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Ubuntu

Should You Use Linux Mint's Debian or Standard Edition?

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GNU
Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

At first, users might wonder why Linux Mint offers both its Ubuntu-based Linux Mint Standard Edition and the Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE). Since Debian, Linux Mint, and Ubuntu all derive from the Debian repositories, isn't the family resemblance too close to bother?

To the casual user, the choice may appear to be no more than the result of Linux Mint trying to accommodate as many users as possible. However, depending on your needs and preferences, you may find that one edition suits your needs more than the other.

In general, the two editions have much in common. Both the Debian and the standard editions are available in 32- and 64-bit downloads that default to the Cinnamon or Mate desktops. Both use the same installer, and both open for the first time on desktops with similar wallpapers and tools. Both, too, can add other desktop environments from the Mint repositories that they both share. According to Linux Mint, LMDE is faster than the standard edition, but in practice the difference is slight enough that many users probably never notice.

However, look closer, and the differences start to appear -- although these difference have changed over the years. For example, it is no longer true that the LMDE is a rolling release -- one that adds new packages as they become available, rather than waiting for a general release -- although LMDE 1 was.

Also, contrary to a widely circulating story, LMDE 2 is fully capable of using Ubuntu PPA repositories for packages in development. The PPAs simply have to be added as a package source in /etc/apt/. Alternatively, their packages can be downloaded and installed using the dpkg command. Since Debian and Ubuntu have been different distros for well over a decade now, you may find that some packages from PPAs are not compatible with Debian, but these cases are relatively rare, particularly if you stick to productivity applications rather than core system components.

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Beavering away at the brilliantly bionic 18.04 LTS

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Ubuntu

Congratulations to Team *Buntu on the release of our Artful Aardvark 17.10, featuring all your favourite desktop environments, kubernetes 1.8, the latest OpenStack, and security updates for 9 months, which takes us all the way to our next enterprise release, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

A brumous development cycle always makes for cool-headed work and brisk progress on the back of breem debate.

As always, 18.04 LTS will represent the sum of all our interests.

For those of you with bimodal inclinations, there’s the official upstream Kubernetes-on-Ubuntu spell for ‘conjure-up kubernetes’ with bijou multi-cloud goodness. We also have spells for OpenStack on Ubuntu and Hadoop on Ubuntu, so conjure-up is your one-stop magic shop for at-scale boffo big data, cloud and containers. Working with upstreams to enable fast deployment and operations of their stuff on all the clouds is a beamish way to spend the day.

If your thing is bling, pick a desktop! We’ve defaulted to GNOME, but we’re the space where KDE and GNOME and MATE and many others come together to give users real and easy choice of desktops. And if you’re feeling boned by the lack of Unity in open source, you might want to hop onto the channel and join those who are updating Unity7 for the newest X and kernel graphics in 18.04.

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Also: Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Dubbed as the "Bionic Beaver," Launches April 26, 2018

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Is The "Bionic Beaver"

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Is Named ‘Bionic Beaver’

Ubuntu Kylin 17.10 and Recommended Applications for Ubuntu 17.10

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Kylin 17.10 Releases for Chinese Linux Users with Own Video Player, More

    The Ubuntu Kylin team was pleased to announce the release of Ubuntu Kylin 17.10 for Chinese Linux users as part of the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system.

    Coming with the same internals of Ubuntu 17.10, the Ubuntu Kylin 17.10 release adds improvements to the desktop environment and featured applications. It's powered by the latest Linux 4.13 kernel, which features asynchronous I/O improvements, SMB 3.0 as default protocol for CIFS mounts, and several EXT4 enhancements.

    Its MATE-based UKUI desktop environment received a brand-new icon theme, Start Menu optimizations, adjustments to the lockscreen setting page and control panel layout, as well as various improvements to the file manager, including new "Unzip" and "Open by Terminal" functions in the right-click context menu.

  • Recommended Applications for Ubuntu 17.10

    Here I list useful free software applications for Ubuntu 17.10 users. This including lightweight web browsers, video player, and also alternatives to Adobe Photoshop, CorelDRAW, or such nonfree software applications. You also can read how to install them here. I hope this list will help you in your first days using Artful Aardvark!

What Will the Ubuntu 18.04 Name ‘B’?

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Ubuntu

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • APT 1.6 alpha 1 – seccomp and more

    I just uploaded APT 1.6 alpha 1, introducing a very scary thing: Seccomp sandboxing for methods, the programs downloading files from the internet and decompressing or compressing stuff. With seccomp I reduced the number of system calls these methods can use to 149 from 430. Specifically we excluded most ways of IPC, xattrs, and most importantly, the ability for methods to clone(2), fork(2), or execve(2) (or execveat(2)). Yes, that’s right – methods can no longer execute programs.

  • Debian Policy call for participation -- October 2017

    Here’s are some of the bugs against the Debian Policy Manual. In particular, there really are quite a few patches needing seconds from DDs.

  • Free Software Efforts (2017W42)

    Here’s my weekly report for week 42 of 2017. In this week I have replaced my spacebar, failed to replace a HDD and begun the process to replace my YubiKey.

  • Winners of the Ubuntu 17.10 Free Culture Showcase

    Every new Ubuntu cycle brings many changes, and the arrival of Ubuntu 17.10, the “Artful Aardvark” release, brings more changes than usual. The default desktop has changed to GNOME Shell, with some very thoughtful changes by the desktop team to make it more familiar. And of course, the community wallpapers included with this exciting new release have changed as well!

    Every cycle, talented artists around the world create media and release it under licenses that encourage sharing and adaptation. For Ubuntu 17.10, 50 images were submitted to the Ubuntu 17.10 Free Culture Showcase photo pool on Flickr, where all eligible submissions can be found.

System76 Unveils First Release of Pop!_OS Linux Distro, Based on Ubuntu 17.10

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OS
Linux
Ubuntu

System76, the maker of Linux-based computers, is proud to announce the first-ever release of Pop!_OS Linux, its own GNU/Linux distribution based on Canonical's Ubuntu OS.

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Lubuntu Next 17.10 Rolls Out to Early Adopters with LXQt 0.11.1 Desktop

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Ubuntu

Lubuntu team announced the release and immediate availability for download of Lubuntu 17.10 and Lubuntu Next 17.10 distributions as part of the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system.

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Also: Ubuntu Kylin 17.10 Releases for Chinese Linux Users with Own Video Player, More

A look at Ubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark

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Reviews
Ubuntu

I’m going to preface this review, and say that I liked Ubuntu 17.10 after using it for a few days. However, there were multiple issues with it, that ultimately ruined my experience; however, your mileage my vary.

Ubuntu 17.10, code-named Artful Aardvark, is the latest Ubuntu Linux release from Canonical, and was released Oct. 19.

It’s the first desktop release of the pure Ubuntu flavor, to not feature the Unity desktop, since Ubuntu 11.04. Now, Ubuntu uses the GNOME desktop environment now.

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Also:

Ubuntu: Mir running on Fedora and Ubuntu 17.10 Guidance

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Ubuntu
  • Mir running on Fedora

    Last week we released Mir 0.28 and this week we settled down to tidy up a few bugs fixes and feature requests that didn’t make the release. I’ve started collecting these for a Mir 0.28.1 release to come in the next few weeks.

    The most interesting of these comes from conversations at the Ubuntu Rally: there were several requests from community members around getting Mir working (or even building!) on other distributions.

  • Ubuntu Developer Gets Mir Running On Fedora

    Lead Mir developer Alan Griffiths has spent the time getting the Mir display server running on Fedora. This is part of a broader feature request of getting Mir running on more Linux distributions than just Ubuntu.

    The changes to get Mir running on at least Fedora should be merged for the upcoming Mir 0.28.1 point release. Mir 0.28.1 will also incorporate other bug fixes.

  • How To Remove the Unity Desktop from Ubuntu 17.10
  • 9 Things to do After Installing Ubuntu 17.10
  • How To Install Ubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark

Ubuntu: GNOME, New Video, Ubuntu Podcast, Refreshing the Xubuntu Logo

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 17.10: We're coming GNOME! Plenty that's Artful in Aardvark, with a few Wayland wails

    Ubuntu has done a good job of integrating a few plugins that improve GNOME's user experience compared to stock GNOME – most notably a modified version of the Dash-to-Dock and the App Indicator extensions, which go a long way toward making GNOME a bit more like Unity. It's worth noting that Ubuntu's fork of Dash-to-Dock lacks some features of the original, but you can uninstall the Ubuntu version in favour of the original if you prefer. In fact you can really revert to a pretty stock GNOME desktop with just a few tweaks. Canonical said it wasn't going to heavily modify GNOME and indeed it hasn't.

  • What’s New in Ubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark
  • Ubuntu Podcast: S10E33 – Aggressive Judicious Frame

    This week we’ve been protecting our privacy with LineageOS and playing Rust. Telegram get fined, your cloud is being used to mine BitCoin, Google announces a new privacy focused product tier, North Korea hacks a UK TV studio, a new fully branded attack vector is unveiled and Purism reach their funding goal for the Librem 5.

  • Refreshing the Xubuntu logo

    Earlier this year I worked a bit with our logo to propose a small change to it – first change to the logo in 5 years. The team approved, but for various reasons the new logo did not make it to 17.10. Now we’re ready to push it out to the world.

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Security: FOSS Versus Windows

Linux/Android hacker SBC with hexa-core Rockchip SoC debuts at $75

The Vamrs “RK3399 Sapphire” SBC is on sale for $75, or $349 for a full kit. Vamrs is also prepping an RK3399-based “Rock960” 96Boards SBC. Rockchip’s RK3399 is one of the most powerful ARM-based system-on-chips available on hacker boards, featuring two server-class Cortex-A72 cores clocked to up to 2.0GHz, as well as four Cortex-A53 at up to 1.42GHz and a quad-core Mali-T864 GPU. The hexa-core SoC has appeared on T-Firefly’s Firefly-RK3399 SBC and RK3399 Coreboard computer-on-module, as well as Videostrong’s VS-RD-RK3399 SBC and Theobroma’s RK3399-Q7 Qseven module. Now we have a new contender: Shenzhen based Vamrs, which built the limited edition Rockchip RK3399 Sapphire SBC as the official RK3399 dev board for Rockchip, is now re-launching the board, which features a 40-pin Raspberry Pi compatible connector, with “many in stock” for a discounted price of $75. Read more