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Ubuntu

Ubuntu GNOME 17.04 Flavor, the Future of Ubuntu Linux, Launches with GNOME 3.24

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GNOME
Ubuntu

As part of today's Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) release, the Ubuntu GNOME 17.04 official flavor made its appearance online as well, so we can now have an in-depth look at its new features.

Ubuntu GNOME 17.04 is the first release of the flavor to ship with an up-to-date GNOME Stack, based on the recently released GNOME 3.24 desktop environment, which is a major update introducing numerous novelties, such as Night Light, a cool feature to protect your eyes by automatically reducing the blue light emitted by your computer's screen.

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Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) Officially Released, Available to Download Now

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Ubuntu

Today, April 13, 2017, Canonical released the final version of the Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system, which has been in development for the past six months, since last October's launch of Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak).

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System76's "Galago Pro" Looks to Be the First Laptop Preloaded with Ubuntu 17.04

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Ubuntu

System76 announced today on their Twitter account that pre-orders are available for "Galago Pro," an all-new and powerful laptop preloaded with the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system.

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Also: System76 all-new 'Galago Pro' Ubuntu Linux laptop now available for pre-order

More Ubuntu Good News, Bad News

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu and Canonical: Mir, Moves, and Layoffs

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Ubuntu
  • Why Mir

    Mir currently works with mesa-kms graphics, mesa-x11 graphics or android HWC graphics (work has been done on vulkan graphics and is well beyond proof-of-concept but hasn’t been released).

    Switching the driver support doesn’t impact the shell or applications. (Servers will run unchanged on mesa, on X11 and android.) Mir provides “abstractions” so that, for example, user input or display configuration changes look the same to servers and client applications regardless of the drivers being used.

  • Mir Developer Pleads The Case "Why Mir"

    Canonical developer Alan Griffiths has been blogging a lot in recent days about the Mir display server. He's been trying to get the community to support Mir and even potentially add native Wayland client support. His latest post is entitled "Why Mir" with many still wondering why they should care about Mir when Wayland has proven to be the tested and widely-adopted path forward.

    Griffiths talks up Mir's abstractions, Mir's support for Mesa KMS/X11 and Android HWC graphics (though they too are all capable with Wayland), "beyond proof of concept" Vulkan support even though that isn't public yet and Wayland Vulkan support is, and Mir as a display server provides "sensible defaults."

  • A new vantage point

    I joined Canonical as COO in 2004, excited by the vision of Ubuntu and the possibilities that could unfold from the software, the collaboration with the open source community, the energy of an international, distributed start-up and the impact it could have on the world. When Mark asked me to become CEO in 2010, I added the challenge of driving commercial success to that list. The intervening years, and the adjective/animal pairs, have flown by and I’m still excited by Canonical and those very same things.

  • Canonical sharpens post-Unity axe for 80-plus Ubuntu spinners

    More than 80 Canonical workers are facing the axe as founder Mark Shuttleworth has taken back the role of chief executive officer.

    The number, revealed today by The Reg, comes as Shuttleworth assumed the position from CEO of eight years Jane Silber, previously chief operating officer.

    The Reg has learned 31 or more staffers have already left the Ubuntu Linux maker ahead of Shuttleworth's rise, with at least 26 others now on formal notice and uncertainty surrounding the remainder.

Mark Shuttleworth Is Indeed Taking Back Over As Canonical CEO

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Ubuntu

Last week we were the first to exclusively report that Jane Silber would be out as Canonical's CEO with Mark Shuttleworth returning to the role as CEO. Today, Jane Silber has publicly announced she's indeed stepping down.

Jane Silber announced today she's indeed stepping down as Canonical enters "a new phase of accelerated growth."

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Leftovers: Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

Canonical's Snappy Team Releases Snapd 2.24 with Many Cross-Distro Improvements

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Ubuntu

Canonical's Michael Vogt is pleased to announce today, April 11, 2017, the release and immediate availability for download of the Snapd 2.24 Snappy daemon for Ubuntu Linux and other supported GNU/Linux distributions.

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Open hacker board takes aim at Raspberry Pi 3

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Android
Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

The $30 Orange Pi Prime combines a quad Cortex-A53 Allwinner H5 SoC with 2GB RAM, wireless, MIPI-CSI, GbE, and a 40-pin expansion header.

Another Orange Pi has shaken loose from Shenzhen Xunlong’s highly productive Orange Pi tree in the form of an Orange Pi Prime that matches up nicely with the Raspberry Pi 3. There were already a half dozen distinct Orange Pi models by our year-end Linux hacker SBC roundup, and in only about three months, that tally has almost doubled if you include every new variant. Within a few years, the company’s engineers will no doubt have tested out every possible combination of size, RAM, I/O, and hacker board layout possible with an Allwinner processor.

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Snap support lands in Fedora 24, 25 & 26

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Red Hat
Ubuntu

As part as our mission to get snaps running everywhere, we are pleased to announce that support for snaps has now officially landed in Fedora, starting with Fedora 24 and up.

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More in Tux Machines

Microsoft Begs, Bugs, and Bug Doors

  • Don't install our buggy Windows 10 Creators Update, begs Microsoft
    Microsoft has urged non-tech-savvy people – or anyone who just wants a stable computer – to not download and install this year's biggest revision to Windows by hand. And that's because it may well bork your machine. It's been two weeks since Microsoft made its Creators Update available, and we were previously warned it will be a trickle-out rather than a massive rollout. Now, Redmond has urged users to stop manually fetching and installing the code, and instead wait for it to be automatically offered to your computer when it's ready.
  • Microsoft Word flaw took so long to fix that hackers used it to send fraud software to millions of computers
    A flaw in Microsoft Word took the tech giant so long to fix that hackers were able to use it to send fraud software to millions of computers, it has been revealed. The security flaw, officially known as CVE-2017-0199, could allow a hacker to seize control of a personal computer with little trace, and was fixed on April 11 in Microsoft's regular monthly security update - nine months after it was discovered.

FOSS Licensing (and Lack Thereof)

  • Portugal to harmonise usability of govt portals
    All of the code, information and tools are made available for reuse.
  • JRC: ‘Releasing code without a licence hinders reuse’
    Projects that publish source code without a licence weaken the reusability of their code, warns Stefano Gentile, a copyright and trademark specialist working for the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre (JRC). Currently just 20 % of all projects published on GitHub, one of the most popular source code sharing platforms, have selected a licence for their work - down from about 60% in 2008, Gentile said, quoting numbers published in 2015 by GitHub.
  • React to React
    The Additional Grant of Patent Rights is a patent license grant that includes certain termination criteria. These termination criteria are not entirely unprecedented when you look at the history of patent license provisions in OSI-approved licenses, but they are certainly broader than the termination criteria [or the equivalent] in several familiar modern licenses (the Apache License 2.0, EPL, MPL 2.0, and GPLv3).
  • BetConstruct declares the source code for its front-end as open source
    The project is distributed under MIT license.

Automotive Grade Linux Adds New Members

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Red Hat Bets on Innovation in the Channel
    Red Hat has launched the Red Hat Application Partner Initiative, working with partners to build a practice around core platforms for emerging use cases. IT solution providers tend to focus more on technologies that are just hitting the top of the bell curve in terms of mainstream adoption. But Red Hat is making a case for partners to place more focus on emerging technologies.
  • Huawei takes on servers, HPC and cloud with Red Hat, Intel and GE
    Company unveils plans to build high performance computing centres in in Shenzhen and Chengdu, China, and in Munich, Germany. Chinese ICT company Huawei has unveiled a series of agreements and collaborations with some of the world’s largest companies to advance cloud and high performance computing (HPC). Firstly, Huawei has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Intel to cooperate in HPC.
  • Red Hat Unveils JBoss AMQ 7
    Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today introduced Red Hat JBoss AMQ 7. The latest release of Red Hat's messaging platform combines the performance and efficiency of reactive programming with a more flexible architecture, giving customers a strong foundation for building distributed, reactive message-driven applications.
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT): What’s the Story?
  • FCAIC in the House, part III
    Ok, not that “Hello”. I’ve been writing quarterly updates on what I’m working on to help the Fedora Community. If you’re new to the party, welcome. I have the privilege of being the current Fedora Community Action and Impact Coordinator. I wrote last week on the Red Hat Community blog about what this role means and how it interacts with the world.