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Ubuntu

Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 Review: The Perfect Blend of Ubuntu and Budgie Desktop

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Solus Linux is loved for many reasons. Its flagship desktop environment Budgie, in my opinion, is the biggest reason to love Solus. While there was no shortage of desktop environments in the Linux domain, the arrival and the acceptance of Budgie desktop environment by a widespread audience, clearly showed that there was a huge scope (or even a need?) for a modern, intuitive and non-intrusive desktop environment.

But all is not well in Solus land. Solus unlike a majority of Linux distros is not based on any other parent distro. Solus is written from scratch and has it’s own package management system and software repository. I loved Solus 3. But as an ardent Linux user, I need the latest packages and support from newer software, which, at the moment is not that good on Solus. The software repository is not as vast as that of Ubuntu. Also, the package manager itself needs to evolve.

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Canonical Says There's No Rules Against Mining Cryptocurrencies through Snaps

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Ubuntu

Last week, users discovered that two of the snap packages uploaded by user Nicolas Tomb in the Snap Store, namely 2048buntu and Hextris, mined cryptocurrency in the background while the applications were running without user's knowledge. Canonical immediately removed the apps from its Snap Store.

Now, the company behind the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system is addressing the issue saying it has no rules against mining cryptocurrencies through snap apps if the developer informs users about this. As Nicolas Tomb didn't inform users that his apps are mining for cryptocurrencies, the apps were removed.

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Also: Canonical finally comments on Ubuntu Linux Snap Store security failure

Ubuntu News: Ubuntu 18.10, Ubuntu Make, Weekly Newsletter Issue 527

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Ubuntu

Kali Linux vs Ubuntu – Which Distro is Better for Hacking?

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Development
Ubuntu

Kali Linux is the most popular penetration testing and hacking Linux distroibution and Ubuntu is the most popular Linux distribution. Since it is kind of common knowledge that Linux is a more convenient OS to use for hacking than Windows, the next question is a no-brainer; which Linux distro is the best to use for hacking?

But what is hacking anyway? And why does it matter which distribution is being used? Let’s get to it.

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Ubuntu Studio 18.10 To Offer A KDE Plasma Desktop Option

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KDE
Ubuntu

The multimedia-focused Ubuntu Studio Linux distribution has used GNOME since its inception and while that is continuing for now, a sign of a possible shift is coming with Ubuntu Studio 18.10 to offer a KDE Plasma desktop option.

For this next Ubuntu Studio release, the GNOME Shell desktop will be their default environment but they are going to offer a KDE Plasma option -- the first time they have offered an alternate desktop option. They would like to make it an option to select at install-time what desktop is preferred by the user, but due to size/packaging constraints, they may end up offering two separate ISOs.

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Direct/source: Plans for Ubuntu Studio 18.10 – Cosmic Cuttlefish

Pinguy OS 18.04 Beta2

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Ubuntu

I have added Unetbootin and Stacer to the new build.

Unetbootin does work but picking files does not. You have to set the path to the ISO manually.

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Also: Ubuntu 18.10 Planning For GS Connect, Allowing Phone Integration With The Desktop

The Nifty Dozen: 12 cool features in Ubuntu MATE

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu MATE 18.04 Bionic Beaver will hopefully work around its bugs and problems and present a robust, unified, slick desktop to its users. Regardless, there’s no denying the wealth of innovation and fun that’s gone into this product. For a few years, I thought MATE was sort of simmering quietly, and then, bam, it comes back like a horde of Rohan warriors riding to Gondor. Or something.

If you’re looking for an Ubuntu-like experience, Ubuntu MATE comes as close to the original as possible, and it also gives you phenomenal, unprecedented level of flexibility to customize and change your desktop however you feel like. The understated power of Gnome 2. Of course, it’s not all about Unity. On its own, as a classic desktop, Ubuntu MATE comes loaded with interesting features and options that allow you to use the system however you fancy – a classic look or a modern MAC-like look, dock, panels, global menu, themes, you name it. Shake and bake. Time to explore then. Just beware the bugs.

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Also: This Week in Lubuntu Development #5

Ubuntu: 32-bit Elimination and 11 Years of Ubuntu Membership

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Ubuntu
  • 32-bit ARM Is Also On The Chopping Block For Ubuntu

    Not only are developers talking about dropping Ubuntu 32-bit x86 support but the ARMHF support might also be cut as well for 32-bit ARM boards.

    With ARMv8 ushering in 64-bit ARM has been common now for years, Ubuntu developers are also considering dropping the Ubuntu ARM hard-float port for ARMv7 support. This is a tiny bit surprising considering the wide number of 32-bit ARM SBCs out in the wild, including some ARMv7 boards still being peddled by different vendors. But then again it's not too often we see ARM SBCs support Ubuntu releases outside of the LTS cycles: Ubuntu 18.04 will remain available with armhf and by the time of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, hopefully many of these other boards will have been phased out from any production purposes. There are still occasional ARM SBC reference images I come across even using the aging Ubuntu 14.04 and many of the older 32-bit ARM boards currently using 16.04 probably won't see updates to 18.04.

  • 11 years of Ubuntu membership

    It's been 11 years and 1 month since I was awarded with official Ubuntu membership. I will never forget that day: as a kid I had to write about myself on IRC, in front of the Community Council members and answer their questions in a language that was not my primary one. I must confess that I was a bit scared that evening, but once I made it, it felt so good. It felt good not just because of the award itself, but rather because that was the recognition that I did something that mattered. I did something useful that other people could benefit from. And for me, that meant a lot.

System76 vs. The LVFS Firmware Updating Service

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

This week the latest open-source drama was a differing of opinions between Richard Hughes of Red Hat who maintains Fwupd and LVFS for Linux firmware updating from the desktop and that of Linux PC vendor System76.

Richard Hughes volleyed a blog post that recommend not buying System76 hardware for those wanting firmware updates via LVFS (the Linux Vendor Firmware Service). He wrote that post based upon System76 not currently using UEFI UpdateCapsule for BIOS updates, System76 developing a Rust tool to flash the embedded controller, and them rolling out their own firmware update handler that officially targets Ubuntu and Pop!_OS. Richard then encouraged Linux users to buy Dell XPS laptops instead.

Richard's post in full can be read here.

On Friday, System76 responded to those accusations. According to System76, Richard expressed via email that the approach System76 is using for firmware updating likely wouldn't work with LVFS and also their distributing of a proprietary firmware flashing tool likely wouldn't be approved by Red Hat legal and they also found flashing the embedded controler from user-space to be sub-optimal.

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Ubuntu: Crazy Justice, Mir, and Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo

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Ubuntu
  • The developer of Crazy Justice has shown off a quick teaser of it on Ubuntu

    Black Riddles Studio has finally shown Crazy Justice [Official Site] on Ubuntu, although it's only a small teaser of their third-person shooter it has me excited.

    Crazy Justice is the third-person shooter developed by two brothers, which was crowdfunded on Fig where they managed to get $51K in funding. Since the campaign finished, they've hit just shy of $70K thanks to people pre-ordering it.

    They later announced a Battle Royale mode, which has me excited because Linux doesn't really have one currently. You could argue we have stuff with last man standing modes, sure, but they're quite different. Given how popular the BR genre is, it will be sweet to have it on Linux. As a reminder, the Early Access release should hopefully be available before the end of June. Looks like I might be getting an early birthday present this year…

  • Logind Support For Mir Is Getting Closer To Working

    Mir developers have been working on support for systemd's Logind and there is a "mess of a branch" that is nearly functionally complete and could soon be merged.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E10 – Ten Little Ladybugs - Ubuntu Podcast

    This week we’ve been smashing up a bathroom like rock stars. We discuss the Ubuntu 18.04 (Bionic Beaver) LTS release, serve up some command line love and go over your feedback.

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Flatpak 1.0 Linux Application Sandboxing & Distribution Framework Is Almost Here

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Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Is Now Certified on Intel's NUC Mini PCs and IoT Boards

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6 Open Source AI Tools to Know

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Skylake module aces OSADL’s real-time Linux tests

Congatec has joined the Open Source Automation Development Lab, which has certified that the real-time Linux stack for the Skylake Xeon-E3 based Conga-TS170 COM Express module offers “excellent response times.” The Open Source Automation Development Lab (OSADL) has certified Congatec’s implementation of real-time Linux (RTL), and has accepted Congatec as a member. Congatec will continued to collaborate with OSADL to optimize board support for RTL and showcase it in the OSADL test racks, says the company. Read more