canonical at KubeCon Europe Virtual 2020

    This year has been an adventurous one to say the least… but that should get in the way of the community getting together, exchanging ideas, and keeping up with what’s new in the sphere of Kubernetes. In fact, it’s all the more reason to do so!

    That’s why KubeCon and CloudNativeCon is going virtual this year, with expected attendance to be higher than ever before.

    Canonical will be there too, of course, as we have been every other year. This time round, we’re excited to contribute to the conversation with what’s exceptional and what’s new about our multi-cloud Kubernetes portfolio.

  • Soft Mint, no Snap

    “Won’t people think it’s 20 years old?” management asked when they saw our Linux Mint cover. That made us pause. Just how old is Linux Mint? It’s not older than Ubuntu and that’s 15-years old. So we stuck to the facts: Linux Mint 20 is out and it’s about to turn 14-years old on 27 August 2020. That's longer than we would have guessed!
    Largely that’s due to Linux Mint really making a splash back with Mint 13 that adopted the Cinnamon desktop and helped really put Linux Mint on the distro map. The aim was to create a classic desktop, designed how users wanted a desktop to work – an entirely reasonable request.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 641

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 641 for the week of July 19 – 25, 2020.

  • NAKIVO Backup & Replication v10 adds vSphere 7 support and other new features

    NAKIVO customers can now perform application-aware, incremental backups of Linux workstations running Ubuntu 18.04 Desktop and Ubuntu 20.04 Desktop. In addition to full recoveries of entire Linux workstations, NAKIVO Backup & Replication also offers granular recoveries to restore individual files and application objects from compressed and deduplicated backups.

Snap vs. Flatpak vs. AppImage: Know The Differences, Which is Better

Filed under
Red Hat
Ubuntu

Each of the three distribution independent package formats discussed above has its advantage and disadvantages. I think there are still some improvements by each of them to make any of them the main package format for Linux distributions. Luckily, all these package formats can co-exist. You don’t have to stick to a particular package format when you can enjoy software from different package formats.

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Robotics controller runs Ubuntu on AGX Xavier

Filed under
Ubuntu

Adlink’s rugged “ROScube-X” robotics controller runs Ubuntu, ROS 2, Adlink’s Neuron SDK, and AWS RoboMaker on a Jetson AGX Xavier with 2x GbE, 5x USB 3.1, 2x M.2, and optional PCIe, CAN, LTE, and time-sync’d GMSL2 camera I/O.

In May, Adlink announced support for Nvidia’s “Nvidia EGX” AI edge solution on four new edge servers using Nvidia’s Jetson Nano, TX2, AGX Xavier, and Tesla. The Xavier-based model, called the M300-Xavier-ROS2, has now apparently been replaced with a similar ROScube-X controller. The system has fewer USB and serial ports, but additional expansion, including support for optional FAKRA connectors for time-synchronized GMSL2 cameras.

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More in Tux Machines

Debian Janitor: 8,200 landed changes landed so far

The Debian Janitor is an automated system that commits fixes for (minor) issues in Debian packages that can be fixed by software. It gradually started proposing merges in early December. The first set of changes sent out ran lintian-brush on sid packages maintained in Git. This post is part of a series about the progress of the Janitor. The bot has been submitting merge requests for about seven months now. The rollout has happened gradually across the Debian archive, and the bot is now enabled for all packages maintained on Salsa , GitLab , GitHub and Launchpad. Read more

Optimised authentication methods for Ubuntu Desktop

Still counting on passwords to protect your workstation? When set up properly, alternatives to passwords provide a streamlined user experience while significantly improving security. These alternative authentication methods can also easily be combined to create a custom and adaptive authentication profile. This whitepaper introduces three popular authentication methods that provide a solid alternative to passwords. Perhaps you’d like to configure your laptop for login using a YubiKey hardware token connected to a dock. Another option could be to login with a Duo push notification when not connected to the dock, but use a Google Authenticator one-time password when no network is available. Maybe you need a separate hardware token just for ssh authentication, and you always need to keep a long, complex password for emergency authentication should all other methods fail. All of these scenarios can be easily configured within Ubuntu. Read more

Open Hardware: Arduino, RISC-V and 96Boards

  • Arduino-controlled robot arm is ready to play you in a game of chess

    If you’re tired of playing chess on a screen, then perhaps you could create a robotic opponent like Instructables user Michalsky. The augmented board runs micro-Max source code, enabling chess logic to be executed on an Arduino Mega with room for control functions for a 6DOF robotic arm. The setup uses magnetic pieces, allowing it to pick up human moves via an array of 64 reed switches underneath, along with a couple shift registers. The Mega powers the robot arm accordingly, lifting the appropriate piece and placing it on the correct square.

  • New RISC-V CTO On Open Source Chip Architecture’s Global Data Center Momentum

    With more big international players on board, the foundation's new head of technology sees signs of "state of the art moving forward."

  • Snapdragon 410 based 96Boards CE SBC gets an upgrade

    Geniatech has launched a Linux-ready, $109 “Developer Board 4 V3” compliant with 96Boards CE that offers a Snapdragon 410E, GbE, 3x USB, 802.11ac, GPS, and-25 to 70°C support. Geniatech has released a V3 edition of its 96Boards CE form-factor Developer Board 4 SBC, the third update of the Development Board IV we covered back in 2016. Starting at $109, the Developer Board 4 V3 still runs Linux, Android, and Windows 10 IoT Core on Qualcomm’s 1.2GHz, quad -A53 Snapdragon 410m, although it has been upgraded to the 10-year availability Snapdragon 410E. Geniatech also sells a line of Rockchip based SBCs, among other embedded products.

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack and Linux Headlines

  • LHS Episode #360: Zapped

    Welcome to the 360th episode of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this short-topic show, the hosts discuss 1.2GHz distance records, a hybrid antenna for geosynchronous satellite operation, data mode identification for your smart phone, being pwned, Ubuntu 20.04.1, LibreOffice, HamClock and much more. Thanks for listening and hope you have a great week.

  • LHS Episode #361: The Weekender LIV

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

  • 2020-08-14 | Linux Headlines

    Google could be extending its Firefox search royalty deal, PyPy leaves the Software Freedom Conservancy, Ubuntu puts out a call for testing, Linspire removes snapd support, Microsoft showcases its open source contributions, and Facebook joins The Linux Foundation.