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Ubuntu

Canonical Shifts Its Fiscal Year Ahead Of Likely IPO

Filed under
Ubuntu

You have likely heard by now about Ubuntu maker Canonical planning to do an initial public offering (IPO) at some point in the not too distant future to become a publicly-traded company. The latest sign of that is Canonical has now shifted its corporate calendar.

Rather than ending its accounting period now on 31 March of each year, Canonical is shifting that to align with the end of each calendar year (31 December). 31 March tends to be the end of fiscal years for UK-based organizations. This change may indicate a desire of Canonical to more likely list on one of the US-based stock exchanges rather than London, but others may have differing hypothesis over the change.

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Canonical Releases Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Kernel Security Update for Raspberry Pi 2

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Earlier this week, Canonical released an important kernel security update for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, as well as other supported Ubuntu releases like Ubuntu 17.10, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, to address various vulnerabilities affecting the kernel packages for 64-bit machines, Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Google Cloud Platform (GCP) systems, and cloud environments.

Now, the same kernel patch that was made available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS users on 64-bit, AWS, GCP, and cloud environments is now available for Raspberry Pi 2 devices too, fixing an issue (CVE-2018-1092) in Linux kernel's EXT4 file system implementation discovered by Wen Xu, which could allow an attacker to crash the affected system by mounting a specially crafted EXT4 file system.

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Canonical Cuts Its Own Path To Put Linux In The Cloud

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
Ubuntu

Linux has gradually grown in importance along with the Internet and now the hyperscalers that define the next generation of experience on that global network. Most of the software running at the hyperscalers – with the exception of Microsoft, of course, is built upon Linux and other open source technologies. In turn, this means that Linux and open source have started to become more important in the enterprise arena, as trends such as cloud computing and large scale data analytics drove the need for similar technologies in the corporate datacenter.

Adapting the collection of open source packages that comprise a typical Linux build and making it suitable for enterprise consumption has led to carefully curated distributions that emphasise reliability and stability, plus paid technical support services and maintenance updates. These are typified by Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES), distributions that have a long product lifecycle of ten years and thirteen years, respectively.

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LTE-equipped automotive gateway runs Ubuntu on Bay Trail

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

Kontron’s rugged “EvoTrac G102” is an in-vehicle cellular gateway that runs Ubuntu on a quad-core Atom E3845, and offers 64GB eMMC, GbE, CAN, 2x USB, and a 3G/4G module with GPS.

Kontron unveiled the EvoTrac G102 last month, and earlier this month announced that it will act as the control box for Hyliion’s 6X4HE “intelligent electric hybrid system for Class 8 trucks and trailers.” The 6X4HE provides regenerative braking design to capture power for fuel savings of up to 30 percent,” says Kontron.

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Also: GPD Pocket 2 Launches This Summer with a Faster Processor

Canonical on So-called 'Private Cloud'

Filed under
Server
Ubuntu
  • 451 Research benchmarks public and private infrastructure cost

    451 Research’s latest report, ‘Busting the myth of private cloud economics ’, found that Canonical’s managed private OpenStack offering, BootStack, delivers private cloud with a TCO that matches public clouds. For multi-cloud operations, enterprise can benefit from a cost effective infrastructure by combining competitive public cloud services with Canonical’s managed private OpenStack cloud on-premise.

  • Private Cloud May Be the Best Bet: Report

    News flash: Private cloud economics can offer more cost efficiency than public cloud pricing structures.

    Private (or on-premises) cloud solutions can be more cost-effective than public cloud options, according to "Busting the Myths of Private Cloud Economics," a report 451 Research and Canonical released Wednesday. That conclusion counters the notion that public cloud platforms traditionally are more cost-efficient than private infrastructures.

    Half of the enterprise IT decision-makers who participated in the study identified cost as the No. 1 pain point associated with the public cloud. Forty percent mentioned cost-savings as a key driver of cloud migration.

    "We understand that people are looking for more cost-effective infrastructure. This was not necessarily news to us," said Mark Baker, program director at Canonical.

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Users Can Now Install Mesa 18.1.1 to Improve Their Linux Gaming

Filed under
Ubuntu

Implementing OpenGL 3.1 with ARB_compatibility on RadeonSI, r600, NV50, NVC0, Softpipe, LLVMpipe, and SVGA graphics drivers, the Mesa 18.1 graphics stack series debuted on May 18, 2018, with support for new OpenGL extensions, including GL_EXT_semaphore, GL_EXT_semaphore_fd, GL_ARB_bindless_texture, and GL_ARB_transform_feedback_overflow_query.

Additionally, it adds support for the GL_EXT_shader_framebuffer_fetch and GL_EXT_shader_framebuffer_fetch_non_coherent extension for the Intel i965 OpenGL graphics driver, support for the GL_KHR_blend_equation_advanced extension for the RadeonSI graphics driver, and enables disk shader cache support for the Intel i965 OpenGL graphics driver by default.

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RK3399 SBC has 9-36V DC and optional 4G, WiFi, serial, and HDMI-in modules

Filed under
Android
Ubuntu

ICNexus’ “SBC3100” SBC runs Ubuntu or Android on a Rockchip RK3399 with up to 4GB RAM and 16GB flash plus HDMI 2.0, DP, eDP, MIPI-DSI and -CSI, 9-36V power, optional WiFi/BT, and a mini-PCIe slot with optional 3G or 4G.

Taiwan-based ICNexus’ SBC3100 joins a growing list of SBCs that feature, the hhigh-end Rockchip RK3399 SoC, and like most, it taps the high-end SoC to provide an extensive feature list. Unlike most we’ve seen, however, it is not publicly priced and appears to be a proprietary product, such as Aaeon’s Pico-ITX based RICO-3399.

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Samsung 970 EVO NVMe SSD Benchmarks On Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Ubuntu

Last month Samsung introduced the 970 Series solid-state drives with the mainstream 970 EVO models and 970 PRO models for professionals/enthusiasts. The 970 Series moves to a 64-layer flash and uses a five-core Phoenix controller. For those curious about the Samsung 970 EVO performance under Linux, I have carried out some quick benchmarks to show off its potential under Ubuntu.

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Canonical Outs New Kernel Security Updates for All Supported Ubuntu Releases

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

The new kernel updates are available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating system series and address a total of nine security vulnerabilities affecting the kernels for 64-bit, 32-bit, Raspberry Pi 2, AWS, and GCP systems, as well as cloud environments.

They address a security issue (CVE-2018-1092 and CVE-2018-1093) affecting the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Ubuntu 17.10, and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS releases and discovered by Wen Xu in Linux kernel's EXT4 file system implementation, which could allow an attacker to crash the vulnerable system by causing a denial of service when mounting a specially crafted EXT4 file system.

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Devuan, Canonical and Ubuntu

Filed under
OS
Ubuntu
  • Devuan ships second stable cut of its systemd-free Linux

    Systemd-free Linux distro Devuan has released its stable Version 2.0.

    The project's last release candidate was released in May, and as you'd hope, not much has changed between then and full release.

    Because it's written by purists, we should include the full name of the release: it's Devuan GNU+Linux 2.0 ASCII Stable.

  • The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 531
  • Empowering developers to embrace Linux

     

    There is a huge opportunity for businesses to embrace new technologies and move their company forward. Open source and snaps are simple solutions, but ones that gives the most vital innovators in a business - developers - the tools they need to be confident in launching some of the world’s most utilised software.    

  • R 3.5.0 on Debian and Ubuntu: An Update

    R 3.5.0 was released a few weeks ago. As it changes some (important) internals, packages installed with a previous version of R have to be rebuilt. This was known and expected, and we took several measured steps to get R binaries to everybody without breakage.

    The question of but how do I upgrade without breaking my system was asked a few times, e.g., on the r-sig-debian list as well as in this StackOverflow question.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE/Qt: Qt 3D, Kube/Kolab, GSoC, and Atelier (3-D Printing)

  • What a mesh!
    With all the advances being made in Qt 3D, we wanted to create some new examples showing some of what it can do. To get us started, we decided to use an existing learning framework, so we followed the open source Tower Defence course, which you can find at CGCookie. Being a game, it allows an interactive view of everything at work, which is very useful.
  • Last week in Kube
    Perhaps if Windows wasn’t such a PITA there would be more progress
  • GSoC 2018: Week 4 & 5
    The last 2 weeks were mainly dedicatd for reviews and testing and thanks to my mentors, I passed the first evaluation with good work till now. Some significant changes were made on discussion with my mentors during the last 2 weeks in the code and some new features.
  • Giving Atelier some Love
    I work for atelier together with Chris, Lays and Patrick for quite a while, but I was basically being the “guardian angel” of the project being invocked when anything happened or when they did not know how to proceed (are you a guardian angel of a project? we have many that need that) For instance I’v done the skeleton for the plugin system, the buildsystem and some of the modules in the interface, but nothing major as I really lacked the time and also lacked a printer.

Proprietary Software on GNU/Linux

  • Winepak – Install Windows Apps and Games on Linux via Flatpak
    A reason for Linux not being more used as added in the comments section of a recent article is “Adobe and Games“. Well, there is a latest Linux bad guy in town and it is here to comfort us in a cooler way than Wine.
  • Mark Text Markdown Editor Adds Sidebar And Tabs Support
    Mark Text is a somewhat new free and open source Electron Markdown editor for Windows, Mac and Linux, which supports the CommonMark Spec and the GitHub Flavored Markdown Spec. The app features a seamless live preview using Snabbdom as the render engine, multiple edit modes (Typewriter, Source Code and Focus), includes code fence support, light and drak themes, emoji auto-completion, and export to PDF, HTML or styled HTML.
  • Google’s VR180 Creator Makes It Easier to Edit VR Video on Linux
    It’s called “VR180 Creator” (catchy) and the tool aims to make it easier for people to edit video shot on 180-degree and 360-degree devices like the Lenovo Mirage camera (pictured opposite). And boy is just-such a tool needed! VR180 Creator: Easier VR Video Editing Editing VR video is, to be perfectly frank, a pain in the rump end. So by releasing this new, open-source tool for free Google is being rather smart.Anything that makes it easier for consumers and content creators to edit VR on something other than a high-end specialist rig is going to help the format flourish.

Devuan GNU+Linux 2.0.0 "ASCII"

When I am trying out a desktop distribution, what really tends to divide the field of Linux distributions in my mind is not whether the system uses MATE or Plasma, or whether the underlying package manager uses RPM or Deb files. What tends to leave a lasting impression with me is whether the desktop environment, its applications and controls feel like a cooperative, cohesive experience or like a jumble of individual tools that happen to be part of the same operating system. In my opinion Ubuntu running the Unity desktop and Linux Mint's Cinnamon desktop are good examples of the cohesive approach. The way openSUSE's administration tools work together provides another example. Like them or hate them, I think most people can see there is an overall design, a unifying vision, being explored with those distributions. I believe Devuan falls into the other category, presenting the user with a collection of utilities and features where some assembly is still required. This comes across in little ways. For example, many distributions ship Mozilla's Firefox web browser and the Thunderbird e-mail client together as a set, and they generally complement each other. Devuan ships Firefox, but then its counterpart is the mutt console e-mail program which feels entirely out of place with the rest of the desktop software. The PulseAudio sound mixing utility is included, but its system tray companion is not present by default. Even the system installer, which switches back and forth between graphical windows and a text console, feels more like a collection of uncoordinated prompts rather than a unified program or script. Some people may like the mix-and-match approach, but I tend to prefer distributions where it feels like the parts are fitted together to create a unified experience. What I found was that Devuan provided an experience where I had to stop and think about where items were or how I was going to use them rather than having the pieces seamlessly fit together. However, once I got the system set up in a way that was more to my liking, I appreciated the experience provided. Devuan offers a stable, flexible platform. Once I shaped the operating system a little, I found it to be fast, light and capable. Having a fairly large repository of software available along with Flatpak support provided a solid collection of applications on a conservative operating system foundation. It was a combination I liked. In short, I think Devuan has some rough edges and setting it up was an unusually long and complex experience by Linux standards. I certainly wouldn't recommend Devuan to newcomers. However, a day or two into the experience, Devuan's stability and performance made it a worthwhile journey. I think Devuan may be a good alternative to people who like running Debian or other conservative distributions such as Slackware. I suspect I may soon be running Devuan's Raspberry Pi build on my home server where its lightweight nature will be welcome. Read more Also: deepin 15.6 Released With New Features: Get This Beautiful Linux Distro Here

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