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Ubuntu

A Collection Of The Ultimate Web Browsers For Ubuntu

Filed under
Web
Ubuntu

Web browsers are vital if you're going to have any sort of online experience on your computer. There are hundreds of choices out there, as well as the standard browser which will come pre-installed on your computer, but that's often not the best choice, and it can be quite an intimidating task to sift through every dodgy review site on the internet to try and find the right browser for you. Ending up with a Downloads folder filled with installers and a desktop littered with icons isn't what you want or need, so this collection of web browsers for Ubuntu should be able to help you decide on which one you want before you go and download every single browser available on the internet.

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Orange Pi Zero2 is a Tiny Allwinner H6 SBC with HDMI 2.0, USB 3.0, Ethernet & WiFi

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu

It’s always frustrating to see boards with USB 3.0 and Fast Ethernet, since there’s no benefit over USB 2.0 for networked storage. But this is usually to cut costs, and in this case the PCB’s size may have been a problem to accommodate the extra transceiver required for Gigabit Ethernet.

Supported operating systems are said to be Android7.0, Ubuntu, and Debian, but this information is not always correct before launch. The good news is that Orange Pi 3 SBC, also powered by Allwinner H6 processor, is supported in Armbian, albeit only with WIP Debian 10 and Ubuntu 18.04 images, meaning they are suitable for testing, but not necessarily stable.

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Source Code Adventure #1: Ubuntu, Launchpad, and Source DVDs

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Ubuntu

I am currently distributing GNU/Linux in Indonesia. As you know, distributing libre software that is licensed under GNU GPL and such other licenses, requires you to distribute the source code too. A question pops up: where to get source code of a GNU/Linux system along with whole source code repository it possesses? For example, where to get Ubuntu's source code DVD and its source code repository? To answer that question, I decided to make a series of notes regarding my search in source code of popular GNU/Linux distros. Criteria I made are (1) whether a distro provides source CD or not, (2) where the official source code packages repo located, (3) where the raw source codes located, and finally (4) how to get them for end users. I also tried to find (5) mirrors of the source code repo. I am starting here with Ubuntu, of course, and next time I will look at Debian, Fedora, openSUSE, and Trisquel. I hope this article and the next ones will help anybody to understand how important the source code is and ease them to distribute free as in freedom software. Enjoy!

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MINIX NEO S2 USB-C SSD Hub Review in Ubuntu 18.04 with Khadas Edge

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Reviews
Ubuntu

MINIX NEO S1 & S2 USB-C hubs are specifically designed for Apple Macbook, Macbook Air, and Macbook Pro, but since they follow USB-C specifications they should work with compatible devices. You must note your experience may vary, as we’ve seen MINIX NEO S2 “works” with Khadas Edge running Ubuntu 18.04 + XFCE, but stability, at least with regards to driving an extra display may be an issue. An external power supply is almost certainly needed unless you only use the product as a USB-C SSD.

MINIX NEO S1 & S2 can be purchased on various shops including GearBest, GeekBuying, and Amazon starting at respectively $79.99 and $97.99.

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Reading ID Card Data in Ubuntu with EZ100PU Smart Card Reader (Thai ID Edition)

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Ubuntu
HowTos

I was asked help with configuring a smart card reader on a government computer running Windows 7, but this made me wonder what would happen if I connected the card reader to my Ubuntu laptop and whether I’d be able to read content from a Thai ID card.

It’s a FAST ID EZ100PU smart card reader compliant with ISO7816 standard. That’s the product page of the specific model, but a search for EZ100PU only reveals the manufacturer may be InfoThink Technology based on Taiwan.

The USB smart card reader comes with a CD that includes drivers for Windows, Linux, Mac OS, and Android, as well as an SDK with a demo program and sample code in C++, Visual Basic .NET, and C#. As we’ll see further below, the Linux driver is not needed as it works out of the box.

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Call for testing: Ubuntu Touch OTA-10

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Ubuntu

I'm happy to announce that we would like your help to test OTA-10! OTA-10 is slated to release on Wednesday, August 14, 2019. Until then, we need to make sure it's ready to go!

We want to ensure that every release we ship is better than the previous, so we're looking to our entire community to help us with QA (Quality Assurance) of OTA-10.

We've prepared a GitHub Project for OTA-10 QA which lists the issues we'd like your feedback on. The QA column lists issues which do not have complete test results. The Done column lists issues which, thanks to our efforts here, are confirmed to be fixed. The In Progress column lists issues which are not fixed, or the fix introduces a severe negative side effect. The goal at the end of this is to have every issue in the Done column.

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Also: Ubuntu Touch OTA-10 Is Now Available For Testing

An Improved Yaru Theme is Being Prepped for Ubuntu 19.10

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Ubuntu

The upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 release will — if all goes to plan — feature an improved version of the Yaru GTK theme, and in this post we take a look at some of the changes the revamp makes.

Conscious of the continued debate as to whether Linux distros should “theme” applications designed for upstream defaults (i.e., the Adwaita GTK theme) Yaru’s development crew have opted to more closely align their fork with the latest upstream versions.

“We tried to keep as much design as possible while aiming for minimum diff (yaru was always based on the upstream themes, but the tweaks went a bit out of scope lately and it became hard to keep track of the upstream changes,” Frederik Feichtmeier explains.

What this means in practice is a little hard to say because, at the time of writing, the “new” version of theme is not available for testing in Eoan (though it can be built from source, but hey: i’m lazy).

That said there are a couple of low-res screenshots which attempt to showcase the improved Yaru theme, and these do sport a few noticeable, if minor, differences.

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Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS Is Out with Linux Kernel 5.0 from Ubuntu 19.04, Download Now

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Coming six months after the Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS release, which shipped with the hardware enablement (HWE) kernel from the not deprecated Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) operating system, Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS here as the third point release in the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) series with up-to-date components.

Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS includes all the latest software and security fixes that have been published on the official repositories of the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS release since February 14th, 2019, when Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS hit the streets. It also ships with updated kernel and graphics stacks from Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo), such as Linux kernel 5.0.

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Ubuntu 19.10 to Support ZFS on Root as an Experimental Option in the Installer

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) will be the next major release of the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system, and also a testbed for Canonical to implement new features and see if they prove to be useful to the community for upcoming LTS (Long Term Support) releases, such as next year's Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.

One of these new features coming to the Ubuntu 19.10 release this fall is an experimental option implemented in the graphical installer to let users create a root file system formatted with the ZFS file system. But Canonical warns users that they should not use it on a production machine.

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Also: Canonical Confirms Their Experimental ZFS Plans For The Ubuntu 19.10 Desktop

Enhancing our ZFS support on Ubuntu 19.10 – an introduction

Canonical/Ubuntu: Launchpad, Declarative vs Imperative, Ubuntu Server

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Launchpad news, March 2019 – July 2019

    Here’s a brief changelog of what we’ve been up to since our last general update.

  • Declarative vs Imperative: DevOps done right

    Deciding whether to automate workloads, while designing your ICT infrastructure, is trivial. It’s 2019 and automation is everywhere around. However, deciding which DevOps paradigm to choose and which tool to use, may not be that obvious. In order to assist you with the ‘declarative vs imperative’ decision-making process, this blog briefly introduces existing DevOps paradigms, presents the main differences between them and outlines the key benefits of using declarative DevOps with charms.

    [...]

    All right, all of that sounds great, but where is the ‘magic’ coming from? Imagine pieces of code which contain all necessary instructions to deploy and configure applications. This includes a collection of scripts and metadata, such as configuration file templates. Such pieces of software, called charms, provide the ‘magic’ described. The users no longer have to think about low-level instructions. This logic is already implemented in the charms. Instead they can focus on shaping the applications being deployed and modelling the entire deployment by relating one application with others. For example, should the database being deployed listen on a different port than the default one?. Or how many concurrent connections should it allow? All the user has to do is to declare the ultimate state.

  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 06 August 2019

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team.

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