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Ubuntu

Video: Try a free operating system

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Ubuntu

CNET's Tom Merritt shows you how to give Ubuntu Linux a run on your own computer without installing a thing. View Here.

Is Ubuntu Linux a Sensible Alternative for Mac Users?

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Ubuntu

A friend of mine phoned to ask if I thought he should install Ubuntu Linux on his Macs - a 1.33 GHz G4 iBook currently running OS X 10.4 "Tiger" and a 1.25 GHz Power Mac G4 tower with OS X 10.3 "Panther" installed. Does Ubuntu Linux make any sense for Macintosh users?

Is Ubuntu CE Needed?

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Ubuntu

If we take a look at the mission statement on the Ubuntu Christian Edition homepage, it states "To bring the power of Ubuntu Linux, combined with the best Open Source Christian software, to the world". What bothers me about this is that the word "Christian" is exploited while making this distro.

Give Linux one more chance -- this time you won't regret it

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Ubuntu

If you have an old PC lying around (or even a brand new one), this may be the time to give Linux another try. Yes, I know, you expect Linux, the free operating system developed by volunteers worldwide, to be nerdy and hard to use.

Jeff Waugh on Ubuntu: Community Building for Human Beings

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Ubuntu

At the 2006 Open Source Convention, Jeff Waugh, who works on Ubuntu business and community development as an employee of Canonical, describes the process by which Ubuntu's team went about creating a community with shared values and vision.

Something Out of Nothing - Ubuntu Dapper Drake (6.06 LTS) on a Packard Bell iMedia 1307

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Ubuntu

I don’t think I’ve ever seen a set of desktop computers in a more wretched state than those I saw this morning. It was going to be something of a miracle if they started up; however they did. Still, the result was not particularly pleasing. I decided to install and see if Linux could bring something as wretched as this back to life.

Mark Shuttleworth: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly

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Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth is polishing his image: Reuter's has a story which says «Millionaire cosmonaut takes on Microsoft», and Mark's own blog addresses the Debian/Ubuntu conflictual relationship: «Conflicting goals create tension in communities». I couldn't possibly trust these sayings.

Xgl and Compiz bling for Dapper

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Ubuntu
HowTos

By now, if you haven't seen Compiz and Xgl in action, you probably have heard of it. You may even be wanting to set it up yourself. If so, this guide is here for you.

Millionaire cosmonaut takes on Microsoft

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Ubuntu

South African magnate Mark Shuttleworth has already conquered space. Now he's set his sights on cyberspace where he hopes to challenge Microsoft.

Mark Shuttleworth: Conflicting goals create tension in communities

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Ubuntu

Matthew Garrett expressed frustration with Debian recently, in a blog post that’s become rather famous. I’m of the opinion that Ubuntu could not exist without Debian. So it’s absolutely my intention to see that Ubuntu is a constructive part of the broader Debian landscape.

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Today in Techrights

Security Leftovers

  • One-stop counterfeit certificate shops for all your malware-signing needs

    The Stuxnet worm that targeted Iran's nuclear program almost a decade ago was a watershed piece of malware for a variety of reasons. Chief among them, its use of cryptographic certificates belonging to legitimate companies to falsely vouch for the trustworthiness of the malware. Last year, we learned that fraudulently signed malware was more widespread than previously believed. On Thursday, researchers unveiled one possible reason: underground services that since 2011 have sold counterfeit signing credentials that are unique to each buyer.

  • How did OurMine hackers use DNS poisoning to attack WikiLeaks? [Ed: False. They did not attack Wikileaks; they attacked the DNS servers/framework. The corporate media misreported this at the time.
    The OurMine hacking group recently used DNS poisoning to attack WikiLeaks and take over its web address. Learn how this attack was performed from expert Nick Lewis.
  • Intel didn't give government advance notice on chip flaws

    Google researchers informed Intel of flaws in its chips in June. The company explained in its own letter to lawmakers that it left up to Intel informing the government of the flaws.

    Intel said that it did not notify the government at the time because it had “no indication of any exploitation by malicious actors,” and wanted to keep knowledge of the breach limited while it and other companies worked to patch the issue.

    The company let some Chinese technology companies know about the vulnerabilities, which government officials fear may mean the information was passed along to the Chinese government, according to The Wall Street Journal.

  • Intel hid CPU bugs info from govt 'until public disclosure'

    As iTWire reported recently, Intel faces a total of 33 lawsuits over the two flaws. Additionally, the Boston law firm of Block & Leviton is preparing a class action lawsuit against Intel chief executive Brian Krzanich for allegedly selling a vast majority of his Intel stock after the company was notified of the two security flaws and before they became public.

  • Intel did not tell U.S. cyber officials about chip flaws until made public [iophk: "yeah right"]

    Current and former U.S. government officials have raised concerns that the government was not informed of the flaws before they became public because the flaws potentially held national security implications. Intel said it did not think the flaws needed to be shared with U.S. authorities as hackers [sic] had not exploited the vulnerabilities.

  • LA Times serving cryptocurrency mining script [iophk: "JS"]

    The S3 bucket used by the LA Times is apparently world-writable and an ethical hacker [sic] appears to have left a warning in the repository, warning of possible misuse and asking the owner to secure the bucket.

  • Facebook's Mandatory Malware Scan Is an Intrusive Mess

    When an Oregon science fiction writer named Charity tried to log onto Facebook on February 11, she found herself completely locked out of her account. A message appeared saying she needed to download Facebook’s malware scanner if she wanted to get back in. Charity couldn’t use Facebook until she completed the scan, but the file the company provided was for a Windows device—Charity uses a Mac.

  • Tinder plugs flaw that enabled account takeover using just a phone number

    As Tinder uses Facebook profile pics for its users to lure in a mate or several, the 'dating' app is somewhat tied to the social network. When a swipe-hungry Tinder user comes to login to their account they can either do so via Facebook or use their mobile number.

  • `

Android Leftovers

Report from Debian SnowCamp and a Look at Solyd XK, a Debian-Based Distribution

  • Report from Debian SnowCamp: day 1
  • Report from Debian SnowCamp: day 2
    Of course, we’re still sorely lacking volunteers who would really care about mentors.debian.net; the codebase is a pile of hacks upon hacks upon hacks, all relying on an old version of a deprecated Python web framework. A few attempts have been made at a smooth transition to a more recent framework, without really panning out, mostly for lack of time on the part of the people running the service. I’m still convinced things should restart from scratch, but I don’t currently have the energy or time to drive it… Ugh.
  • Installing Solyd XK, a Debian based Linux distribution : Cooking With Linux
    It's time for some more "Cooking With Linux" without a net, meaning the video you are about to watch was recorded live. Today, I'm going to install a new Linux distribution (new to me, anyhow) called Solyd XK.