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Making openSUSE Multibootable USB from Ubuntu and Install It

Filed under
SUSE
Ubuntu
HowTos

Since long ago I could not make openSUSE multibootable pendrive except in single boot mode. I could not use MultiSystem nor Sundar's MultiBootUSB nor even GLIM. What's more, I could not find any easy tutorial on the net talking about making it. Fortunately, and good news for us, recently I found Aguslr's Multiboot USB (MBUSB) that is able to create it. I have tested it and as I reported few days ago I finished the installation just as perfect as other distros I had with MultiSystem. Now it's my turn to explain how I did that in 4 steps: first, create a Multiboot USB pendrive; second, copy the ISO file to USB stick; third, boot your computer to USB; and fourth, install openSUSE with it. This USB setup can accept other distros to be bootable along with openSUSE. Enjoy!

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Ubuntu 19.10 "Eoan Ermine" Enters Feature Freeze, Beta Available September 26th

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Ubuntu

Dubbed "Eoan Ermine," the Ubuntu 19.10 operating system series has been in development since end of April 2019, shortly after the release of the Ubuntu 19.04 "Disco Dingo" operating system, which is currently the latest and most advanced version of Canonical's widely-used Ubuntu Linux OS on desktop, server, and cloud.

As of August 22nd, the Ubuntu 19.10 operating system series has entered the so-called "Feature Freeze" stage of development, which means that no new features will be implemented in the upcoming release before it hits the streets later this fall on October 17th.

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Canonical/Ubuntu: Ubuntu Podcast, Ubuntu 19.10 Daily Builds with Gnome 3.34 Beta, Bashing Deb/APT/Aptitude to Promote Snaps/Snapd, Ubuntu on Ibase

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E21 – Rebelstar Raiders

    This week we?ve been using Unity and learning about code of conduct incident response. We bring you a bumper crop of news and events from the Ubuntu community plus we round up some of our favourite stories from the tech world.

    It?s Season 12 Episode 21 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Ubuntu 19.10 Daily Builds with Gnome 3.34 Beta Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Ubuntu 19.10 Daily Builds. as of 28 August, with Gnome 3.34 Beta For links and more, look here: https://www.linuxmadesimple.info/2019/08/ubuntu-1910-daily-builds.html Background Music: The Big Beat 80s by Kevin MacLeod, Syrinx Starr

  • A technical comparison between snaps and debs

    Snap installations are also different from debs. Since snaps are fully self-contained applications, during the installation, the snap package (SquashFS filesystem archive) is decompressed and mounted as a read-only loopback device, with a separate writable private area created in the user’s home directory. Because snaps contains all the elements required to run an application, their disk footprint is typically larger than an equivalent Deb package. This is partially mitigated by having snaps compressed, and in some cases they might actually have a smaller size on the disk.

    During the installation, a security profile will be created for the snap, which will determine what the snap can or cannot do once run. By default, snaps cannot access other snaps, or ever the underlying system. Specific overrides are required, which we will touch upon shortly. Furthermore, the isolated manner in which snaps are configured means that once the user removes a snap, all the assets are completely removed from the system.

    Snaps are cryptographically signed. Users can install snaps that originate outside the Snap Store by providing an explicit, manual override flag. This is common during development, allowing developers to test their snaps before uploading them to the store.

  • Compact embedded computer features Ryzen Embedded V1000

    Ibase’s compact, Ubuntu-ready “CMI300-988” embedded computer is based on its MI988 Mini-ITX board equipped with a quad-core AMD Ryzen Embedded V1807B. Highlights include up to 32GB DDR4, HDMI and DP, and 4x USB 3.1 ports.

    [...]

    The CMI300-988 runs Windows 10 or Ubuntu 18.04 with Linux Kernel 4.14.14 on AMD’s top-of-the-line V1807B model with 4x Zen cores and 8x threads clocked to 3.35/3.8GHz. The 35-54W TDP V1807B features the high-end, 11-compute-unit version of AMD’s impressive Vega GPU.

Canonical/Ubuntu: Canonical joins the ROS 2 Technical Steering Committee, Logic Supply, MAAS and Ubucon Europe 2019

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Ubuntu
  • Canonical joins the ROS 2 Technical Steering Committee

    We at Canonical care deeply about robotics. We firmly believe that robots based on Linux are cheaper to develop, more flexible, more secure, and faster to market. One of the contributing factors to this being the case is the Robot Operating System (ROS). ROS is by far the most popular middleware for creating Linux-powered robots. It provides all sorts of open source tools and libraries and pre-made components that solve common problems encountered during robot development. This allows roboticists to avoid needing to reinvent the wheel and instead focus on what really makes their robot unique. Of course, another reason we care about ROS is that most of the ROS community use Ubuntu. We love our users, and we want to make sure the experience they have on Ubuntu is consistently stellar!

    We also care deeply about security, and that permeates everything we do. We’ve all seen how the IoT wave has been going in this regard: badly. IoT devices are low-margin, and no one has any incentive to keep them up to date or ensure that they’re secure in the first place. Manufacturers want to drive costs down, and users don’t consider the devices computers and don’t give a second thought to connecting them to the internet. It’s an unfortunate set of circumstances.

    We think that the best way out of this situation is to make security and maintenance so easy that it becomes the obvious choice. If it was suddenly easier and cheaper for device manufacturers to create secure devices that can be automatically updated, why wouldn’t they do it? That’s the premise behind snaps and Ubuntu Core: by making complex topics like security and updates transparent and straightforward, we can make the entire ecosystem better for everyone.

  • Rough, tough Coffee Lake industrial PC offers Ubuntu BSP

    Logic Supply’s rugged “Karbon 700” industrial PC runs Ubuntu or Windows on Intel Coffee Lake chips with 3x DP, 6x USB 3.0, 2x mini-PCIe, 3x M.2, 3x GbE, and optional 2x SATA and dual PCIe.

    We typically associate Logic Supply with mini-PCs, but the company also offers more feature-rich industrial computers such as its Intel Kaby Lake based MC850-50. Now the company has launched a more advanced system with its ruggedized, Coffee Lake based Karbon 700. The system supports challenging environments for data loggers NVRs, or edge devices “in heavy industrial, in-vehicle or remote installations in the manufacturing, physical security and energy management industries,” says Logic Supply. The rugged system offers a number of automotive-focused features.

  • Multi-tenancy in MAAS

    In this blog post, we are going to introduce the concept of multi-tenancy in MAAS. This allows operators to have different groups of users own a group of resources (machines) without ever even knowing about other groups of users enabling enhanced machine utilisation.

    A common use case for medium and large-scale environments is to provide a different set of machines for different users or groups of users. MAAS has historically approached this by allowing users to pre-reserve machines (allocate) for later use. However, as of MAAS 2.4 we introduced the concept of resource pools.

  • Ubucon Europe 2019: Our first gold sponsor – ANSOL!

    Our first gold sponsor of this event is ANSOL (Associação Nacional para o Software Livre), the Portuguese national association for free and open source software.

    [...]

    Thanks to them, we have received significant support to sustain our event and our journey to give you one of the best open source experiences in Sintra.

Debian and Ubuntu/Canonical Leftovers

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Molly de Blanc: Free software activities (July 2019)

    Debian AH rebranded to the Debian Community Team (CT) after our sprint back in June. We had meetings, both following up on things that happened at the meeting and covering typical business. We created a draft of a new team mission statement, which was premiered, so to speak, at DebConf19.

  • Mike Gabriel: Debian goes libjpeg-turbo 2.0.x [RFH]

    I recently uploaded libjpeg-turbo 2.0.2-1~exp1 to Debian experimental. This has been the first upload of the 2.0.x release series of libjpeg-turbo.

    After 3 further upload iterations (~exp4 that is), the package now builds on nearly all (except 3) architectures supported by Debian.

    @all: Please Test

    For those architectures that libjpeg-turbo 2.0.2-1~exp* is already available in Debian experimental, please start testing your applications on Debian testing/unstable systems with libjpeg-turbo 2.0.2-1~exp* installed from experimental. If you observe any peculiarities, please file bugs against src:libjpeg-turbo on Debian BTS. Thanks!

    Please note: the major 2.x release series does not introduce an SOVERSION bump, so applications don't have to be rebuilt against the newer libjpeg-turbo. Simply drop-in-replace installed libjpeg62-turbo bin:pkg by the version from Debian experimental.

  • Kubernetes 1.16 beta now available, with support from Canonical

    Canonical announces full enterprise support for Kubernetes 1.16, starting with the beta release, with support covering the following installation mechanisms – kubeadm, Charmed Kubernetes, and MicroK8s.

    The beta release of Kubernetes offers users an opportunity to test some of the upcoming features and to validate containerised workloads on the latest Kubernetes technology. It also offers the user community a chance to give early feedback on the next release, ensuring new features work as intended, and the existing features you rely upon haven’t regressed.

    For quick, secure, and reliable Kubernetes installations in a single step, the MicroK8s beta channel will be updated with Kubernetes 1.16 beta. In addition to supporting the beta, the MicroK8s community has recently added one line installs of Helm and Cilium. With MicroK8s 1.16 beta you can develop and deploy Kubernetes 1.16 on any Linux desktop, server or VM across 42 Linux distros. Mac and Windows are supported with Multipass.

  • MicroK8s Version 1.16.0 Beta Released!

    We’re excited to announce the release of MicroK8s 1.16 beta! MicroK8s is a lightweight and reliable Kubernetes cluster delivered as a single snap package – it can be installed on any Linux distribution which supports snaps or Windows and Mac using Multipass. MicroK8s is small and simple to install and is a great way to stand up a cluster quickly for development and testing. Try it on your laptop!

  • A guide to developing Android apps on Ubuntu

    Android is the most popular mobile operating system and is continuing to grow its market share. IDC expects that Android will have 85.5% of the market by 2022, demonstrating that app development on Android will continue to be an in-demand skill.

    For developers looking to build Android apps, Ubuntu is the ideal platform in conjunction with Android Studio – the official Android development environment. Ubuntu features a wide variety of software development tools including numerous programming language compilers, integrated development environments (IDEs) and toolchains to enable developers to target multiple hardware platforms.

  • The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 593
  • Snaps help Xibo rekindle its relationship with Linux

    Sometimes, relationships just don’t work out. At first, it seemed that Xibo and Linux were made for each other. Xibo had a popular open source digital signage and player system, while Linux brought a community of enthusiastic users. Dan Garner of Xibo remembers why they broke up in 2015: “Releasing our player on Linux was too heavy on development resources, we were a small team, and it was difficult to make deployment stable”.

    So, Linux releases were shelved, much to the disappointment of users. Xibo’s software remained available as open source and as binaries. However, Linux users had to do the heavy lifting to install it and make it work. Hardcore fans often built their Xibo systems directly from the source code, creating a patchwork of different generations of the software in a universe outside Xibo’s mainstream activities.

  • Connect to Wi-Fi From Terminal on Ubuntu 18.04/19.04 with WPA Supplicant

    In this tutorial, we are going to learn how to connect to Wi-Fi network from command line on Ubuntu 18.04/19.04 server and desktop using wpa_supplicant. In a modern home wireless network, communications are protected with WPA-PSK (pre-shared key) as opposed to WPA-Enterprise, which is designed for enterprise networks. WPA-PSK is also known as WPA-Personal. wpa_supplicant is an implementation of the WPA supplicant component. A supplicant in wireless LAN is a client software installed on end-user’s computer that needs to be authenticated in order to join a network.

RaspEX Project Brings Ubuntu 19.10 "Eoan Ermine" with LXDE to the Raspberry Pi 4

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Ubuntu

While Ubuntu 19.10 "Eoan Ermine" is not out yet, RaspEX Build 190807 is here based on it and designed to run on the latest Raspberry Pi 4 single-board computer, which comes with impressive hardware, including a Quad-Core 1.5GHz 64-bit ARM Cortex-A72 CPU, up to 4GB RAM, as well as on-board dual-band 802.11 b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 5.0 (BLE).

Apart from being based on the upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 "Eoan Ermine" operating system, due for release on October 17th, the new RaspEX release also includes packages from the recently released Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system series and the open-source Linaro software for ARM SoCs, and it's powered by the Linux 4.19.63 kernel.

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Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS Makes It Easier to Patch the Linux Kernel without Rebooting

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Powered by the Linux 5.0 kernel series from Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo), Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS is the third maintenance updates to the long-term supported Ubuntu 18.04 LTS operating system series, which is supported by Canonical with security and software updates for at least five years, until 2023.

Apart from the updated kernel and graphics stacks, the Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS release also introduces enhanced Livepatch desktop integration to make it easier for users of the GNOME desktop environment to patch the Linux kernel without rebooting their systems.

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Allwinner-based Pico-ITX SBCs launch on Kickstarter

Filed under
Android
Linux
Ubuntu

ActPower Taiwan has gone to Kickstarter to launch three “Project-X-A1” Pico-ITX boards starting at $44 that run Linux on Allwinner H2+, H3, and H5 SoCs and support Raspberry Pi HATs and homegrown expansion modules.

Embedded technology vendor ActPower Taiwan has launched a Project-X project for small-volume manufacturers and individual buyers, starting with three Pico-ITX form-factor Project-X-AI boards with Allwinner SoCs. ActPower is launching the SBCs on Kickstarter with shipments due in November if it meets the modest $4,818 funding goal by Sep. 30.

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Ubuntu & Debian Moving Along With Plans For Removing Python 2 Packages

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu

With Debian 10 "Buster" out the door and Python 2 hitting end-of-life at the end of the year, Debian is working on their process of removing Python 2 packages that don't get ported to Python 3 and Ubuntu is working on similar action for their Python 2 packages not found in upstream Debian.

Debian 10 will continue offering Python 2 support but looking ahead to Debian 11 "Bullseye" and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS is where each distribution is looking to respectively do away with their older support and just focus on Python 3. With just a little more than five months to go until Python 2 will officially be retired, they are working on transitioning capable packages over to using Python 3 where able and for unmaintained code comes down to removing them when there are no reverse dependencies.

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Finally, I Can Make Multiboot USB of openSUSE from Ubuntu

Filed under
SUSE
Ubuntu
HowTos

As you may know, my multiboot making tools were MultiSystem (since 2015), then Sundar's MultiBootUSB (2018), and recently GLIM (2019), but they all cannot work for openSUSE. Thanks to Aguslr, his program Multiboot USB (not to be confused with MultiBootUSB above) solved this problem for me! This means up to today I never managed to make openSUSE multiboot in a USB while I always managed to make other GNU/Linux distros work successfully such as Ubuntu family, Mint, Trisquel, Debian Regular, Elementary, even Fedora. In this article, I just report my success in making openSUSE Leap 15.1 multibootable USB and then installing it on a laptop. However, this article is just my report and I planned to publish tutorial on this Aguslr's Multiboot USB as soon as possible. Anyway, go ahead and happy working!

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Linux Foundation Hosting Open Source Project on UAS Interoperability

    The Linux Foundation, a nonprofit technology consortium, plans to host the InterUSS Platform Open Source Project, which is designed to enable “trusted, secure and scalable” interoperability among unmanned aircraft system (UAS) service suppliers (USSs) to advance “safe, equitable and efficient” drone operations, the foundation has announced. Initial contributors include both industry and regulatory organizations: Wing, AirMap, Uber and the Swiss Federal Office of Civil Aviation. Similar to the evolution of cities, our skies are becoming busier with traffic, the Linux Foundation explains. In an effort to unleash innovation and ensure safety, aviation regulators around the world are implementing UAS traffic management to support increasing and diverse drone operations. Under UTM, a set of USSs (also known as U-Space Service Providers, or USPs) assists drone operators with conducting safe and compliant operations.

  • #CFSummit2019: Open Source Community Witnesses High-Velocity Of Change

    This time last week, The Hague, The Netherlands welcomed over 700 people all attending the 2019 European Cloud Foundry Summit. While last year, the theme was very much tailored around pushing enterprise-ready platform-as-a-service portfolio, as it continues to strike closer relationships with the world’s biggest cloud service providers, but this year, the summit took a more forward-thinking approach with its ‘Building the Future’ theme.

  • CEDIA 2019: Home Assistant Is an Open-Source Home Automation Platform, Uses Raspberry Pi
  • Homura Is A Windows Game Launcher For FreeBSD - Supports Steam, Origin, UPlay + More

    While FreeBSD doesn't see much in the way of game ports besides compatibility with open-source games/engines, FreeBSD's Linux binary compatibility layer for years has allowed running Linux games on FreeBSD and there is also Wine support for FreeBSD to handle Windows software. Thanks to those efforts, it's possible to make a FreeBSD gaming box. Homura is a newer open-source project focused on providing a Windows game launcher for FreeBSD systems. Homura is akin to CrossOver or Lutris and wraps around Wine/WineTricks and makes it easy to deploy various Windows games and gaming services under FreeBSD.

  • The Hardware FOSDEM Uses To Carry Out Linux Video Recordings Of Their Event

    Not only is FOSDEM one of the best open-source/Linux events in the world for those who make the journey each February to Brussels, but they also for years now have done a masterful job at recording the different talks and developer room sessions. Each year gets better both for the event itself as well as the video recordings even with FOSDEM operating on a very limited budget due to the event being free to attend. For those curious about the hardware/software setup powering their video setup, here's an interesting blog post.

  • Matplotlib titles have configurable locations – and you can have more than one at once!

    Just a quick post here to let you know about a matplotlib feature I've only just found out about.

  • Microsoft Operating Systems BlueKeep Vulnerability

    BlueKeep (CVE-2019-0708) exists within the Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) used by the Microsoft Windows OSs listed above. An attacker can exploit this vulnerability to perform remote code execution on an unprotected system. According to Microsoft, an attacker can send specially crafted packets to one of these operating systems that has RDP enabled.[1] After successfully sending the packets, the attacker would have the ability to perform a number of actions: adding accounts with full user rights; viewing, changing, or deleting data; or installing programs. This exploit, which requires no user interaction, must occur before authentication to be successful.

Software: Accounting, TrueCrypt Alternatives and Shotcut 19.09.14

  • 5 Popular Free and Open Source Accounting Software
  • 5 Best TrueCrypt Alternatives - Open source encryption apps

    If you want to protect your data from prying eyes, then you need to encrypt it. Previously many of us relied on Truecrypt to do this, however, as the popular encryption app was mysteriously discontinued, we have created this article to give you five alternatives to TrueCrypt. If you are serious about security, then you will do this yourself rather than using a third-party to do it for you. This is what is meant by end-to-end encryption (e2ee). But even if you are using e2ee, how do you know that the software is not doing something untoward? Such as secretly sending your encryption keys back to its developers, or creating a backdoor in the encryption. The only guarantee we can have against this is the use of open-source code. Only if a program can be freely examined to ensure it does what it is supposed to (and only what it is supposed to) can we place a reasonable amount of confidence in it.

  • Shotcut 19.09.14

    Shotcut is a free, open source, cross-platform video editor for Windows, Mac and Linux. Major features include support for a wide range of formats; no import required meaning native timeline editing; Blackmagic Design support for input and preview monitoring; and resolution support to 4k.

KMyMoney 5.0.7 released

The KMyMoney development team today announces the immediate availability of version 5.0.7 of its open source Personal Finance Manager. This release becomes necessary due to the new regulations of the PSD2 which affects the online banking availability for German users. To make KMyMoney compatible with them, especially the Strong Customer Authentication part, KMyMoney had to be adapted to updated APIs of the Gwenhywfar and AqBanking libraries which provide the banking protocol implementations. KMyMoney now requires a Gwenhywfar minimum version of 4.99.16 and an AqBanking version of 5.99.32. Read more Also in KDE right now: Roman Gilg: Political activism in KDE [Ed: Gilg is wrong. Climate change is science. It is not politics. AstroTurfing by oil giants tried for decades to warp it into a partisan 'political identity issue'.]

Lennart Talks Up systemd's SD-Boot + Boot Loader Specification

In addition to announcing systemd-homed for better user home directories, Lennart Poettering also used this year's All Systems Go conference to drum up support for systemd's boot efforts around SD-Boot and the Boot Loader Specification. systemd-boot/sd-boot is systemd's UEFI boot manager formerly known as Gummiboot. SD-Boot continues picking up new functionality and at least optional usage by more distributions. The Systemd Boot Loader Specification (also known as the FreeDesktop.org Boot Loader Specification) meanwhile is trying to assist use-cases around dual/multi-boot operating system setups and related use-cases with drop-in file handling, standardized configuration files and the like. Read more