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Ubuntu

Ubuntu is adding a dock. Here's why that's important

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Ubuntu

I know, it really doesn't sound like a headline that should be taking up too much space or time. Ubuntu is adding a dock to GNOME. Big deal. It is, after all, nothing more than an extension that anyone can add from the GNOME Extension site.

Or is it?

I am actually one that believes this to be a very important move for Ubuntu. No matter how inconsequential it may be, to the world at large, this is all about one thing for Canonical.

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Ubuntu Leftovers

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Ubuntu

Tiny, rugged, open-spec SBC plugs into carrier or breadboards

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Linux
Ubuntu

FriendlyElec’s WiFi-ready, $8 “NanoPi Duo” runs Linux on a quad -A7 Allwinner H2+, and can plug into a $10 RPi-like carrier or any standard breadboard.

FriendlyElec has added to its line of open spec, community backed NanoPi SBCs with an IoT-focused, $8 NanoPi Duo SBC that can plug into a $10 “Mini Shield” carrier board or any standard breadboard. The NanoPi Duo measures just 50 x 25.4 (1,270 sq. mm) making it one of the smallest Linux-ready SBCs around, even smaller than the 40 x 40mm (1,600 sq. mm) NanoPi Neo line of boards, such as the latest NanoPi Neo Plus2.

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Debian and Ubuntu; BBQ Cambridge, Artful Aardvark Feature Freeze

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Ubuntu
  • BBQ Cambridge 2017 - post 2

    We were all up until about 0100 Smile House full of folk talking about all sorts, a game of Mao. Garden full of people clustered round the barbeque or sitting chatting - I had a long chat about Debian, what it means and how it's often an easier world to deal with and move in than the world of work, office politics or whatever - being here is being at home.

  • BBQ Cambridge 2017 - post 3
  • OMGWTFBBQ Cambridge 2017

    Funny this - I only blog when I'm in Cambridge Smile I'm sure there's a blog back in the day from a BBQ a good few years ago. This is almost deja vu - a room full of Debian types - the crazy family - Thinkpads on a lot of laps and lots of chat around the room.

  • Let's send patches to debian-policy (rst file is your friend Smile

    As I posted before, now debian-policy package uses Sphinx. It means, you can edit and send patches for Debian Policy easier than ever. Get source (install devscripts package and exec 'debcheck debian-policy')  and dig into policy directory. There are several rst files for each chapter.

  • Artful Aardvark (to be 17.10) feature freeze

    While this email comes a bit late, if you've been watching your calendars, you know that Artful has been in Feature Freeze since yesterday.

    Ideally you will all now be focusing on bug fixing and not on getting new features into the release.

    As is the custom, packages that have been uploaded to artful-proposed prior to the feature freeze deadline, but have gotten stuck there, remain candidates for fixing between now and release.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Enters The Feature Freeze

    Ubuntu 17.10, the Artful Aardvark, has crossed into the feature freeze this week.

    Ubuntu developers are now to be focused on fixing bugs rather than on introducing new features for 17.10, which will be officially released at the middle of October.

    There still though is the possibility of feature freeze exceptions to be granted as well as those packages currently residing in artful-proposed are still able to land. Confirmation of the Artful feature freeze was posted today to the mailing list.

System76's Pop!_OS Weekly Update

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu
  • Pop!_OS Weekly Update: 17.10, Distro Settings, and Default Apps

    At System76 we all work in the same office so keeping the external Pop!_OS community involved and up-to-date is an interesting challenge. So far we’ve been communicating our ideas and work through our chat channel and blog. This week we decided to hold our first System76+Community meeting in Pop!_Chat to discuss default settings and apps. While the overall outcome was fantastic, there are definitely ways we can increase bandwidth between those at System76 HQ and community members around the world. We’re working on some ideas.

  • System76's Pop!_OS Not Using Wayland By Default, Figuring Out Default Apps

    -
    System76 continues working on their Ubuntu fork called Pop!_OS that they intend to ship on their future laptops and desktops. They have now decided on some of the default applications as well as the decision to not yet ship Wayland by default.

    System76 has been migrating the Pop!_OS base from Ubuntu 17.04 to 17.10 and made improvements around that to reduce the ISO size and memory usage. They have also decided for their initial release they will continue using the X.Org Server while the Wayland session will just be optional. They aren't yet moving to Wayland due to concerns around unsupported applications and confusion to users when applications are running into problems because of Wayland.

Debian and Ubuntu: Debate About Proprietary Services, Ubuntu Looks and More

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian debates software for proprietary services

    Distributions like Debian have a clear policy on the software they ship; as a general rule, only free software can be considered for inclusion. How that policy should be applied to software that interacts with proprietary systems is not entirely clear, though. A recent discussion on a package that interfaces with a proprietary network service seems unlikely to lead to any changes in policy, but it does highlight a fault line within the Debian community.

    Back in February, Jonas Smedegaard filed a bug against the "certspotter" package, complaining that the package's description advertises the proprietary SSLMate service. On August 4, the maintainer of that package, Faidon Liambotis, got around to answering the bug, saying that the description is helpful for users searching for the package and will not be removed. At that point, Smedegaard took the discussion to the debian-project mailing list in an attempt to rally the Debian developer community against the offending package description.

  • Install Numix Theme And Icons in Ubuntu/Linux Mint
  • Violet Comeback theme Gives A Nice Dark Look To Ubuntu

    Violet-comeback theme is the GTK2/GTK3 counterpart to the Qt5/KDE color scheme "Violet Comeback". It was mainly designed to make GTK applications match with KDE Violet color scheme, but it is also compatible with Gnome, Unity, Xfce, Cinnamon, Mate and so on. As creator mentioned this theme is based on Numix and generated with oomox. Since this theme is in active development some issues exist in the GTK3 version: there are no borders at all on some windows and no shadow, which make the look a bit too flat. The windows cannot be handled properly. If you find any other bug in the theme then report it and hopefully it will get fixed.

  • Exploring snappy package manager. Why it is awesome and how to get started.
  • Ubuntu 16.04.3 Point Release, A Short Review & Upgrade Howto

    Ubuntu Xenial Point Release 3, or 16.04.3, has been released at 03 August 2017. Here's some review, download links, and how to upgrade from 16.04 or 14.04.

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Ubuntu 17.10 Continues Refining Its GNOME Shell Theme

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GNOME
Ubuntu

Will Cooke of Canonical is out with another weekly update on the latest happenings for the Ubuntu 17.10 desktop as the "Artful Aardvark" release continues getting closer.

There's been continued work on captive portal detection for Ubuntu 17.10, QPDF/CUPS package upgrades, and a lot of theming work happening this past week for the next Ubuntu release, which has transitioned from the Unity 7 desktop to GNOME Shell. And yes, Wayland still plans to be the default.

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Ubuntu: Mark Shuttleworth, System Cleaner, Applets and Ubuntu Dock, Ubuntu Podcast and More

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Ubuntu
  • No strategic change for Canonical, says Mark Shuttleworth

    Mark Shuttleworth doesn't intend to make any "significant change" to Canonical's executive direction and strategy now that he has resumed his position as CEO.

    The founder of Canonical, behind the open source operating system Ubuntu, retook his former post as head of the company in July, replacing the long-serving Jane Silber, who took over for him in 2010 when he transitioned to a more product-focused role.

    "She had a good stint, which was extended several times, and so now it's my turn back at the helm," Shuttleworth told IT Pro in an interview last week. However, he made it clear that he was not planning on making any major changes to the company's business model.

    "She and I have worked closely throughout her tenure," he said. "It doesn't really represent a very significant change in executive direction, because she and I were always pretty closely aligned on how we wanted things to work."

  • Ubuntu System Cleaner ‘Stacer’ Has Binned Electron

    The popular utility, which is best described as a cross between CCleaner for Ubuntu and a regular system monitor, has been rewritten in C++ for its latest release.

    Yup, the Ubuntu cleaner app has binned Electron — news that will please many of you, I’m sure!

    The rewrite also means the app now uses fewer resources when running, and is, overall, more responsive too.

  • New Features: Ubuntu 17.10 Will Ship With Indicator Applets And New Ubuntu Dock

    Ubuntu Desktop team is busy making the final transition to GNOME Shell and polishing the end user experience. To bring the best of both worlds, the team has added a new Ubuntu Dock and support for Indicator Applets. Ubuntu 17.10 will also come with the trash shortcut on the desktop. Ubuntu 17.10, codenamed Artful Aardvark, will finally arrive on October 19, 2017.

  • Materialistic Gorgeous Cabbage - Ubuntu Podcast
  • Canonical Distribution of Kubernetes: Development Summary- August 24
  • Plasma 5.10.5 and Frameworks 5.37 updates now in backports PPA for Zesty 17.04

    The final 5.10.5 bugfix update of the Plasma 5.10 series is now available for users of Kubuntu Zesty Zapus 17.04 to install via our backports PPA.

New Features: Ubuntu 17.10 Will Ship With Indicator Applets And New Ubuntu Dock

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu Desktop team is busy making the final transition to GNOME Shell and polishing the end user experience. To bring the best of both worlds, the team has added a new Ubuntu Dock and support for Indicator Applets. Ubuntu 17.10 will also come with the trash shortcut on the desktop. Ubuntu 17.10, codenamed Artful Aardvark, will finally arrive on October 19, 2017.

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Ubuntu: Nimbusoft, SnapRoute, Artful Aardvark, Kubernetes

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Ubuntu
  • Meet the Laptops & Desktop PCs Being Sold with Ubuntu Budgie

    UK-based computer outfit Nimbusoft is gearing up to sell two laptops and an all-in-one desktop PC pre-loaded with the aforementioned nimble, GNOME-based Ubuntu spin.

    Product pages for these “Ubuntu Budgie Edition” devices are live over on the Nimbusoft website, although neither the company or the Ubuntu Budgie project itself has made an announcement about the partnership.

  • SnapRoute Integrates its FlexSwitch with Canonical’s Ubuntu

    SnapRoute and Canonical joined forces to create an integrated software stack for white-box switch deployments. They’re combining SnapRoute’s FlexSwitch and Canonical’s Ubuntu operating system for cloud environments.

    The FlexSwitch+Ubuntu stack is certified on multiple white-box switches including the Facebook Wedge 100, according to the partners.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Shifts To Linux 4.12, Linux 4.13 Still In Testing

    The Ubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark has finally moved past the Linux 4.11 kernel and now has a 4.12-based kernel in its main archive.

  • Canonical announces further enterprise Kubernetes support options

    Canonical continues to push forward with its Kubernetes container DevOps management plans. In its latest move, Ubuntu Linux's parent company announced two consulting packages for enterprise Kubernetes deployments. In addition, it's offering expanded enterprise support with partners. This will include Galactic Fog's serverless infrastructure, Rancher's container management workflow, and Weaveworks' Weave Cloud.

    This comes as Canonical prepares for an initial public offering (IPO). These moves are both to gain new cloud and container customers and to show that Canonical is laser-focused on the enterprise market. Earlier, Canonical had tried, and failed, to dominate the Linux desktop and become a smartphone leader.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.