Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ubuntu

A Look at What's Next for Ubuntu Linux in 2017

Filed under
Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth's company Canonical has been developing Ubuntu Linux for over a decade, with two new major milestone releases debuting every year. In 2017, the first release will be Ubuntu 17.04, codenamed the 'Zesty Zapus' set to debut in April. The big question that Ubuntu Linux fans have though is what the Ubuntu 17.10 release will be called, when it is released in October.

Read more

Canonical Releases Snapd 2.22 Snappy Daemon for Ubuntu 14.04, 16.04 and 16.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

Today, January 30, 2017, Canonical, through Michael Vogt, had the pleasure of announcing the availability of the snapd 2.22 Snappy daemon for Ubuntu Linux.

Read more

Leftovers: Debian and Ubuntu

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Decopy - Yet another debian/copyright helper

    As every responsible maintainer should know, having an updated debian/copyright file is very important but can also take a significant amount of work. A lot of copy & pasting, a lot of manual corrections, and a lot of opportunity for human errors.

  • Call for Testing: Stretch Cloud Images on AWS

    Following up on Steve McIntyre’s writeup of the Debian Cloud Sprint that took place in Seattle this past November, I’m pleased to announce the availability of preliminary Debian stretch AMIs for Amazon EC2. Pre-generated images are available in all public AWS regions, or you can use FAI with the fai-cloud-images configuration tree to generate your own images.

  • Different strokes

    America was founded by immigrants. Everybody knows the story about American Indians, the originals of the land were over-powered by the European settlers. So any claim, then and now that immigration did not help United States is just a lie.

    [...]

    One important decision that would be taken today is where people would stay during debconf.

  • Ubuntu Touch OTA-15 Hotfix Update Could Land Soon for Ubuntu Phones and Tablets

    We've been informed recently by one of our readers about the fact that Canonical's engineers are planning to release a new OTA (Over-the-Air) update for Ubuntu Phones and Tablets, dubbed OTA-15.

    That's good news for those who purchased an Ubuntu-powered device recently because Canonical still has time to fix some bugs here and there, and maybe add a few new features to the Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system, which is currently in the transition to the current LTS (Long Term Support) version of Ubuntu Linux.

  • KDE Applications Begin Appearing In The Ubuntu Snap Store

    Some KDE developers are embracing Ubuntu's Snap packaging technology and are beginning to offer KDE Applications via the Ubuntu Snap Store.

  • Zesty Zapus Alpha 2 Released
  • We're looking for Ubuntu 17.04 wallpapers right now!

    Ubuntu is a testament to the power of sharing, and we use the default selection of desktop wallpapers in each release as a way to celebrate the larger Free Culture movement. Talented artists across the globe create media and release it under licenses that don't simply allow, but cheerfully encourage sharing and adaptation. This cycle's Free Culture Showcase for Ubuntu 17.04 is now underway!

  • Ubuntu 17.04 Wallpaper Contest Begins, Submit Your Astonishing Artwork Right Now

    Ubuntu member Nathan Haines is informing Softpedia about a new installation of the Free Culture Showcase movement, this time for the upcoming Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system.

    Yes, you're reading it right, a new Ubuntu 17.04 wallpaper contest is upon us, and it's time to go out and take the best photographs for inclusion in the next major release of one of the world's most popular free operating systems, Ubuntu Linux.

  • Ubuntu 17.04 “Zesty Zapus” Alpha 2 Released, ISO And Torrent Files Available

    Canonical has released the second and only Alpha for Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus. The testing snapshots are available for download for Lubuntu, Kubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Kylin, Ubuntu GNOME, and Ubuntu Budgie. Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus Alpha 2 images are based on Linux kernel 4.9. The final version of Ubuntu 17.04 will ship on April 13, 2017.

Leftovers: Debian, Ubuntu and Derivatives

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian at FOSDEM 2017

    On February 4th and 5th, Debian will be attending FOSDEM 2017 in Brussels, Belgium; a yearly gratis event (no registration needed) run by volunteers from the Open Source and Free Software community. It's free, and it's big: more than 600 speakers, over 600 events, in 29 rooms.

  • Am I a target now?

    While reading the Tails 2.10 changelog I stumbled upon the fact that Tails now supports exFAT. Since Tails is Debian based I just checked the image and indeed it contains the fuse-exfat package. Do I've to assume that I've now another set of crosshairs on my back just because it's one possible maintainer you could attack to place malicious code into Tails?

  • Ubuntu 17.04 Alpha 2 Released, Available to Download Now
  • Bodhi Linux 4.1.0 Ubuntu-based distro now available with updated kernel and new theme

    There are so many Linux distributions nowadays, that it can be hard to be excited by them. Linux Mint, for example, releases too many versions of its operating system; news of an update can become rather ho-hum. Major Linux distributions, such as Ubuntu and Fedora, remain exciting, however.

    Some smaller Linux-based operating systems are still worthy of attention, however, and one such distro is Bodhi. Based on Ubuntu, the lightweight OS is very unique thanks to the Moksha desktop environment. Because of its familiarity, that DE makes Bodhi a smart choice for Windows users looking to switch to Linux. Today, Bodhi reaches version 4.1.0.

    "Today I am happy to announce the first scheduled update release of the Bodhi Linux 4 branch -- Bodhi Linux 4.1.0. This release serves to package up the fixes for a few bugs that slipped through the cracks in the 4.0.0 release, as well as provided updated package sets for the install ISO images. Most notably these ISO images come with EFL 1.18.4, Linux Kernel 4.8, and a new Moksha Theme based on the 'Arc Dark' theme. Existing Bodhi 4.0.0 users already have the bug fixes incorporated into these ISO images, but they will need to manually install the newer kernel and theme if they wish to utilize them," says Jeff Hoogland, Bodhi Linux.

  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” Xfce And KDE Editions Available For Download

    The Linux Mint project has released Xfce and KDE version of its Linux Mint 18.1 operating system. Shipping with Xfce 4.12 and KDE Plasma 5.8.5 LTS desktop environments, these releases are based on Linux kernel 4.4 and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. The users can download the 32-bit and 64-bit images of these versions via Linux Mint’s website.

Ubuntu 17.04 Opt-In Flavors Finally Get Their Alpha Release, Here's What's New

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical today released the second Alpha of the upcoming Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system, which, in fact, is the first Alpha of the new series.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu 17.04 Spins Do Their Lone Alpha Release

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Install The New Dekko Email App on Ubuntu Desktop

    To install the Dekko Snap on your Ubuntu (Unity 7) desktop you need… Nope, you don’t need anything; you’ve got everything you need already.

  • The Old Dekko App Will Get ‘No Further Updates’

    The current Dekko email app for Ubuntu phone is no longer supported, and no further updates will be released. Work is to continue on a Snap-based version.

  • New Linux Mint Debian Edition 2 "Betsy" ISOs Released After Almost Two Years

    Linux Mint project leader Clement Lefebvre today announced the availability of new ISO images for those who want to install the Debian-based LMDE (Linux Mint Debian Edition) 2 "Betsy" operating system.

    Linux Mint Debian Edition 2 "Betsy" is the rolling flavor of the popular Linux Mint distribution, but using Debian GNU/Linux packages instead of Ubuntu's. It was first introduced to the world almost two years ago, in April 2015, as a computer OS targeted at experienced users.

    Because it follows a rolling release model, LMDE 2 offered its users all the latest package versions from the upstream Debian Jessie repositories, but the install mediums were outdated if you wanted to reinstall the OS or deploy it on new PCs, requiring you to download a large number of updates.

Canonical Announces LXD 2.8 Pure-Container Hypervisor for Ubuntu 16.04 and 14.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical today announced the availability of the LXD 2.8 pure-container hypervisor designed from the ground up to let users run unmodified Linux-based operating systems and apps with virtual machine-style operations faster than anything else on the market.

Read more

More Linux on my new notebook: Fedora, Linux Mint and Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat
Ubuntu

Three more Linux distributions installed on this notebook, and one failure. I should have anticipated the problem with Mint Debian because of the previous experience with Debian jessie, so I suppose that doesn't count as much of a surprise. Everything else went pretty much as expected, though. As I said after installing the first three distributions on this notebook, it is very pleasant to use, and really amazingly good for the price that I paid.

Read more

Canonical Brings Kubernetes 1.5.2 Container Orchestration to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical, through Jorge O. Castro, is proud to announce the general availability of the latest Kubernetes stable release in the company's specifically crafted software repositories for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus).

Read more

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Stretch preparations before the freeze

    These are the last hours when we can update packages and they migrate to testing after 10 days right before the full freeze on 5 February.

    The latest Wireshark upstream version, 2.2.4 has been released on Monday and it is waiting patiently to be part of next Debian stable.

  • Worried about your online privacy? Download Linux distro Tails 2.10

    Donald Trump is US president now, and maybe you are happy about that. More power to you. Some folks, however, are terrified of the man. True, he only just started the job, but he has already declared war on the truth by lying about both inaugural crowd size and voter fraud. He has even publicly attacked the press for doing its job. Heck, Trump's FCC appointee, Ajit Pai, is a known opponent of net neutrality. With all of that said, it can be hard to feel that your privacy will be safe with such a curious administration.

  • Ebook: Beginner's Guide to Ubuntu Package Management
  • Ubuntu 17.04 Continues Prepping For Linux 4.10

    Ubuntu 17.04, the Zesty Zapus, is still planning to ship Linux 4.10 for its kernel when the OS ships in April.

    Linux 4.9 is still in the Zesty repository for now, but via the kernel team's unstable repository they are tracking upstream and have re-based to Linux 4.10-rc5.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

New GNU/Linux Releases: TheSSS, Arkas OS, Black Lab, and Parrot

  • The Smallest Server Suite Gets Special Edition with PHP 7.0.15, Apache 2.4.25
    4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki informs Softpedia about the availability of a special edition of the TheSSS (The Smallest Server Suite) Live Linux operating system. Carrying the same version number as the original TheSSS release, namely 21.0, and dubbed TheSSS7, the new flavor ships with more recent PHP packages from the 7.0.x series. Specifically, TheSSS7 includes PHP 7.0.15, while TheSSS comes with PHP 5.6.30.
  • Descent OS Is Dead, Arkas OS Takes Its Place and It's Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
    Some of you out there might remember the Descent OS distro created by Brian Manderville and based on the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system, and today we have some bad news for them as the development is now officially closed. Descent OS first appeared in February 2012 as a lightweight Ubuntu derivative built around the GNOME 2 desktop environment. Back then, it was known as Descent|OS, and was quite actively developed with new features and components borrowed from the latest Ubuntu releases.
  • Black Lab Linux 8.1 Out Now with LibreOffice 5.3, It's Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
    Softpedia was informed today by the Black Lab Software project about the general availability of the first point release to the Black Lab Linux 8.0 operating system series. Serving as a base release to the company's enterprise offerings and equipped with all the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel from the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, Black Lab Linux 8.1 comes with up-to-date components and the latest security patches ported from Ubuntu's repositories as of February 15, 2017. "Today we are pleased to announce the release of Black Lab Linux 8.1. Our first incremental release to the 8.0 series. In this release we have brought all security updates up to Feb 15, 2017, as well as application updates," said Roberto J. Dohnert, CEO of Black Lab Software.
  • Parrot 3.5 – Call For Betatesters
    We did our best to prepare these preview images including all the updates and the new features introduced since the last release, but now we need your help to understand how to make it even better, and of course we need your help to understand if there is something that doesn’t work as expected or something that absolutely needs to be included in the final release.

Linux and Graphics

  • Linux Kernel 4.10 Now Available for Linux Lite Users, Here's How to Install It
    Minutes after the release of Linux kernel 4.10 last evening, Jerry Bezencon from the Linux Lite project announced that users of the Ubuntu-based distribution can now install it on their machines. Linux 4.10 is now the most advanced kernel branch for all Linux-based operating systems, and brings many exciting new features like virtual GPU support, better writeback management, eBPF hooks for cgroups, as well as Intel Cache Allocation Technology support for the L2/L3 caches of Intel processors.
  • Wacom's Intuos Pro To Be Supported By The Linux 4.11 Kernel
    Jiri Kosina submitted the HID updates today for the Linux 4.11 kernel cycle.
  • Mesa 13.0.5 Released for Linux Gamers with over 70 Improvements, Bug Fixes
    We reported the other day that Mesa 13.0.5 3D Graphics Library will be released this week, and it looks like Collabora's Emil Velikov announced it earlier this morning for all Linux gamers. Mesa 13.0.5 is a maintenance update to the Mesa 13.0 stable series of the open source graphics stack used by default in numerous, if not all GNU/Linux distributions, providing gamers with powerful drivers for their AMD Radeon, Nvidia, and Intel GPUs. It comes approximately three weeks after the Mesa 13.0.4 update.
  • mesa 13.0.5

Interview: Thomas Weissel Installing Plasma in Austrian Schools

With Plasma 5 having reached maturity for widespread use we are starting to see rollouts of it in large environments. Dot News interviewed the admin behind one such rollout in Austrian schools. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Top Lightweight Linux Distributions To Try In 2017
    Today I am going to discuss the top lightweight Linux distros you can try this year on your computer. Although you got yourself a prettyLinuxle linux already but there is always something new to try in Linux. Remember I recommend to try this distros in virtualbox firstly or with the live boot before messing with your system. All distro that I will mention here will be new and somewhat differ from regular distros.
  • [ANNOUNCE] linux-4.10-ck1 / MuQSS CPU scheduler 0.152
  • MSAA Compression Support For Intel's ANV Vulkan Driver
    Intel developer Jason Ekstrand posted a patch over the weekend for enabling MSAA compression support within the ANV Vulkan driver.
  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 31
    As we announced in the previous report, our 31th Scrum sprint was slightly shorter than the usual ones. But you would never say so looking to this blog post. We have a lot of things to talk you about!
  • Comparing Mobile Subscriber Data Across Different Sources - How accurate is the TomiAhonen Almanac every year?
    You’ll see that last spring I felt the world had 7.6 Billion total mobile subscriptions when machine-to-machine (M2M) connections are included. I felt the world had 7.2 Billion total subscriptions when excluding M2M and just counting those in use by humans. And the most relevant number (bottom line) is the ‘unique’ mobile users, which I felt was an even 5.0 Billion humans in 2015. The chart also has the total handsets-in-use statistic which I felt was 5.6 Billion at the end of 2015. Note that I was literally the first person to report on the distinction of the unique user count vs total subscriptions and I have been urging, nearly begging for the big industry giants to also measure that number. They are slowly joining in that count. Similarly to M2M, we also are now starting to see others report M2M counts. I have yet to see a major mobile statistical provider give a global count of devices in use. That will hopefully come also, soon. But lets examine these three numbers that we now do have other sources, a year later, to see did I know what I was doing.