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Ubuntu

Tiny, open spec quad -A53 SBC sells for $15

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Ubuntu

FriendlyElec’s 40 x 40mm, Ubuntu Core ready “NanoPi Neo2” updates the Neo with a 64-bit Allwinner H5 and a GbE port.

FriendlyElec (FriendlyARM) has added to its line of tiny, open spec NanoPi Neo SBCs with a Neo2 model that advances to an ARMv8 architecture. Whereas the similarly 40 x 40mm NanoPi Neo and wireless-enabled NanoPi Neo Air run Ubuntu Core on a quad-core, Cortex-A7 Allwinner H3 clocked to 1.2GHz, the NanoPi Neo2 moves up to a quad-core, Cortex-A53 Allwinner H5. The A5, which is also found on the Orange Pi PC 2 hacker SBC, is joined by a higher-end Mali-450 GPU. No clock rate is specified.

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Robotics savvy BeagleBone Blue SBC turns on the servos

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Debian
Ubuntu

BeagleBoard.org’s $80 “BeagleBone Blue” robotics SBC runs Debian on an Octavo SiP, and adds motion control and battery friendly power to the BB Black.

BeagleBoard.org first showed off a prototype of its robotics-targeted, community backed BeagleBone Blue back in Jan. 2016. The BeagleBone Black spin-off was designed and developed in coordination with the UCSD Coordinated Robotics Lab, and has been tested by hundreds of students. BeagleBoard.org has now launched the open-spec, Linux-driven SBC with Arrow, Element14, and Mouser offering prices ranging from $80 to $82.

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MATE 1.18 Desktop Environment Released, Focuses on Completing the GTK3 Migration

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu MATE leader and MATE developer Martin Wimpress is proud to announce today, March 14, 2017, the general and immediate availability of the MATE 1.18 desktop environment.

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Orion Ubuntu Laptop Review: The Powerful MacBook Pro Alternative

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Reviews
Ubuntu

The choice of a new laptop for many consumers is still seen as the head-to-head comparison of Microsoft’s Windows 10 or Apple’s macOS. The third option of moving to a Linux-powered machine has always been a much trickier prospect. A dizzying range of Linux "flavors" coupled with the mysteries of hardware support stops many adept users from making the switch. What if you had an off-the-shelf approach to Linux hardware that just worked?

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Leftovers: Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

It Looks Like Ubuntu 17.04 Might Ship with Mesa 17.0.1 and X.Org Server 1.19.2

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

How Ubuntu is helping to optimize Google Cloud

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Google
Software
Interviews
Ubuntu

While the products that Ubuntu provides — such as Canonical Livepatch Service and Juju — are well-known in the cloud community, its corporate stance is not as recognized. It’s hoping to change that perception.

“Ubuntu is a very popular [operating system], and we are most dominant in public cloud,” explained Udi Nachmany, vice president of public cloud at Ubuntu.

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Canonical Releases New Kernels for Ubuntu Linux to Fix a Single Vulnerability

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Security
Ubuntu

Canonical published several security advisories to inform Ubuntu users about new kernel versions for their Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) operating systems.

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QNAP Announces TS-453Bmini NAS That Supports Ubuntu Linux

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Linux
Ubuntu

NAS boxes have changed a lot over the years. From dumb storage, to multi-user storage, routing and network services, to web servers, to cloud servers, to full-blown media centers and PCs that can perform all of the above. QNAP is one of the leading NAS providers and it’s now releasing a new model with a lot of functionality.

The TS-453Bmini is a 64-bit quad-core 4-bay NAS built using an Intel J3455 Celeron processor, and is an update to the 2015 model, the TS-453mini (no B in the name). It’s a 10W TDP CPU that’s built on Apollo Lake, the successor to Braswell, and is the same generation chip as Kaby Lake (but for low power devices).

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Core i7 6800K Linux CPU Scaling Benchmarks With Ubuntu 16.10

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

Earlier today I posted some Linux game CPU scaling benchmarks using a Core i7 6800K Broadwell-E For showing how current Linux games make use of (or not) multiple CPU cores, which originated from discussions by Linux gamers following the AMD Ryzen CPU launch with how many cores are really needed. While going through the process of running those Linux game CPU scaling benchmarks, I also ran some other workloads for those curious.

For those wondering how other Linux CPU-focused workloads are scaling across multiple CPU cores with recent versions of the Linux kernel and distributions, such as Ubuntu 16.10 with Linux 4.8, you may find these additional data-sets interesting. Some of the used tests are also in common with this weekend's AMD Ryzen CPU Core Scaling Performance article.

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Also: CPUFreq Governor Tuning For Better AMD Ryzen Linux Performance

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Today in Techrights

Leftovers: OSS

  • Are Low-Code Platforms a Good Fit for Feds?
    Open-source code platforms — in part, because they’re often free — have long been a popular choice for digital service creation and maintenance. In recent years, however, some agencies have turned to low-code solutions for intuitive visual features such as drag-and-drop design functionality. As Forrester Research notes, low-code platforms are "application platforms that accelerate app delivery by dramatically reducing the amount of hand-coding required."
  • Crunchy Data Brings Enterprise Open Source POSTGRESQL To U.S. Government With New DISA Security Technical Implementation Guide
    Crunchy Data — a leading provider of trusted open source PostgreSQL and enterprise PostgreSQL technology, support and training — is pleased to announce the publication of a PostgreSQL Security Technical Implementation Guide (STIG) by the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), making PostgreSQL the first open source database with a STIG. Crunchy Data collaborated with the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) to evaluate open source PostgreSQL against the DoD's security requirements and developed the guide to define how open source PostgreSQL can be deployed and configured to meet security requirements for government systems.
  • Democratizing IoT design with open source development boards and communities
    The Internet of Things (IoT) is at the heart of what the World Economic Forum has identified as the Fourth Industrial Revolution, an economic, technical, and cultural transformation that combines the physical, digital, and biological worlds. It is driven by such technologies as ubiquitous connectivity, big data, analytics and the cloud.

Software and today's howtos

Security and Bugs

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Devops embraces security measures to build safer software
    Devops isn’t simply transforming how developers and operations work together to deliver better software faster, it is also changing how developers view application security. A recent survey from software automation and security company Sonatype found that devops teams are increasingly adopting security automation to create better and safer software.
  • This Xfce Bug Is Wrecking Users’ Monitors
    The Xfce desktop environment for Linux may be fast and flexible — but it’s currently affected by a very serious flaw. Users of this lightweight alternative to GNOME and KDE have reported that the choice of default wallpaper in Xfce is causing damaging to laptop displays and LCD monitors. And there’s damning photographic evidence to back the claims up.