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Ubuntu

Intel Joule SOM runs Ubuntu Core Linux and makes Raspberry Pi look like garbage

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Hardware
Ubuntu

The original Raspberry Pi sparked the creativity of many developers and students, but it was woefully underpowered. Through several iterations, however, it slowly became more powerful. While the most recent version -- the Raspberry Pi 3 -- has a much more capable processor, some developers will still want even more horsepower.

Today, Intel announces a maker board that puts the Raspberry Pi 3 to shame. The Joule system-on-module mini-computer features RealSense camera support and runs Ubuntu Linux Core. Best of all, its specs are very impressive for what it is.

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From Ubuntu to openSUSE: Notes on Photographic Workflow Migration

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SUSE
Ubuntu

There is no such thing as the best Linux distribution for photographers. With some tweaking, any mainstream distro can be turned into a solid platform for managing and processing photos. After all, digiKam, Darktable, gThumb, and other popular photographic tools can be easily deployed on practically any Linux distribution with a minimum of effort.

The devil is in the detail, though, and small things might require some adjustments. My recent migration from Ubuntu to openSUSE Tumbleweed is a case in point. Most of the tools I use in my photographic workflow are available in openSUSE’s official software repositories, so deploying them was a rather straightforward affair. But there were a few things that needed some tweaking.

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Canonical to Bring Snappy Ubuntu Core to Advantech's x86-Based IoT Gateways

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Ubuntu

Today, August 16, 2016, Canonical, the company behind the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system, informed Softpedia about a strategic partnership with Advantech to bring the Snappy Ubuntu Core OS to its x86-based IoT gateways.

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Netrunner Linux Becomes Maui, Now Based on KDE Neon and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

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KDE
Linux
Ubuntu

The Netrunner development team is pleased to announce the immediate availability for download of the first stable release of the Maui, their new GNU/Linux distribution based on the KDE Neon project.

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Ubuntu Leftovers

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Ubuntu

Converged Terminal App Design in Ubuntu

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Ubuntu
  • Canonical Show Off Converged Terminal App Design

    Reshaping the classic terminal app to fit multi-form factor world isn't easy, but it's the task that the Canonical Design team face as part of their work on Unity 8.

  • Canonical Plans on Improving the Ubuntu Linux Terminal UX on Mobile and Desktop

    Canonical, through Jouni Helminen, announced on August 15, 2016, that they were planning on transforming the community-developed Terminal app into a convergent Linux terminal that's easy to use on both mobile phones and tablets.

    Terminal is a core Ubuntu Touch app and the only project to bring you the popular Linux shell on your Ubuntu Phone or Ubuntu Tablet devices. And now, Canonical's designers are in charge of offering a much more pleasant Linux terminal user experience by making Terminal convergent across all screen formats.

    "I would like to share the work so far, invite users of the app to comment on the new designs, and share ideas on what other new features would be desirable," says Jouni Helminen, Lead Designer at Canonical. "These visuals are work in progress - we would love to hear what kind of features you would like to see in your favorite terminal app!"
    ""

Speed boost for Ubuntu

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Ubuntu
HowTos

MY Linux desktop PC (dual core 3GHz Pentium D and 4GB RAM) has been showing its age recently so I looked online for ways to bring back some of its old snap.

I had recently upgraded to Ubuntu 16.04 and found, for the most part, that my old PC was still capable of running it quite well. But I noticed that the flashy animation and 3D effects were slowing down some applications, making them feel sluggish. Much as I like my eye candy, I like a smooth-running PC better, so I decided to ditch the animations.

To do this, I used Classic GNOME Flashback, a 2D desktop environment that’s clean and easy to use. The quickest way to install it is to open a terminal (Ctrl-Alt-T) and type these two commands (followed by Enter):

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Leftovers: Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

I’ve Illustrated All Animal Code Names Of Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

I’m Sylvia, an artist, illustrator and game developer from Germany. I’m a huge fan of the open source operating system Ubuntu and I love to paint animals.

The Ubuntu releases inspired me to create a series of illustrations, each illustration depicting an animal from a release, in chronological order. I’ve just completed 25 animals, starting with the Warty Warthog (Ubuntu 4.10) and finishing with the latest release, Yakkety Yak (16.10). All animals have been painted with my favorite open source software Krita.

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Ubuntu Touch Mobile OS to Be Soon Rebased on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, Not Yakkety Yak

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Ubuntu

One of our readers was asking us last week if we have any news on when Ubuntu Touch will switch to a newer version of Ubuntu? The official answer came a few days ago from Canonical's Łukasz Zemczak, who reveals the fact that the Ubuntu mobile OS will soon be rebased on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus).

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today's leftovers

Linux Development and LinuxCon

  • Linus Torvalds says GPL was defining factor in Linux's success
    Linus Torvalds and Dirk Hohndel, vice president and chief of open source at VMware, discussed the role that GNU GPL played in the success of Linux during a keynote conversation this week at LinuxCon NA in Toronto. Hohndel, who has been involved with the kernel for a very long time, said that during the past 25 years there have been many challenges, and one of the biggest challenges was the possibility of fragmentation. "How do we keep one single kernel?" he asked. "I used to be worried about fragmentation, and I used to think that it was inevitable at some point," said Torvalds. “Everyone was looking at the history of Linux and comparing it with UNIX. People would say that it’s going to fail because it's going to fragment. That's what happened before, so why even bother?" What made the difference was the license. "FSF [Free Software Foundation] and I don't have a loving relationship, but I love GPL v2," said Torvalds. "I really think the license has been one of the defining factors in the success of Linux because it enforced that you have to give back, which meant that the fragmentation has never been something that has been viable from a technical standpoint."
  • Making Use Of eBPF In The Mainline Linux Kernel
    One of the exciting innovations within the Linux kernel in the past few years has been extending the Berkeley Packet Filter (BPF) to become a more generalized in-kernel virtual machine. The eBPF work with recent versions of the Linux kernel allow it to be used by more than just networking so that these programs can be used for tracing, security, and more.
  • Linux turns 25 with a brilliant history
    Chances are, you use it every day. Linux runs every Android phone and tablet on Earth. And even if you’re on an iPhone or a Mac or a Windows machine, Linux is working behind the scenes, across the Internet, serving up most of the webpages you view and powering most of the apps you use. Facebook, Google, Pinterest, Wikipedia—it’s all running on Linux. Now, Linux is finding its way onto televisions, thermostats, and even cars. As software creeps into practically every aspect of our lives, so does the OS designed by Linus Torvalds.
  • Intel Lost Another Open-Source Driver Developer To Google Earlier This Summer
    There was another long-time Intel open-source Linux graphics driver developer that left the company earlier this summer and is now working at Google on the Chrome/Chromium OS graphics stack. Among the notable departures in the past few months from Intel's Open-Source Technology Center were Jesse Barnes, Wayland-founder Kristian Høgsberg, and Dirk Hohndel and apparently others that went under the radar or outside of our area of focus. Another graphics driver developer no longer at Intel is Chad Versace.
  • OpenGL ES 3.1 For Haswell Lands With Intel's Mesa Driver