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Ubuntu 18.10 "Cosmic Cuttlefish" Prepares For Its Beta Release

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Ubuntu

This evening the "Cosmic Cuttlefish" embarked on its beta freeze ahead of the official Ubuntu 18.10 Beta due out later this week.

Ubuntu Release Team member Adam Conrad has announced the beta freeze with hopes of delivering the beta images on Thursday, 27 September.

If the beta preparations go as planned, the Ubuntu 18.10 kernel freeze based on the Linux 4.18 code-base is set to happen on 4 October. The final code freeze and release candidates are than due on 11 October. The official Ubuntu 18.10 release is penciled in for 18 October.

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Also: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 546

Ubuntu 18.10 Performance Is Looking Up, But Clear Linux Still Leads In Many Tests

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

With less than one month until Ubuntu 18.10 "Cosmic Cuttlefish" releases, I have begun my usual benchmarking dance in checking out how the Ubuntu performance is looking to its current release, in this case the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS "Bionic Beaver". Our first performance look at Ubuntu 18.10 is with a mix of seven Intel and AMD desktop systems while using Ubuntu 18.04 LTS with all updates, Ubuntu 18.10 in its current near-final form, and using Intel's Clear Linux as a gold standard reference with it generally offering the leading out-of-the-box Linux x86_64 performance of major distributions.

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Also: Ethereum Crypto Mining Performance Benchmarks On The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti

Ubuntu Studio 18.10 Wallpaper Contest Winners

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Ubuntu

We would like to thank everyone who participated in our wallpaper contest for Ubuntu Studio 18.10! With 487 votes, the top 5 submissions were chosen. The winners can be found at this link.

Additionally, we’d like to announce the new default wallpaper for 18.10, designed by Ubuntu Studio developer Eylul Dogruel, and is pictured to the right.

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Elementary OS Juno Beta 2 Released

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Ubuntu

Elementary OS June beta 2 is now available to download.

This second beta build of the Ubuntu-based Linux distribution touts a number of changes over the elementary OS june beta released back in July.

Due to the shifting sands on which Juno is built the elementary team advise those planning on testing the release to do so by making a fresh install rather than doing an upgrade from beta 1 or (worse) an older version of elementary OS.

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Ubuntu: PlayOnLinux, Foundations Team, Ubuntu Podcast, Kubernetes, Graphics

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Ubuntu
  • How to install PlayOnLinux in Ubuntu Desktop 18.04

    If you need to install a Windows desktop app on Linux, your best bet is PlayOnLinux.

  • Help needed to improve proposed migration

    Every once in a while, in the Foundations team, we do a coding day. A year ago, Lukasz and I wrote a script, following an idea from Steve Langasek, to provide "hints" and help for the next steps necessary for a package to migrate from -proposed to -release.

    "ubuntu-archive-assistant" was born. I just pushed this to lp:ubuntu-dev-tools, after it being on its own in a separate git tree for a long while. I'd love to get help for feedback, as well as more people contributing fixes, etc. ubuntu-archive-assistant is designed to let you look at a specific package in -proposed and try to tell you what to do next to ensure it migrates from -proposed.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E28 – Twenty-Eight and a Half Wishes - Ubuntu Podcast

    This week we’ve been playing Two Point Hospital and experimenting with ChromiumOS. We bring you some command line love and go over all your feedback.

  • Ubuntu does Kubernetes

    Canonical also does Kubernetes, but not in a ‘me too!’ kind of way. The Canonical Distribution of Kubernetes (CDK) is pure upstream Kubernetes tested across the widest range of clouds — from public clouds to private data centres, from bare metal to virtualised infrastructure.

  • Ubuntu 18.10's SDL2 Build Will Ship With Vulkan Support Enabled

    Released almost exactly one year ago to the day was SDL 2.0.6 that brought with it some Vulkan helpers. Finally with the upcoming Ubuntu 18.10 "Cosmic Cuttlefish" release, those Vulkan bits will be enabled.

  • NVIDIA PRIME in Ubuntu 18.04 and 18.10, and a call for testing

    Ubuntu 18.04 marked the transition to a new, more granular, packaging of the NVIDIA drivers, which, unfortunately, combined with a change in logind, and with the previous migration from Lightdm to Gdm3, caused (Intel+NVIDIA) hybrid laptops to stop working the way they used to in Ubuntu 16.xx and older.

Mir Release 1.0

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu
  • IoT Graphics: Mir Release 1.0

    The Mir team is pleased to announce the milestone release of Mir 1.0.0. This is the first major release targeted at IoT device makers and enthusiasts looking to build the next-generation of graphical solutions.

  • Mir 1.0 Released For "Next-Generation of Graphical Solutions"

    As we were expecting over the last few days, the long-awaited release of Mir 1.0 is now available. It's certainly a different beast now than when "Mir 1.0" was talked about in the past now that it's focused on providing Wayland support.

Ubuntu-based elementary OS 5.0 'Juno' Beta 2 Linux distro now available

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OS
Ubuntu

Why don’t more desktop computer users use Linux? Well, software compatibility aside, there is fear of change and the unknown. For a user to switch from Windows, it must be a fairly simple affair. For years, just installing a Linux-based operating system was a daunting task. These days, it can be faster and easier than installing Windows 10 -- depending on distro, of course.

For beginners, once installed, their chosen Linux distro should be easy to use with an intuitive desktop environment. I'm a big fan of GNOME, but understandably, not all folks like it -- especially Linux novices. One particular Linux-based desktop operating system has been focusing on accessibility to all -- elementary OS. This distro is polished and aims to be easy to use for both experts and beginners alike. Today, version 5.0 of the OS -- called "Juno" -- reaches Beta 2. Impressively, there have been over 200 fixes implemented since Beta 1.

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Ubuntu 18.04 and 18.10 Hybrid Laptop Users Invited to Test Nvidia PRIME Support

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Ubuntu

With the release of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) as the first LTS (Long Term Support) Ubuntu release to ship with the GNOME desktop environment by default instead of Canonical's in-house built Unity desktop, hybrid laptop users with Intel and Nvidia GPUs lost the way Nvidia PRIME worked in the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) series.

But it looks like some Ubuntu developers like Alberto Milone never stopped looking for a fix, and he and his team have successfully released a patch for the bug causing increased power consumption when using the power saving profile with the Nvidia GPU turned off, as well as the inability to switch between power profiles when logging out.

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Debian Patches for Intel's Defects, Canonical to Fix Ubuntu Security Flaws for a Fee

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Security
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian Outs Updated Intel Microcode to Mitigate Spectre V4 and V3a on More CPUs

    The Debian Project released an updated Intel microcode firmware for users of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system series to mitigate two of the latest Spectre vulnerabilities on more Intel CPUs.

    Last month, on August 16, Debian's Moritz Muehlenhoff announced the availability of an Intel microcode update that provided Speculative Store Bypass Disable (SSBD) support needed to address both the Spectre Variant 4 and Spectre Variant 3a security vulnerabilities.

    However, the Intel microcode update released last month was available only for some types of Intel CPUs, so now the Debian Project released an updated version that implements SSBD support for additional Intel CPU models to mitigate both Spectre V4 and V3a on Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" systems.

  • Announcing Extended Security Maintenance for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS – “Trusty Tahr” [Ed: Canonical looking to profit from security flaws in Ubuntu like Microsoft does in Windows.]

    Ubuntu is the basis for the majority of cloud-based workloads today. With over 450 million public cloud instances launched since the release of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, a number that keeps accelerating on a day-per-day basis since, many of the largest web-scale deployments are using Ubuntu. This includes financial, big data, media, and many other workloads and use cases, which rely on the stability and continuity of the underlying operating system to provide the mission-critical service their customers rely on.

    Extended Security Maintenance (ESM) was introduced for Ubuntu 12.04 LTS as a way to extend the availability of critical and important security patches beyond the nominal End of Life date of Ubuntu 12.04. Organisations use ESM to address security compliance concerns while they manage the upgrade process to newer versions of Ubuntu under full support. The ability to plan application upgrades in a failsafe environment continues to be cited as the main value for adoption of ESM. With the End of Life of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS in April 2019, and to support the planning efforts of developers worldwide, Canonical is announcing the availability of ESM for Ubuntu 14.04.

  • Canonical Announces Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) Extended Security Maintenance

    Canonical announced today that it would extend its commercial Extended Security Maintenance (ESM) offering to the Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating system series starting May 2019.

    Last year on April 28, 2017, when the Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) operating system series reached end of life, Canonical announced a new way for corporate users and enterprises to receive security updates if they wanted to keep their current Ubuntu 12.04 LTS installations and had no plans to upgrade to a newer LTS (Long Term Support) release. The offering was called Extended Security Maintenance (ESM) and had a great success among businesses.

What’s New in Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS is the latest release of Ubuntu budgie. As part of Ubuntu 18.04 flavor this release ships with latest Budgie desktop 10.4 as default desktop environment. Powered by Linux 4.15 kernel and shipping with the same internals as Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), the Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS official flavor will be supported for 3 years, until April 2021.

Prominent new features include support for adding OpenVNC connections through the NetworkManager applet, better font handling for Chinese and Korean languages, improved keyboard shortcuts, color emoji support for GNOME Characters and other GNOME apps, as well as window-shuffler capability.

Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS also ships with a new exciting GTK+ theme by default called Pocillo, support for dynamic workspaces, as well as a “minimal installation” option in the graphical installer that lets users install Ubuntu Budgie with only the Chromium web browser and a handful of basic system utilities.

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Announcing Oracle Solaris 11.4 SRU1

  • Announcing Oracle Solaris 11.4 SRU1
    Today we're releasing the first SRU for Oracle Solaris 11.4! This is the next installment in our ongoing support train for Oracle Solaris 11 and there will be no further Oracle Solairs 11.3 SRUs delivered to the support repository. Due to the timing of our releases and some fixes being in Oracle Solaris 11.3 SRU35 but not in 11.4, not all customers on Oracle Solaris 11.3 SRU35 were able to update to Oracle Solaris 11.4 when it was released. SRU1 includes all these fixes and customers can now update to Oracle Solaris 11.4 SRU1 via 'pkg update' from the support repository or by downloading the SRU from My Oracle Support Doc ID 2433412.1.
  • Oracle Solaris 11.4 SRU1 Released
    It's been just under one month since Oracle's long-awaited debut of Solaris 11.4 and now its first stable release update has been issued. Solaris 11.4 SRU1 is mainly intended to fix some early bugs and those that didn't make the cut for getting in the initial 11.4 release. One new feature is support for "Memory Reservation Pools for Kernel Zones" to help systems with high levels of memory contention or fragmented memory by allowing memory to be reserved ahead of time.

Mozilla: Privacy, R.I.P., and Consent Management at Mozfest 2018

  • Firefox collects data on you through hidden add-ons

    Mozilla, the organisation that produces the Firefox browser and makes a loud noise about its open source credentials, is quietly collecting telemetry data on its users by the use of hidden add-ons, even though publicly visible telemetry controls are not selected.

  • R.I.P., Charles W. Moore, a fine man who liked fine Macs
    A farewell and au revoir to a great gentleman in making the most of your old Mac, Charles W. Moore, who passed away at his home in rural Canada on September 16 after a long illness. Mr Moore was an early fan of TenFourFox, even back in the old bad Firefox 4 beta days, and he really made his famous Pismo PowerBook G3 systems work hard for it.
  • Consent management at Mozfest 2018
    Good news. It looks like we're having a consent management mini-conference as part of Mozfest next month. (I'm one of the organizers for the Global Consent Manager session, and plan to attend the others.)

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