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Manjaro Snaps Collaboration With Ubuntu and More News About Ubuntu

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Ubuntu
  • Manjaro, snaps and the spirit of collaboration

    Linux distributions are all about freedom of choice for the end-user. However, there is a natural element of competition too. So, why did Philip Müller, one of the founders of the Manjaro distribution, come to the 2019 Snapcraft Summit in Montreal?

    There are several good reasons, according to Philip. First, he says, “Manjaro and Ubuntu have similar goals of making software simple to install, for example, by using snaps. Second, Snapcraft has evolved to embrace different Linux distributions, thanks to a deliberate decision by Canonical.” Philip also points to the growing maturity of the Snap Store and its reach extending further than just Ubuntu users. Third, Philip finds that “the Summit is good for networking with other projects and finding out how they fit into the Linux ecosystem.”

    Manjaro is based on Arch and releases new versions about twice a year since the launch in 2011. Primarily targeted at Linux beginners and intermediates, Manjaro does also attract more knowledgeable users depending on their needs. Packaging decisions are guided by what users want, which explains Manjaro’s growing interest in snaps – especially given the fact that Manjaro has three editions to support and many community editions. For the main ones, Philip and team decide on what core apps are delivered and if snapd is one of those then he sees an increased likelihood of the community editions following suit. As confirmed during the Summit, Philip states that “Snap Store access will be available on KDE, XFCE and GNOME editions of Manjaro.”

    In his opinion, “open source needs a new, collaborative model, as opposed to the secrecy of closed source. Collaboration helps get things done faster and allows a stronger focus on the end product and value to users.” In summary, if a user continues to use Manjaro as their operating system, the addition of snaps offers an easy additional way to install more software for them.

  • Manjaro Moving Ahead With Snap Support, Bundling Proprietary FreeOffice

    Arch-based Linux distribution Manjaro has issued their newest testing update with some controversial changes.

    Manjaro is moving ahead with their support of Snap packages spearheaded by Ubuntu/Canonical. Xfce, GNOME, and KDE spins of Manjaro will ship with fpakman for managing of both Snaps and Flatpaks on the system. Fpakman is a GUI for Flatpak/Snap management as an alternative to GNOME Software or KDE Discover.

  • The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 589

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 589 for the week of July 21 – 27, 2019.

Lubuntu 18.10 End of Life and Current Support Statuses

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Ubuntu

Lubuntu 18.10, our first release with LXQt, has reached End of Life as of July 18, 2019. This means that no further security updates or bugfixes will be released. We highly recommend that you update to 19.04 as soon as possible if you are still running Lubuntu 18.10.

The only currently-supported releases of Lubuntu today are 18.04, with LXDE, and 19.04, with LXQt. All other releases of Lubuntu are considered unsupported, and will not receive any further updates from the Lubuntu team.

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Canonical Outs New Linux Kernel Security Updates for Ubuntu 19.04 and 18.04 LTS

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Ubuntu

Canonical released new Linux kernel security updates for Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo) and Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system series to address various security vulnerabilities.
The new security updates are here to address a race condition (CVE-2019-11599) in Linux kernel when performing core dumps, and an integer overflow (CVE-2019-11487) when referencing counting pages. Both issues affect only Ubuntu 19.04 systems and could allow a local attacker to crash the system by causing a denial of service (DoS attack) or possibly execute arbitrary code.

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BT will use Ubuntu and OpenStack to power 5G transformation

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Ubuntu

In one of Canonical's most significant deals ever, BT, formerly British Telecom, announced it would use Ubuntu Linux and OpenStack cloud to bring 5G to its the UK and worldwide customers.

Specifically, BT announces it would use Canonical's Charmed OpenStack on Ubuntu as a key component of its next-generation 5G Core. In addition, Canonical will provide the open-source virtual infrastructure manager (VIM) as part of BT's Network Function Virtualisation (NFV) program. With this open-source cloud approach, BT can delivery the capacity it needs to meet 5G's demand for fast, ever-changing network connections.

VIM is being deployed using Canonical's Juju, and Charms DevOps tools Metal-as-a-Service (MaaS) will be used as the cloud provisioning tool. BT's 5G Core will be backed by Ubuntu Advantage for Infrastructure for the ongoing management and support of operations. The full 5G Core will first be used for 5G, but eventually, it will be used to transform all of BT's networking offerings --fixed, mobile and Wi-Fi--into a single, seamless customer experience.

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Linux Mint 19.2 "Tina" Enters Beta, Based on Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS and Linux 4.15

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Linux
Ubuntu

Available in Cinnamon, MATE and Xfce editions, the Linux Mint 19.2 "Tina" beta release is now available for public testing to give the community an early taste of what to expect from the final release early this fall. As expected, Linux Mint 19.2 will be based on the Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system and the Linux 4.15 kernel.

Linux Mint 19.2 beta features the Cinnamon 4.2, MATE 1.22, and Xfce 4.12 desktop environments, and will receive security and software updates until year 2023. It brings various enhancements like better Linux kernel support and lots of significant improvements in Update Manager, a new look and feel for System Reports, as well as minor changes to Software Manager and Software Sources tools.

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Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) Reached End of Life, Upgrade to Ubuntu 19.04

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Ubuntu

As reported earlier this month, when we gave users a two-week advance notice, the Ubuntu 18.10 operating system reached end of life on July 18th, 2019, which means that it will no longer receive security and software updates. Canonical terminated support for Ubuntu 18.10, urging users to upgrade to Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo).

Dubbed Cosmic Cuttlefish by Canonical's CEO Mark Shuttleworth, the Ubuntu 18.10 operating system was released last year on October 18th featuring the GNOME 3.30 desktop environment by default with a fresh new look and feel based on the in-house developed Yaru theme, formerly Communitheme. The system was using the Linux 4.18 kernel series.

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BT turns to Canonical Ubuntu to enable next generation 5G Cloud Core

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Ubuntu

Today, Canonical announces it’s Charmed OpenStack on Ubuntu has been selected by BT as a key component of its next generation 5G Core. Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, will provide the open source virtual infrastructure manager (VIM) as part of BT’s Network Function Virtualisation (NFV) program, and the transition to a cloud-based Core network.

This open source cloud-based approach will ensure that BT can quickly deploy new services, and increase capacity to stay ahead of customer demand driven by 5G and FTTP. Canonical’s OpenStack architecture will also facilitate the delivery of BT’s full 5G Core network.

Openstack cloud software will enable the separation of network hardware and software, turning Core network components into software applications, meaning they can be updated faster with continuous integration and development. This separation allows different network applications to share the same hardware across data centres, making the network more resilient and scalable when additional capacity is needed. The speed at which software can be updated compared to replacing core network equipment will lead to a new way of working for the development of 5G services where BT can build new services in weeks and deploy in days.

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Debian and Ubuntu: Deepin 15.11, Molly de Blanc, Debconf 19 and Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Deepin 15.11 Released, This is What’s New

    A new version of the Deepin Linux distribution is now available to download — and in this post we give you a quick overview of what’s changed.

    Made by a Chinese company of the same name, Deepin is a high-gloss Linux distro for the desktop. It boasts the bespoke ‘Deepin desktop environment’, a bevy of home-grown apps, and ships with a boatload of visual flair.

    While Deepin is primarily targeted at Chinese-speaking users its slick UI has international appeal, as evidenced by the distro’s increasing popularity on sites like Distrowatch.

    And the latest release looks set to cement that appeal.

  • Molly de Blanc: Free software activities (June 2019)

    I know this is almost a month late, but I am sharing it nonetheless. My June was dominated by my professional and personal life, leaving little time for expansive free software activities. I’ll write a little more in my OSI report for June.

  • Debconf 19 photos

    The main feed for my photos from Debconf 19 in Curitiba, Brazil is currently in my GPhoto album. I will later also sync it to Debconf git share.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 588

Community Snapcrafter on MicroK8s, summits and the evolving nature of snaps

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Ubuntu

In January 2018, Dan Llewellyn joined his first Snapcraft Summit in Seattle in his role as a community Snapcrafter. At that event, we discussed his views on everything snap related from most requested snaps, new feature requests and popular discussion topics. Since then, snaps has grown across every metric and seen numerous new high profile snaps enter the store including Microsoft Visual Studio Code, a suite from JetBrains, Opera and more. We took the opportunity at the most recent Snapcraft Summit in Montreal to get Dan’s insider perspective 18 months on.

“Snaps are reaching ubiquity. People using or building snaps no longer think of themselves as early adopters, but more adhering to the status quo,” Dan observes. There has been a “natural progression” in the growth trajectory that snaps have experienced. Dan believes part of this is driven by developers seeing the likes of Microsoft, Amazon and Google publishing software in the Snap Store. Similarly, Dan has noticed an increase in commercial interest in the format compared to individual developers in the earlier days.

Dan also suggests two additional factors for the increased adoption. Firstly, the availability in the Ubuntu store with desktop users being served snaps first over other formats. Secondly, the crossover with the Docker container story – users like the throwaway nature. They can do their work, delete and start again with the next build.

Such trends are evident in the nature of the forum conversation as well with less discussion around how to build snaps and far more around the management of existing snaps. He has also seen less around the automatic update feature which he believes is due to the message resonating and it is now a given. “People are comfortable with the feature and expect automatic updates when originally they may have been sceptical if it would work on a desktop or IoT device,” Dan adds. Talking of IoT, Dan has seen an uplift in topics around the internet of things given the benefits snaps can bring to embedded devices.

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Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Bootstrappable Debian BoF

    Greetings from DebConf 19 in Curitiba! Just a quick reminder that I will run a Bootstrappable Debian BoF on Tuesday 23rd, at 13.30 Brasilia time (which is 16.30 UTC, if I am not mistaken). If you are curious about bootstrappability in Debian, why do we want it and where we are right now, you are welcome to come in person if you are at DebCon or to follow the streaming.

  • Candy Tsai: Outreachy Week 6 – Week 7: Getting Code Merge

    You can’t overhear what others are doing or learn something about your colleagues through gossip over lunch break when working remotely. So after being stuck for quite a bit, terceiro suggested that we try pair programming.

    After our first remote pair programming session, I think there should be no difference in pair programming in person. We shared the same terminal, looked at the same code and discussed just like people standing side by side.

    Through our pair programming session, I found out that I had a bad habit. I didn’t run tests on my code that often, so when I had failing tests that didn’t fail before, I spent more time debugging than I should have. Pair programming gave insight to how others work and I think little improvements go a long way.

  • about your wiki page on I/O schedulers and BFQ
    Hi,
    this is basically to report outdated statements in your wiki page on
    I/O schedulers [1].
    
    The main problematic statement is that BFQ "...  is not ideal for
    devices with slow CPUs or high throughput I/O devices" because too
    heavy.  BFQ is definitely more sophisticated than any of the other I/O
    schedulers.  We have designed it that way to provide an incomparably
    better service quality, at a very low overhead.  As reported in [2],
    the execution time of BFQ on an old laptop CPU is 0.6 us per I/O
    event, against 0.2 us for mq-deadline (which is the lightest Linux I/O
    scheduler).
    
    To put these figures into context, BFQ proved to be so good for
    "devices with slow CPUs" that, e.g., Chromium OS migrated to BFQ a few
    months ago.  In particular, Google crew got convinced by a demo [3] I
    made for them, on one of the cheapest and slowest Chromebook on the
    market.  In the demo, a fast download is performed.  Without BFQ, the
    download makes the device completely unresponsive.  With BFQ, the
    device remains as responsive as if it was totally idle.
    
    As for the other part of the statement, "...  not ideal for ...  high
    throughput I/O devices", a few days ago I ran benchmarks (on Ubuntu)
    also with one of the fastest consumer-grade NVMe SSDs: a Samsung SSD
    970 PRO.  Results [4] can be summarized as follows.  Throughput with
    BFQ is about the same as with the other I/O schedulers (it couldn't be
    higher, because this kind of drives just wants the scheduler to stay
    as aside as possible, when it comes to throughput).  But, in the
    presence of writes as background workload, start-up times with BFQ are
    at least 16 times as low as with the other I/O schedulers.  In
    absolute terms, gnome-terminal starts in ~1.8 seconds with BFQ, while
    it takes at least 28.7 (!) seconds with the other I/O schedulers.
    Finally, only with BFQ, no frame gets lost in video-playing
    benchmarks.
    
    BFQ then provides other important benefits, such as from 5x to 10X
    throughput boost in multi-client server workloads [5].
    
    So, is there any chance that the outdated/wrong information on your
    wiki page [1] gets updated somehow?  If I may, I'd be glad to update
    it myself, after providing you with all the results you may ask.
    
    In addition, why doesn't Ubuntu too consider switching to BFQ as
    default I/O scheduler, for all drives that BFQ supports (namely all
    drives with a maximum speed not above ~500 KIOPS)?
    
    Looking forward to your feedback,
    Paolo
    
    
  • Should Ubuntu Use The BFQ I/O Scheduler?

    The BFQ I/O scheduler is working out fairly well these days as shown in our benchmarks. The Budget Fair Queueing scheduler supports both throughput and low-latency modes while working particularly well for consumer-grade hardware. Should the Ubuntu desktop be using BFQ by default?

    [...]

    But in addition to wanting to correct that Wiki information, Paolo pops the question of why doesn't Ubuntu switch to BFQ as the default I/O scheduler for supported drives. Though as of yet, no Ubuntu kernel developers have yet commented on the prospect of switching to BFQ.

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