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Ubuntu

Servers: Kubernetes, MicroK8s and Ubuntu

Filed under
Server
Ubuntu
  • What’s up with the Kubernetes ecosystem

    This week’s acquisition of Rancher Labs by the veteran enterprise Linux firm SUSE neatly illustrates the growing momentum of container-based application deployment. It also underlines the importance of Kubernetes as the orchestration tool of choice for managing all those containers.

    So, what does this latest move mean for the broader Kubernetes ecosystem? When containers first garnered corporate attention six or seven years ago, Docker and its tools were the centre of attention. But the focus soon shifted to management frameworks capable of automating the deployment and scaling of containers, and Kubernetes, developed by Google from technology used in its cloud platform, quickly won out.

    Like many open source tools, Kubernetes has its share of rough edges and does not necessarily provide all the capabilities that users need to build a functioning container-based infrastructure. Companies such as Rancher sprang forth to provide a complete software stack built around Kubernetes for those who didn’t want to build it all themselves.

  • MicroK8s HA tech preview is now available
  • Ubuntu Support of AWS Graviton2 Instances
  • Ubuntu Support of AWS Graviton2 Instances

    Ubuntu is the industry-leading operating system for use in the cloud. Every day millions of Ubuntu instances are launched in private and public clouds around the world. Canonical takes pride in offering support for the latest cloud features and functionality.

    As of today, all Ubuntu Amazon Web Services (AWS) Marketplace listings are now updated to include support for the new Graviton2 instance types. Graviton2 is Amazon’s next-generation ARM processor delivering increased performance at a lower cost. This

Raspberry Pi 4: Could Ubuntu Be On The Way?

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

On the surface the Raspberry Pi 4 8GB may not have been a revolutionary release, but it has finally brought the power of a low cost 64 bit desktop computer to homes around the world. From day one the Raspberry Pi has used a Linux based operating system, initially a rather limited release of Debian, called Raspbian which has evolved over the years to become Raspberry Pi OS. But there are times when a more refined desktop experience would benefit the user.

For over 15 years Ubuntu have provided a Linux distribution that offers a more friendly and forgiving means to delve into the Linux ecosystem.

On a recent Ubuntu Podcast, Martin Wimpress, Director of Engineering at Canonical the company which publishes Ubuntu, hinted that “maybe we’re working on Ubuntu desktop for the Raspberry Pi”. Martin Wimpress was brought in to work on the main Ubuntu release based on his work in the Ubuntu MATE community.

There is a high chance that this will be ready for Ubuntu 20.10 due for release in October 2020.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Ubuntu Podcast, BSD Now and Bad Voltage

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S13E16 – Owls

    This week we’ve been re-installing Ubuntu 20.04. Following WWDC, we discuss Linux Desktop aspirations, bring you some command line love and go over all your wonderful feedback.

    It’s Season 13 Episode 16 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • BSD Now 358: OpenBSD Kubernetes Clusters

    Yubikey-agent on FreeBSD, Managing Kubernetes clusters from OpenBSD, History of FreeBSD part 1, Running Jitsi-Meet in a FreeBSD Jail, Command Line Bug Hunting in FreeBSD, Game of Github, Wireguard official merged into OpenBSD, and more

  • Bad Voltage 3×08: Petrichoronavirus

Ubuntu and Robotics

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu
  • Linux-based Software for Automation

    Linux has a lot to offer the automation industry. It is a stable and scalable alternative to Windows operating systems that allows for arguably greater connectivity between devices and systems. It is open-source software, which is a plus, and therefore can allow a large amount of development flexibility. Linux also generally doesn’t have as much downtime as Windows and is arguably less susceptible to cyber attacks. The fact is that as the industry leans towards Linux, so too must we adapt.

    [...]

    Well, some industries prefer Linux for the aforementioned reasons, and because of that, we could see changes in how new manufacturing technologies and techniques are designed. Overall, as Linux becomes more prevalent, we may see the OS evolve to suit a variety of needs that are specific to each industry. Advancements are in progress every day, and it’s a possibility that automation will be made much easier as the OS adapts (at an increasing rate) to the needs of its consumers. Higher quality performance, increased security, greater versatility, and many other features are being looked forward to from the next iterations of Linux.

  • Ubuntu Blog: The State of Robotics – June 2020

    ROS 2 Foxy Fitzroy was released on June 5 for Ubuntu 20.04. Foxy supports many under-the-covers performance and stability improvements. Two of our favorites that continue improving robot security include a ROS Node Definition Library (NoDL) and enhanced security monitoring.

    NoDL defines configurations for each ROS node and how it interfaces with other nodes. By defining normal behaviors, ROS now can also enforce compliance with those behaviors, and robots can be monitored for abnormal behavior.

    Foxy improves on security monitoring by enabling logging for DDS communications. Once ROS 2 security features are enabled, environment variables can be configured to log security events to a file or publish them through DDS. Now not only can you monitor operational robot behaviors, you can also monitor communications security!

    This LTS release will be supported through May 2023. See Kyle Fazzari’s blog post for more information about ROS Foxy.

    ROS 2 now also has a rolling release for preparing for the next stable distribution development. Rolling Ridley is continuously updated and will at times include breaking changes.

  • Adi Singh, Product Manager in Robotics at Canonical – Interview Series

    Adi Singh, is the Product Manager in Robotics at Canonical. Canonical specializes in open source software, including Ubuntu, the world’s most popular enterprise Linux from cloud to edge, and they have a global community of 200,000 contributors.

    Ubuntu is the most popular Linux distribution for large embedded systems. As autonomous robots mature, innovative tech companies turn to Ubuntu, we discuss advantages of building a robot using open source software and other key considerations.

    [...]

    Building anything on open source software is usually a wise idea as it allows you to stand on the shoulders of giants. Individuals and companies alike benefit from the volunteer contributions of some of the brightest minds in the world when they decide to build on a foundation of open source software. As a result, popular FOSS repositories are very robustly engineered and very actively maintained; allowing users to focus on their innovation rather than the nuts and bolts of every library going into their product.

    [...]

    Ubuntu is the platform of choice for developers around the world for frictionless IoT and robotics development. A number of popular frameworks that help with device engineering are built on Ubuntu, so the OS is able to provide several tools for building and deploying products in this area right out of the box. For instance, the most widely used middleware for robotics development – ROS – is almost entirely run on Ubuntu distros...

  • NFV, cloud-native networking and OSM: everything you need to know
  • Design and Web team summary – 8th July 2020

    The web team here at Canonical run two-week iterations. Here are some of the highlights of our completed work from this iteration.

Canonical enables Linux desktop app support with Flutter

Filed under
Linux
Google
Ubuntu

Google’s goal for Flutter has always been to provide a portable framework for building beautiful UIs that run at native speeds no matter what platform you target. To validate this capability, we started by focusing on the mobile platforms, Android and iOS, where we’ve seen more than 80,000 fast, beautiful Flutter apps published to Google Play.

To build on this success, for more than a year we’ve been expanding our focus to include desktop-class experiences, both for the web and for the desktop OSes: macOS, Windows and Linux. This work includes extensive refactoring of the engine to support desktop-style mouse and keyboard input as well as resizable top-level windows. It also includes new UI capabilities that adapt well to desktop, like Material Density support and the NavigationRail and experiments with deep integration into the underlying desktop OS with experiments in Dart:FFI and access to the system menu bar and standard dialogs. All of this work was to ensure that in addition to being suitable for mobile-style experiences, Flutter is ready to handle full-featured, full-sized desktop apps.

It has long been our vision for Flutter to power platforms. We’ve seen this manifest already at Google with products like the Assistant so now we’re thrilled to see others harnessing Flutter to power more platforms. Today we are happy to jointly announce the availability of the Linux alpha for Flutter alongside Canonical, the publisher of Ubuntu, the world’s most popular desktop Linux distribution.

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Also: Must Read: Google & Ubuntu Team Up to Bring Flutter Apps to Linux

Google's Flutter: Now developers can use it to build apps for Ubuntu Linux machines

Google and Canonical partner to bring Linux apps support to Flutter

Google and Canonical bring Flutter apps to Linux and the Snap Store

ScreenKey Shows Keyboard Presses on Screen in Ubuntu

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

Mac and Windows screencasters have access to a wide array of apps designed specifically to display key presses on screen as they are typed with macOS tool Screenflick perhaps the best known.

But for Ubuntu? You’ll want to try Screenkey.

Screenkey is a free, open-source alternative to Screenflick designed for use on Linux desktops, like Ubuntu. When run the app shows each key press on screen as it’s pressed (and while you record, perhaps using the hidden GNOME Shell screen recorder).

The majority of Ubuntu users won’t have much use for this tool. But for the 0.25% making video tutorials, explanatory gifs, or other how-to related content? For them Screenkey will be invaluable.

Put simply: if you need to illustrate actions associated with a specific keyboard shortcut or command in a screenshot or video clip there is nothing easier to use than this.

Screenkey features multi-monitor support, lets you customise font size, font style, and font colour, and offers a crop of advanced settings to control position, timing, opacity, specific character key presses, and more.

You can also choose what shortcut activates the app, and decide whether multimedia keys (e.g., volume, pause, brightness, etc) are supported or not.

ScreenKey Shows Keyboard Presses on Screen in Ubuntu

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Also: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 638

How to access Samsung DeX mode on Linux and Chrome OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu
Gadgets

Google has yet to offer a full-fledged desktop interface in Android, but you can access the hidden barebones version of it on some devices running Android 10. A handful of OEMs, on the other hand, offer their own implementations of the desktop mode, and Samsung’s DeX is inarguably the most polished and feature-rich option among them. The latest version of Samsung DeX can even seamlessly integrate itself with Macs and Windows PCs.

While Samsung did backport DeX for PC support to older flagships, they still don’t provide an official Linux (and Chrome OS) companion app corresponding to this handy feature. From the perspective of a regular Samsung user who uses Linux, it means that you could only access the DeX mode if you had an external display. There is no OS level limitation per se, so XDA Senior Member KMyers has decided to create a proof-of-concept technique that ultimately works as a Linux client for Samsung DeX.

[...]

Typical features like clipboard sharing and drag-and-drop installation of APK files are working without issue in this method, but sound routing is a bit messy. You might have to compile scrcpy from source, though, because the available build on the default package repository of Debian based operating systems (e.g., Ubuntu and the Crostini environment on Chrome OS) is usually outdated. This step can be particularly problematic on ARM-powered Chrome OS devices, so opt for cross-compiling instead.

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Screen Zoom and Mouse Indicator on Ubuntu 20.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

Ubuntu can help you to enlarge screen items and easily display cursor movements to your audience. This article is a company to Focal For Teachers and continuation to Screen Zoom on KDE. This is practicable to every GNOME operating system not only Ubuntu but also Fedora, Red Hat, Zorin and others. You can watch practical examples in this new video below and also image editing videos I published recently. For teachers and tutorial makers, this article is for you. Enjoy!

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RPI 4 & Ubuntu MATE - Audio configuration

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu
HowTos

If there was a problem, yo I solve it. We just did. We have audio, and that means our Pi 4 board is now becoming a proper computer in its own right. After all, I set upon this ambitious journey to transform my Raspberry into a full-experience mini desktop, and we're getting there. When I introduced my project in the first article, I promised you a bunch of guides, and I hope you're happy with the results.

We're not done. We still have a few more tasks ahead of us. I'm also going to show how to tweak the Network Manager, and we will also have a generic MATE desktop tutorial. Y'know, all the fine bits and pieces that will steer us toward a seamless, perhaps even perfect experience. Applications, themes, icons, desktop settings, the whole deal. So stay tuned for another slice of Pi. Word to your Tux.

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Canonical Outs Important Linux Kernel Security Updates for All Supported Ubuntu Releases

Filed under
Linux
Security
Ubuntu

The most important security issue fixed in this new Linux kernel update was discovered in the SELinux network label handling implementation by Matthew Sheets. This vulnerability (CVE-2020-10711) affects Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, 19.10, 18.04 LTS, and 16.04 LTS, and could allow a remote attacker to cause a denial of service (system crash).

On Ubuntu 19.10 and Ubuntu 18.04 LTS systems using either Linux 5.3 or 5.0 kernels, the new security update addresses another important vulnerability (CVE-2020-10751) discovered by Dmitry Vyukov in the SELinux netlink security hook, which could allow a privileged attacker to bypass SELinux netlink restrictions.

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More in Tux Machines

Debian Janitor: 8,200 landed changes landed so far

The Debian Janitor is an automated system that commits fixes for (minor) issues in Debian packages that can be fixed by software. It gradually started proposing merges in early December. The first set of changes sent out ran lintian-brush on sid packages maintained in Git. This post is part of a series about the progress of the Janitor. The bot has been submitting merge requests for about seven months now. The rollout has happened gradually across the Debian archive, and the bot is now enabled for all packages maintained on Salsa , GitLab , GitHub and Launchpad. Read more

Optimised authentication methods for Ubuntu Desktop

Still counting on passwords to protect your workstation? When set up properly, alternatives to passwords provide a streamlined user experience while significantly improving security. These alternative authentication methods can also easily be combined to create a custom and adaptive authentication profile. This whitepaper introduces three popular authentication methods that provide a solid alternative to passwords. Perhaps you’d like to configure your laptop for login using a YubiKey hardware token connected to a dock. Another option could be to login with a Duo push notification when not connected to the dock, but use a Google Authenticator one-time password when no network is available. Maybe you need a separate hardware token just for ssh authentication, and you always need to keep a long, complex password for emergency authentication should all other methods fail. All of these scenarios can be easily configured within Ubuntu. Read more

Open Hardware: Arduino, RISC-V and 96Boards

  • Arduino-controlled robot arm is ready to play you in a game of chess

    If you’re tired of playing chess on a screen, then perhaps you could create a robotic opponent like Instructables user Michalsky. The augmented board runs micro-Max source code, enabling chess logic to be executed on an Arduino Mega with room for control functions for a 6DOF robotic arm. The setup uses magnetic pieces, allowing it to pick up human moves via an array of 64 reed switches underneath, along with a couple shift registers. The Mega powers the robot arm accordingly, lifting the appropriate piece and placing it on the correct square.

  • New RISC-V CTO On Open Source Chip Architecture’s Global Data Center Momentum

    With more big international players on board, the foundation's new head of technology sees signs of "state of the art moving forward."

  • Snapdragon 410 based 96Boards CE SBC gets an upgrade

    Geniatech has launched a Linux-ready, $109 “Developer Board 4 V3” compliant with 96Boards CE that offers a Snapdragon 410E, GbE, 3x USB, 802.11ac, GPS, and-25 to 70°C support. Geniatech has released a V3 edition of its 96Boards CE form-factor Developer Board 4 SBC, the third update of the Development Board IV we covered back in 2016. Starting at $109, the Developer Board 4 V3 still runs Linux, Android, and Windows 10 IoT Core on Qualcomm’s 1.2GHz, quad -A53 Snapdragon 410m, although it has been upgraded to the 10-year availability Snapdragon 410E. Geniatech also sells a line of Rockchip based SBCs, among other embedded products.

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack and Linux Headlines

  • LHS Episode #360: Zapped

    Welcome to the 360th episode of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this short-topic show, the hosts discuss 1.2GHz distance records, a hybrid antenna for geosynchronous satellite operation, data mode identification for your smart phone, being pwned, Ubuntu 20.04.1, LibreOffice, HamClock and much more. Thanks for listening and hope you have a great week.

  • LHS Episode #361: The Weekender LIV

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

  • 2020-08-14 | Linux Headlines

    Google could be extending its Firefox search royalty deal, PyPy leaves the Software Freedom Conservancy, Ubuntu puts out a call for testing, Linspire removes snapd support, Microsoft showcases its open source contributions, and Facebook joins The Linux Foundation.