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Ubuntu

Leostream Joins Canonical's Partner Program to Accelerate Ubuntu OpenStack Virtual Desktop Deployments

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Ubuntu

Leostream Corporation, a leading developer of hosted desktop connection management software, and Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, the leading OS for container, cloud, scale-out and hyperscale computing, today announced that Leostream has joined the Charm Partner Programme to facilitate the deployment of virtual desktops on Ubuntu OpenStack. The partner program helps solution providers make best use of Canonical's model driven operations system, Juju; enabling instant workload deployment, integration, and scaling on any public or private cloud, as well as bare metal with just a click of a button. The Juju Charm Store has a rapidly growing number of charms available to DevOps teams, with hundreds of cloud-based applications available.

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Parrot and Ubuntu score a S.L.A.M.dunk in robot drone navigation

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Ubuntu

In the hope that this joke never sees the light of day again, Linux distro maker Canonical and drone maker Parrot have joined forces to create S.L.A.M.dunk, a development kit to help design autonomous vehicles that avoid obstacles even in the most innest of indoors.

The system uses a combination of Ubuntu and ROS (Robot Operating System) to provide an environment for prototyping self-driving, 3D mapping or data gathering. Attaching it to a drone turns it into an "intelligent robot", according to Ubuntu.

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You Can Now Download a Single ISO Image with All the Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS Flavors

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Softpedia was informed today, September 8, 2016, by Željko Popivoda from the Linux AIO team about the availability of an updated Linux AIO Ubuntu Live ISO image, based on Canonical's recently released Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS (Xenial Xerus) OS.

Yes, you're reading it right, Linux AIO Ubuntu 16.04.1 Live ISO images are now available for download in 64-bit and 32-bit variants, based on the Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS Live ISO images, which were officially released on July 21, 2016, and they include all the essential Ubuntu Linux flavors.

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Ubuntu Phone Now Has a Nifty, Native Photo Editing App

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu Phone finally has a photo editing app. Although early alpha quality, Instant FX for Ubuntu is already looking like an impressive app. And with so few native Ubuntu apps around, each one is truly appreciated. Now, obvious things first: InstantFX is very obviously styled around the Instagram Android & iOS app’s editing interface.

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Ubuntu Leftovers

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Ubuntu
  • Run Widgets on Your Ubuntu Desktop with Plexydesk

    If I asked you about Plexydesk you’d probably look at be blankly. I last mentioned the promising widget-toting project five years ago today. Curious as to what became of it I went on a Google today. It only took a few characters strokes to discover that the project is still very much alive.

  • Tesla Autopilot 2.0 Capabilities Demoed With Ubuntu

    I don’t drive, so self-driving cars should be right up my one-way street, right?

    I can’t feign interest. I’m not a particularly mechanical person, barring a brief spurt of Moto-X (the sport, not the handset) at the turn of the decade. I don’t even like Top Gear.

  • Intel Graphics Update Tool Adds Support for Ubuntu 16.04

    Intel's graphic update tool has been updated to support Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Fedora 24. It offers users the Intel 2016Q2 graphics stack.

Tiny $7 IoT module packs WiFi, BLE, and sensors, runs FreeRTOS

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Debian
Ubuntu

SeeedStudio’s “ESP3212” COM taps Espressif’s IoT-focused ESP32 follow-on to the ESP8266 SoC, which uses a faster Tensilica LX6 MCU and adds BLE and sensors.

Espressif’s highly integrated and highly anticipated ESP32 follow-on to its popular ESP8266 wireless system-on-chip is now shipping. It’s available as part of a tiny SeedStudio ESP3212 computer-on-module, as well on Espressif’s own, slightly larger ESP-WROOM-32 reference design board and more expansive ESP32 Development Board.

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Ubuntu 16.04 kisses the cloud, disses the desktop

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Ubuntu

With Ubuntu 16.04LTS (Xenial Xerus), Canonical has introduced incremental improvements to the popular server and cloud versions of its operating system, but if you were looking for exciting changes to desktop Ubuntu, this version isn’t it.

The 16.04 release is an iterative, not necessarily massive improvement. But this is an Long Term Service (LTS) version, which means that there’s a team working on keeping it solid for five years. So, into the next decade, 16.04 gets patched and fixed, as other versions continue to be released on a regular basis.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

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Debian
Ubuntu

Leftovers: Ubuntu

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Ubuntu
  • Should You Upgrade To Ubuntu 16.04 From Ubuntu 14.04

    Ubuntu 16.04 has been out for about 4 months now and it is the latest long term support release which gurarantees support for 5 more years.

    Do you need to upgrade to Ubuntu 16.04 right now or should you wait a while? In this guide I am going to list reasons for and against upgrading to Ubuntu 16.04 and help you to decide when it is right for you.

  • Ubuntu Working On Improved Low Graphics Mode For Unity 7

    While Ubuntu developers continue work on preparing the Unity 8 desktop for rolling out across all form-factors, Unity 7 is still seeing some new improvements as their interim desktop solution.

  • 5 Things We Secretly Miss About Ubuntu

    Sure, it’s super stable, far more compatible, and less buggy than it was a few years back. The polish and professionalism mirrors Canonical’s own transition from scrappy startup to server-ruling stalwart.

Ubuntu Touch OTA-13 to Be Released on September 14, Add Numerous Improvements

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Ubuntu

We've been asked by many of our readers what's going on with the development of the next major OTA software update for Canonical's Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system for Ubuntu Phone and Ubuntu Tablet devices, the OTA-13.

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Early Benchmarks Of The Linux 4.9 DRM-Next Radeon/AMDGPU Drivers

While Linux 4.9 will not officially open for development until next week, the DRM-Next code is ready to roll with all major feature work having been committed by the different open-source Direct Rendering Manager drivers. In this article is some preliminary testing of this DRM-Next code as of 29 September when testing various AMD GPUs with the Radeon and AMDGPU DRM drivers. Linux 4.9 does bring compile-time-offered experimental support for the AMD Southern Islands GCN 1.0 hardware on AMDGPU, but that isn't the focus of this article. A follow-up comparison is being done with GCN 1.0/1.1 experimental support enabled to see the Radeon vs. AMDGPU performance difference on that hardware. For today's testing was a Radeon R7 370 to look at the Radeon DRM performance and for AMDGPU testing was the Radeon R9 285, R9 Fury, and RX 480. Benchmarks were done from the Linux 4.8 Git and Linux DRM-Next kernels as of 29 September. Read more

How to Effectively and Efficiently Edit Configuration Files in Linux

Every Linux administrator has to eventually (and manually) edit a configuration file. Whether you are setting up a web server, configuring a service to connect to a database, tweaking a bash script, or troubleshooting a network connection, you cannot avoid a dive deep into the heart of one or more configuration files. To some, the prospect of manually editing configuration files is akin to a nightmare. Wading through what seems like countless lines of options and comments can put you on the fast track for hair and sanity loss. Which, of course, isn’t true. In fact, most Linux administrators enjoy a good debugging or configuration challenge. Sifting through the minutiae of how a server or software functions is a great way to pass time. But this process doesn’t have to be an exercise in ineffective inefficiency. In fact, tools are available to you that go a very long way to make the editing of config files much, much easier. I’m going to introduce you to a few such tools, to ease some of the burden of your Linux admin duties. I’ll first discuss the command-line tools that are invaluable to the task of making configuration more efficient. Read more

Why Good Linux Sysadmins Use Markdown

The Markdown markup language is perfect for writing system administrator documentation: it is lightweight, versatile, and easy to learn, so you spend your time writing instead of fighting with formatting. The life of a Linux system administrator is complex and varied, and you know that documenting your work is a big time-saver. A documentation web server shared by you and your colleagues is a wonderful productivity tool. Most of us know simple HTML, and can whack up a web page as easily as writing plain text. But using Markdown is better. Read more

Purism’s next product could be a smartphone that runs Linux/free software

Purism is a company that’s been developing laptops and tablets that run Linux-based, free and open source software for a few years. Now Purism is considering building a smartphone and the company is soliciting feedback from potential customers. The idea would be to release a Librem Phone that runs GNU/Linux rather than Android, and which offers security and privacy features to help set it apart from most other phones on the market. Read more