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Ubuntu

Why Canonical views the Snap ecosystem as a compelling distribution-agnostic solution

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Ubuntu

For roughly two decades, Linux distributions have been the first choice for servers. Hardware support for Linux on the desktop has historically been an encumbrance to widespread adoption, though support for modern hardware on modern distributions has progressed such that most hardware is detected and configured correctly upon installation.

With these advances in hardware support, the last significant challenge users face when switching from Windows or Mac to a Linux distribution is app distribution and installation. While distribution-provided repositories are useful for most open source software, the release model of distributions such as Ubuntu or Fedora lock in users to a major version for programs for the duration of a particular release.

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Ubuntu and Debian: Stephan Fabel, DebConf, Debian's Kotlin and MATE 1.22

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Open Source: Where is it going? – Global Banking & Finance Review

    By Stephan Fabel, Director of Product at Canonical – the publisher of Ubuntu.

  • Debian's DebConf 19 Slides & Video Presentations

    Debian's annual developer conference, DebConf, wrapped up last week in Curitiba, Brasil. The slide decks and video recordings for many of those presentations are now available.

    DebConf 19 featured talks ranging from Spectre/Meltdown concerns to Debian containers and cloud, the state of RDMA support within Debian, music and games, and a variety of other topics.

    There is a Git repository collecting the slides from DebConf 2019 but sadly many of the talks do not have their material uploaded yet.

  • Debian GSoC Kotlin project blog: Packaging Dependencies Part 2; and plan on how to.

    Hey all, I had my exams during weeks 8 ad 9 so I couldn't update my blog nor get much accomplished; but last week was completely free so I managed to finish packaging all the dependencies from pacakging dependencies part 1. Since some of you may not remember how I planned to tackle pacakging dependencies I'll mention it here one more time.

    "I split this task into two sub tasks that can be done independently. The 2 subtasks are as follows:
    ->part 1: make the entire project build successfully without :buildSrc:prepare-deps:intellij-sdk:build
    --->part1.1:package these dependencies
    ->part 2: package the dependencies in :buildSrc:prepare-deps:intellij-sdk:build ; i.e try to recreate whatever is in it."

    This is taken from my last blog which was specifically on packaging dependencies in part 1. Now I am happy to tell all of you that packaging dependencies for part 1 is now complete and all the needed pacakges are either in the new queue or already in sid archive as of 04 August 2019. I would like to thank ebourg, seamlik and andrewsh for helping me with this.

  • MATE 1.22 landed in Debian unstable

    Last week, I did a bundle upload of (nearly) all MATE 1.22 related components to Debian unstable. Packages should have been built by now for most of the 24 architectures supported by Debian (I just fixed an FTBFS of mate-settings-daemon on non-Linux host archs). The current/latest build status can be viewed on the DDPO page of the Debian+Ubuntu MATE Packaging Team [1].

Why I Switched From Ubuntu to Manjaro Linux

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Linux
Ubuntu

I still rate Ubuntu very highly, and I have great respect for Canonical. Over in the corporate world, no one comes close to the success Red Hat has had with promoting Linux as a serious enterprise infrastructure tool. You could make the same argument for Canonical, and its success with making Linux accessible for newcomers to the Linux desktop.

A lot of people who use Linux for the first time stick a toe in the water with Ubuntu. Once they’ve found their feet and get a bit of experience, some people move on to other distributions. I’ve heard the same story many times, both in-person and online. People tell me they’re on a particular distribution—Fedora, Debian, you name it, I’ve heard it—but they started on Ubuntu. If their current distribution had been their first foray into Linux, they doubt they would have stuck with it. That’s a massively important role for Ubuntu to play.

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Ubuntu-powered AI computers tap Jetson TX2 and Nano modules

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Ubuntu

Advantech’s MIC-720AI and MIC-710IVA edge-AI computers run Ubuntu on Nvidia Jetson TX2 and Nano modules, respectively. The compact, rugged MIC-720AI has a single PoE port while the MIC-710IVA NVR system has 8x PoE ports.

At the 2019 Nvidia GPU Technology Conference in late May, Advantech previewed three Nvidia Jetson-based, “MIC” branded edge AI solutions for smart city, transportation, and manufacturing applications. More recently, product pages have appeared for two of these Linux-driven computers: the Jetson TX2 powered MIC-720AI and the Jetson Nano based MIC-710IVA AI Network Video Recorder. The promised MIC-730AI has yet to be documented, but we have an image — it’s in the middle of the group shot below.

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Canonical Releases Linux 5.0 Kernel (HWE) Security Update for Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS

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Security
Ubuntu

Canonical released today a new Linux kernel security update, this time for users of the Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS operating system using the Linux 5.0 HWE (Hardware Enablement) kernel from Ubuntu 19.04.

This Linux Hardware Enablement (HWE) kernel from Ubuntu 19.04 for Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS includes the same fixes for four security flaws that Canonical added in the lastest kernel for Ubuntu 19.04 last week, including an integer overflow (CVE-2019-11487) discovered in Linux kernel, which could lead to use-after-free issues as local attackers were able to use the exploit to execute arbitrary code or cause a denial of service (system crash).

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Digital signage platform Xibo launches as a snap

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Ubuntu

Xibo provides a comprehensive suite of digital signage products, with its Content Management System (CMS) at the heart of this experience-led offering. Xibo for Linux is completely free and natively built for the Xibo CMS, which can be installed on servers or combined with Xibo cloud hosting.

Snaps are containerised software packages designed to work across cloud, desktop, and IoT devices. They work natively on the most popular Linux distributions and feature automatic update and rollback functionality, enhanced security, and greater flexibility for developers.

Utilising snaps allows Xibo to offer a simple, dependency-free installation, as well as the potential for feature enhancements in future offerings, and it works across many Linux distributions. It can be accessed worldwide, and when combined with Xibo in the Cloud, customers can choose whether to host in the UK, Germany, Singapore, Australia or the USA to ensure their content is kept close to them.

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Linux Mint vs Ubuntu Comparison

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu and Linux Mint for legal reasons do not distribute by default all the multimedia codecs that we would like. However, in Ubuntu using the terminal we can install the package ubuntu-restricted-extras where are the Flash plugin, Microsoft fonts, and other things.

In Linux Mint we have that package, but we also have a more specialized one called codecs-multimedia that we can install from the main menu of the distribution.

Conclusion

Ubuntu and Linux Mint are quite mature Linux distributions with clear development goals and lines. Both offer the opportunity to have a nice, stable system with a great capacity to manage programs.

In this post, we have explained the main differences between the two, however, internally there are still many more. It’s up to you to know which one you like best.

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Ubuntu Touch Q&A 55

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Ubuntu

Some of the problems we have had with the new adaptations to UT are caused by apps that do not function properly with Mir. There are conflicts with work done earlier by Canonical. The approach we have taken now is that if it does not work as we want, we kill the app. iOS and Android also kill apps in similar situations, so this is pretty normal practice. It avoids problems that follow when apps don’t behave correctly. The inability to close apps while not in focus has now been fixed.

There needs to be a major refactoring in qtMir and Unity8. It general though, apps take a very complicated route when handled by Mir, so it is not easy to solve problems and the refresh needed will have to be big.

Nevertheless, with those two changes we are very close to the point where Edge channel can be merged into Development channel.

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Also: UBports Is Working On Ubuntu Touch OTA-10

Ubuntu in the Largest Surveillance Host and 'Store' Experience

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Ubuntu
  • Canonical Announces Amazon EC2 On-Demand Hibernation for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

    Canonical and AWS announced today the public availability of on-demand Amazon EC2 Hibernation support for the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS operating system on AWS (Amazon Web Services).

    As one can imagine, the Amazon EC2 On-Demand Hibernation functionality lets users start up Amazon EC2 instances, configure them to their needs, hibernate them, and then launch them again whenever they want with all the running apps in the last state before they were put to sleep.

    With Amazon EC2 On-Demand Hibernation there's no need to rebuild the memory footprint of your apps, and it also lets you maintain a fleet of pre-warmed Amazon EC2 instances that may increase your productivity without the need to modify any of your existing applications in the cloud.

  • Amazon EC2 On-Demand Hibernation for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS now available

    AWS and Canonical today announce the public release of Amazon EC2 Hibernation support for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

    Amazon EC2 Hibernation gives you the ability to launch Amazon EC2 instances, set them up as desired, hibernate them, and then quickly bring them back to life when you need them. Applications pick up exactly where they left off instead of rebuilding their memory footprint. Using hibernate, you can maintain a fleet of pre-warmed instances that can get to a productive state faster, and you can do this without modifying your existing applications.

  • A shift to the Linux app store experience

    Linux software developers historically have faced a number of challenges including fragmentation, distribution complexity and a lack of metrics into the success of their applications. Once an application is built, the journey does not end there – for companies and individual developers creating apps, thought needs to be given to promoting their software for maximum visibility, usage and customer experience.

Canonical Releases New Linux Kernel Live Patch for Ubuntu 18.04 and 16.04 LTS

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Linux
Security
Ubuntu

Coming hot on the heels of the last Linux kernel security updates released by Canonical last week for all supported Ubuntu Linux releases, this new kernel live patch is now available for users of the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating systems who use the Canonical Livepatch Service to apply rebootless kernel updates.

It fixes five security issues, including a race condition (CVE-2019-11815), which could lead to a use-after-free, in Linux kernel's RDS (Reliable Datagram Sockets) protocol implementation that may allow a local attacker to crash the system or execute arbitrary code, as well as a flaw (CVE-2019-2054) affecting ARM CPUs, which lets local attackers to bypass seccomp restrictions.

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