Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ubuntu

Debian, Ubuntu, and Mint

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian LTS work, November 2017

    I was assigned 13 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative and carried over 14 hours from September. I worked all 17 hours.

  • Mini-DebConf Cambridge 2017

    Last week I attended Cambridge's annual mini-DebConf. It's slightly strange to visit a place one has lived in for a long time but which is no longer home. I joined Nattie in the 'video team house' which was rented for the whole week; I only went for four days.

  • Ubuntu Desktop Weekly Update: December 1, 2017

    GNOME Disk Utility If you have snaps installed and open the Disks utility, your snaps appear as loop devices. We found this to be confusing and a bit messy, so we have proposed a fix upstream and this should be merged soon.

  • Ubuntu Podcast: S10E39 – Hysterical Daffy Furniture
  • Ubuntu 17.10 Brings Back GNOME Desktop Environment

    Ubuntu is one of the most popular Debian-based Linux distributions, and it’s undergone a lot of changes. Most recently, Canonical, the developer collective behind Ubuntu, switched from the GNOME desktop environment to an in-house alternative called Unity. But the most recent version of Ubuntu, 17.10, brings back GNOME 3.26.

    With GNOME comes GDM (GNOME Display Manager), a tweakable settings menu that replaces Unity’s LightDM. GNOME’s ecosystem makes it arguably easier to customize than the latter — unlike previous versions of Ubuntu, for example, you can change the location of the Windows control buttons (minimise, fullscreen and close) in just a few button presses.

  • Linux Mint 18.3 'Sylvia' KDE and Xfce betas available for download, but don't bother

    Linux Mint is a great operating system that I recommend highly. It is based on the rock-solid Ubuntu 16.04, meaning it is stable and compatible with many packages. For Windows converts in particular, Linux Mint with the Cinnamon desktop environment can be a very inviting first-time distribution that should offer a positive experience. The Mate DE variant is a solid choice too -- if your hardware is a bit anemic, that is.

Unity on Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Big Unity Desktop Update Coming to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

    A sled load of Unity desktop bug fixes are on their way to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

    Ubuntu may have ditched Unity as its default desktop of choice but Canonical is committed to maintaining the desktop (and its related technology stack) for the duration of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

    And as proof of that commitment they are currently preparing to a sizeable stable release update (SRU) for Xenial desktops, which should roll out to all users well before Christmas is upon us.

  • Ubuntu Unity Remix? Are We Going To Get A New Ubuntu “Unity” Flavor In Future?

    With Ubuntu 17.10 release, Canonical made a move from Unity desktop environment to GNOME. Canonical tried to keep some Unity feel and gave the new GNOME edition a makeover. While many welcomed this step, many people expressed their concerns and support for Ubuntu Unity.

    It looks like some members of the Ubuntu family are making efforts to turn Ubuntu Unity into an official LTS distribution of Unity. Spotted by OMG Ubuntu, this proposal has already the backing of a former Compiz/Unity dev. Also, many Canonical employees are offering their support to the same.

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Will Soon Get an Important Unity Stack Update with 27 Bug Fixes

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

When Mark Shuttleworth said Canonical wouldn't develop Unity anymore, there were rumors that Unity 7 will also no longer receive any maintenance work. But Canonical shattered those rumors and said it would continue to patch things in the Unity Stack for supported releases, such as Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

Truth be told, we didn't actually see any signs of life support for Unity since that announcement, but it looks like the team responsible for keeping the desktop environment bug-free has done some great work lately and managed to squash no less than 27 bugs for the Unity Stack in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus).

Read more

Someone Tries to Bring Back Ubuntu's Unity from the Dead as an Official Spin

Filed under
Ubuntu

Long-time Ubuntu member Dale Beaudoin ran a poll last week on the official Ubuntu forums to take the pulse of the community and see if they are interested in an Ubuntu Unity Remix that would be released alongside Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) next year and be supported for nine months or five years.

Thirty people voted in the poll, with 67 percent of them opting for an LTS (Long Term Support) release of the so-called Ubuntu Unity Remix, while 33 percent voted for the 9-month supported release. It also looks like this upcoming Ubuntu Unity Spin looks to become an official flavor, yet this means commitment from those developing it.

Read more

Ubuntu Unity Remix 18.04: Quick Look, More Info & Download Links

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

First, I like Unity. While I saw news about Unity 7 abandonment and Canonical's decision to use GNOME instead, I believed that someday a new Ubuntu with Unity 7 will come. The Ubuntu Unity Remix is now likely the answer to my expectation. So this new Unity 7 revival project makes me happy and I believe, many of you will be happy too. Second, my expectation is of course Ubuntu Unity Remix to become official flavor next year. Third, I hope the developers could provide 32bit version so the users using old computers can still use it. Fourth, finally, let us help the development of Ubuntu Unity Remix by informing the others about it or by directly joining the team. Thank you Ubuntu Unity Remix developers!

Read more

Also: Fans of “Unity Desktop” Are Working on a New Remix

Ubuntu 17.10: Return of the GNOME

Filed under
GNOME
Reviews
Ubuntu

If you've been following the Linux world at all, you know this has been an entire year for spring cleaning. Early in 2017, Canonical stopped work on its homegrown Unity desktop, Mir display server, and its larger vision of "convergence"—a unified interface for Ubuntu for phones, tablets, and desktops.

And now almost exactly six years after Ubuntu first switched from GNOME 2 to the Unity desktop, that has been dropped, too. The distro is back to GNOME, and Canonical recently released Ubuntu 17.10, a major update with some significant changes coming to the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system.

Read more

Linux Mint 18.3

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu
  • Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" Officially Released with Cinnamon and MATE Editions

    The Linux Mint team announced a few moments ago the general availability of the Cinnamon and MATE editions of their latest Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" operating system.

    Dubbed Sylvia, Linux Mint 18.3 is now officially out with the latest Cinnamon 3.6 and MATE 1.18 desktop environments. The distribution is powered by the Linux 4.10 kernel from Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and includes many new features and improvements, along with updated components from the upstream software repositories.

  • Linux Mint 18.3 “Sylvia” Cinnamon released!

    Linux Mint 18.3 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2021. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

  • Linux Mint 18.3 “Sylvia” MATE released!

    Linux Mint 18.3 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2021. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

  • Linux Mint 18.3 released

    Linux Mint has released 18.3 "Sylvia" in Cinnamon and MATE editions. Linux Mint 18.3 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2021. Both editions feature a revamped Software Manager with support for flatpaks. See more about what's new in the Cinnamon and MATE editions or check out the release notes for Cinnamon and MATE.

Ubuntu in transition: what's in store for the popular Linux distro?

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

We decided that Gnome Shell was the right toolkit for our users. We’ve used Unity 7 for six or seven years and all the core set of applications were built around the Gnome desktop, so going to Gnome made the most sense. The transition path between Unity 7 and Gnome on the desktop was hopefully going to be fairly straightforward, quite smooth and it’s turned out to be that way. So now we’ve got the latest Gnome desktop running on Ubuntu.

Read more

Aquaris M10 Ubuntu tablet - With Android

Filed under
Android
Ubuntu

I am slightly sad that I decided to give up on Ubuntu on this tablet. But it's also a happy decision, because I have a functional, capable device now, and I can use it to the full range of its specification and abilities. Simple value for money, and there are no sentiments there.

Now, let's be reasonable, I'm not gonna be seen gallivanting into the sunset with a tablet in my hand. This will be strictly opportunistic, on-the-go use, 90% experimentation and novelty, 10% real use. Still, when I take into consideration the last four years or my tablet usage, a pattern appears, and it's a positive one, even though tablets are unnecessary in between smartphones and laptops.

All that said, BQ Aquaris M10 FHD with Android is a decent device, and it works well. I wish the situation was different with Ubuntu, but it isn't. On the desktop, it remains one of the more sensible Linux options, but it never had what's needed to succeed in the brutal touch world. Well, a new hope is born, and we shall see what gives. To be continued.

Read more

Recommended GNOME Shell Extensions for Ubuntu 17.10

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

This is a list of GNOME Shell Extensions (GSE) that are very useful for Ubuntu 17.10 users. Among them are NetSpeed (to show up/down speed), Dash to Panel (to combine all panels into single bottom panel), Datetime Format (to show complete day-date-clock at top panel), even EasyScreenCast (to record your desktop activity to video), and more. They are handy for many user's daily/repeating tasks, easy to install, and user-friendly to operate. Finally, I hope this recommendation article is useful for you.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

An introduction to Joplin, an open source Evernote alternative

Joplin is an open source cross-platform note-taking and to-do application. It can handle a large number of notes, organized into notebooks, and can synchronize them across multiple devices. The notes can be edited in Markdown, either from within the app or with your own text editor, and each application has an option to render Markdown with formatting, images, URLs, and more. Any number of files, such as images and PDFs, can be attached to a note, and notes can also be tagged. I started developing Joplin when Evernote changed its pricing model and because I wanted my 4,000+ notes to be stored in a more open format, free of any proprietary solution. To that end, I have developed three Joplin applications, all under the MIT License: for desktop (Windows, MacOS, and Linux), for mobile (Android and iOS), and for the terminal (Windows, MacOS, and Linux). All the applications have similar user interfaces and can synchronize with each other. They are based on open standards and technologies including SQLite and JavaScript for the backend, and Terminal Kit (Node.js), Electron, and React Native for the three front ends. Read more

Open Source OS Still supporting 32-bit Architecture and Why it’s Important

One after the other, Linux distributions are dropping 32-bit support. Or, to be accurate, they drop support for the Intel x86 32-bit architecture (IA-32). Indeed, computers based on x86_64 hardware (IA-64) are superior in every way to their 32-bits counterpart: they are more powerful, run faster, are more compact, and more energy efficient. Not mentioning their price has considerably decreased in just a few years. If you have the opportunity to switch to 64 bits, do it. But, to quote a mail I received recently from Peter Tribble, author of Tribblix: “[… ] in the developed world we assume that we can replace things; in some parts of the developing world older IA-32 systems are still the norm, with 64-bit being rare.” Read more

KDE Applications 17.12 Lands with Dolphin Enhancements, HiDPI Support for Okular

KDE Applications 17.12 has been in development for the past several months and it's now available as a drop-in replacement for the previous series of the software suite, KDE Applications 17.08, which reached end of life in early November. As expected, several of the included apps received various enhancements and new features in this release. Among these, we can mention that the Dolphin file manager is now capable of saving searches, can limit the search only to folders, makes renaming of files easier by allowing the user to simply double-click on the file name, displays extra information about files like origin URL of downloaded file or modification date, and introduces new Bitrate, Genre, and Release Year columns. Read more Also: KDE Applications 17.12 Brings HiDPI Improvements, Rest Of KDE Games Ported To KF5 KDE Ships KDE Applications 17.12.0

Stable kernels 4.14.6 and 4.9.69

Two new stable kernels have been released by Greg Kroah-Hartman: 4.14.6 and 4.9.69. As usual, they contain fixes all over the kernel tree; users of those series should upgrade. Read more See: Linux 4.14.6 and Linux 4.9.69