Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ubuntu

Canonical/Ubuntu: Canonical's Engineering Tech Lead, Field Product Manager, and Designers'/Developers' Updates

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • A Complete Look At Spectre V1/V2/V4 & Meltdown

    Canonical's Engineering Tech Lead, Gavin Guo, has passed along a big slide deck on a presentation he is preparing about the Spectre and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities.

    Gavin's presentation is mostly focused on Spectre V2 since that is vulnerable to attacking the host system from a guest VM, but the other vulnerabilities are also covered in his 77-page slide deck with great detail.

  • A unified OpenStack for a scalable open infrastructure

    Stu Miniman and John Boyer of theCUBE interviewed Mark Baker, Field Product Manager, Canonical at the OpenStack Summit in Vancouver. Read on to to find out about OpenStack’s increasing maturity.

    The Kubernetes and OpenStack story isn’t simple. Challenges exist, and plenty of pathfinding still needs to take place when it comes to Kubernetes.

    Customers want to take different approaches with how they want to plug together OpenStack components in order to create a unified stack is complex. Some customers want Kubernetes running alongside OpenStack, or on top of OpenStack, or even OpenStack running on Kubernetes.

  • Design and Web team summary – 18 June 2018

    Welcome to the latest work and updates from the design and web team.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 532

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 532 for the week of June 10 – 16, 2018.

Linspire 8 Enters Development Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Freespire 3.0.9 Is Out

Filed under
Ubuntu

Freespire 3.0.9 is a small incremental update of the free and open-source GNU/Linux distribution that includes all the latest security and software updates released upstream until June 11, 2018. It also introduces new light and dark modes, a full instance of the Calligra office suite, and replaces Mozilla Thunderbird with Kontact.

The developers recommend all users running the Freespire 3.0 operating system series on their personal computers to run a system-wide update if they want to upgrade to Freespire 3.0.9 and receive all the latest changes. On the other hand, new users are encouraged to download the Freespire 3.0.9 ISO image.

Read more

Also: Linspire 8.0 Alpha 1 Released

Canonical Shifts Its Fiscal Year Ahead Of Likely IPO

Filed under
Ubuntu

You have likely heard by now about Ubuntu maker Canonical planning to do an initial public offering (IPO) at some point in the not too distant future to become a publicly-traded company. The latest sign of that is Canonical has now shifted its corporate calendar.

Rather than ending its accounting period now on 31 March of each year, Canonical is shifting that to align with the end of each calendar year (31 December). 31 March tends to be the end of fiscal years for UK-based organizations. This change may indicate a desire of Canonical to more likely list on one of the US-based stock exchanges rather than London, but others may have differing hypothesis over the change.

Read more

Canonical Releases Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Kernel Security Update for Raspberry Pi 2

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Earlier this week, Canonical released an important kernel security update for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, as well as other supported Ubuntu releases like Ubuntu 17.10, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, to address various vulnerabilities affecting the kernel packages for 64-bit machines, Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Google Cloud Platform (GCP) systems, and cloud environments.

Now, the same kernel patch that was made available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS users on 64-bit, AWS, GCP, and cloud environments is now available for Raspberry Pi 2 devices too, fixing an issue (CVE-2018-1092) in Linux kernel's EXT4 file system implementation discovered by Wen Xu, which could allow an attacker to crash the affected system by mounting a specially crafted EXT4 file system.

Read more

Canonical Cuts Its Own Path To Put Linux In The Cloud

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
Ubuntu

Linux has gradually grown in importance along with the Internet and now the hyperscalers that define the next generation of experience on that global network. Most of the software running at the hyperscalers – with the exception of Microsoft, of course, is built upon Linux and other open source technologies. In turn, this means that Linux and open source have started to become more important in the enterprise arena, as trends such as cloud computing and large scale data analytics drove the need for similar technologies in the corporate datacenter.

Adapting the collection of open source packages that comprise a typical Linux build and making it suitable for enterprise consumption has led to carefully curated distributions that emphasise reliability and stability, plus paid technical support services and maintenance updates. These are typified by Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES), distributions that have a long product lifecycle of ten years and thirteen years, respectively.

Read more

LTE-equipped automotive gateway runs Ubuntu on Bay Trail

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

Kontron’s rugged “EvoTrac G102” is an in-vehicle cellular gateway that runs Ubuntu on a quad-core Atom E3845, and offers 64GB eMMC, GbE, CAN, 2x USB, and a 3G/4G module with GPS.

Kontron unveiled the EvoTrac G102 last month, and earlier this month announced that it will act as the control box for Hyliion’s 6X4HE “intelligent electric hybrid system for Class 8 trucks and trailers.” The 6X4HE provides regenerative braking design to capture power for fuel savings of up to 30 percent,” says Kontron.

Read more

Also: GPD Pocket 2 Launches This Summer with a Faster Processor

Canonical on So-called 'Private Cloud'

Filed under
Server
Ubuntu
  • 451 Research benchmarks public and private infrastructure cost

    451 Research’s latest report, ‘Busting the myth of private cloud economics ’, found that Canonical’s managed private OpenStack offering, BootStack, delivers private cloud with a TCO that matches public clouds. For multi-cloud operations, enterprise can benefit from a cost effective infrastructure by combining competitive public cloud services with Canonical’s managed private OpenStack cloud on-premise.

  • Private Cloud May Be the Best Bet: Report

    News flash: Private cloud economics can offer more cost efficiency than public cloud pricing structures.

    Private (or on-premises) cloud solutions can be more cost-effective than public cloud options, according to "Busting the Myths of Private Cloud Economics," a report 451 Research and Canonical released Wednesday. That conclusion counters the notion that public cloud platforms traditionally are more cost-efficient than private infrastructures.

    Half of the enterprise IT decision-makers who participated in the study identified cost as the No. 1 pain point associated with the public cloud. Forty percent mentioned cost-savings as a key driver of cloud migration.

    "We understand that people are looking for more cost-effective infrastructure. This was not necessarily news to us," said Mark Baker, program director at Canonical.

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Users Can Now Install Mesa 18.1.1 to Improve Their Linux Gaming

Filed under
Ubuntu

Implementing OpenGL 3.1 with ARB_compatibility on RadeonSI, r600, NV50, NVC0, Softpipe, LLVMpipe, and SVGA graphics drivers, the Mesa 18.1 graphics stack series debuted on May 18, 2018, with support for new OpenGL extensions, including GL_EXT_semaphore, GL_EXT_semaphore_fd, GL_ARB_bindless_texture, and GL_ARB_transform_feedback_overflow_query.

Additionally, it adds support for the GL_EXT_shader_framebuffer_fetch and GL_EXT_shader_framebuffer_fetch_non_coherent extension for the Intel i965 OpenGL graphics driver, support for the GL_KHR_blend_equation_advanced extension for the RadeonSI graphics driver, and enables disk shader cache support for the Intel i965 OpenGL graphics driver by default.

Read more

RK3399 SBC has 9-36V DC and optional 4G, WiFi, serial, and HDMI-in modules

Filed under
Android
Ubuntu

ICNexus’ “SBC3100” SBC runs Ubuntu or Android on a Rockchip RK3399 with up to 4GB RAM and 16GB flash plus HDMI 2.0, DP, eDP, MIPI-DSI and -CSI, 9-36V power, optional WiFi/BT, and a mini-PCIe slot with optional 3G or 4G.

Taiwan-based ICNexus’ SBC3100 joins a growing list of SBCs that feature, the hhigh-end Rockchip RK3399 SoC, and like most, it taps the high-end SoC to provide an extensive feature list. Unlike most we’ve seen, however, it is not publicly priced and appears to be a proprietary product, such as Aaeon’s Pico-ITX based RICO-3399.

Read more

Samsung 970 EVO NVMe SSD Benchmarks On Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Ubuntu

Last month Samsung introduced the 970 Series solid-state drives with the mainstream 970 EVO models and 970 PRO models for professionals/enthusiasts. The 970 Series moves to a 64-layer flash and uses a five-core Phoenix controller. For those curious about the Samsung 970 EVO performance under Linux, I have carried out some quick benchmarks to show off its potential under Ubuntu.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.18 RC2 Released From China

  • Linux 4.18-rc2
    Another week, another -rc. I'm still traveling - now in China - but at least I'm doing this rc Sunday _evening_ local time rather than _morning_. And next rc I'll be back home and over rmy jetlag (knock wood) so everything should be back to the traditional schedule. Anyway, it's early in the rc series yet, but things look fairly normal. About a third of the patch is drivers (drm and s390 stand out, but here's networking and block updates too, and misc noise all over). We also had some of the core dma files move from drivers/base/dma-* (and lib/dma-*) to kernel/dma/*. We sometimes do code movement (and other "renaming" things) after the merge window simply because it tends to be less disruptive that way. Another 20% is under "tools" - mainly due to some selftest updates for rseq, but there's some turbostat and perf tooling work too. We also had some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs. I'm going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have been in rc2. They were "fixes" not in the "regressions" sense, but in the "missing features" sense. So please, people, the "fixes" during the rc series really should be things that are _regressions_. If it used to work, and it no longer does, then fixing that is a good and proper fix. Or if something oopses or has a security implication, then the fix for that is a real fix. But if it's something that has never worked, even if it "fixes" some behavior, then it's new development, and that should come in during the merge window. Just because you think it's a "fix" doesn't mean that it really is one, at least in the "during the rc series" sense. Anyway, with that small rant out of the way, the rest is mostly arch updates (x86, powerpc, arm64, mips), and core networking. Go forth and test. Things look fairly sane, it's not really all that scary. Shortlog appended for people who want to scan through what changed. Linus
  • Linux 4.18-rc2 Released With A Normal Week's Worth Of Changes
    Due to traveling in China, Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.18-rc2 kernel a half-day ahead of schedule, but overall things are looking good for Linux 4.18.

A GTK+ 3 update

  • A GTK+ 3 update
    When we started development towards GTK+ 4, we laid out a plan that said GTK+ 3.22 would be the final, stable branch of GTK+ 3. And we’ve stuck to this for a while. I has served us reasonably well — GTK+ 3 stopped changing in drastic ways, which was well-received, and we are finally seeing applications moving from GTK+ 2.
  • GTK+ 3.24 To Deliver Some New Features While Waiting For GTK4
    While the GNOME tool-kit developers have been hard at work on GTK4 roughly the past two years and have kept GTK3 frozen at GTK+ 3.22, a GTK+ 3.24 release is now being worked on to deliver some new features until GTK+ 4.0 is ready to be released. While GTK+ 4.0 is shaping up well and GTK+ 3.22 was planned to be the last GTK3 stable release, the developers have had second thoughts due to GTK+ 4 taking time to mature. Some limited new features are being offered up in the GTK+ 3.24 release to debut this September.

Finally: First stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5

After almost exactly two years of being work-in-progress, the first stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5 has been published! You can grab the sources at your local KDE mirror. Some distributions like ArchLinux already ship binary packages. After one beta and one release candidate, now comes the final release. You may wonder why this release gets version number 0.8.1 but not 0.8 as expected. This is simply due to the fact that I noticed a bug in CMakeLists.txt when computing version numbers which did not work if the version number just had two fields, i. e. no ‘patch’ version. As the code and the tag of 0.8 was already pushed, I had no alternative than to fix the problem and increase the version number. Otherwise, the ChangeLog (alternative view) is virtually unchanged compared to the last pre-release. Read more

Today in Techrights