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Ubuntu

UBports Working Lately on Ubuntu Touch Port for Nexus 5, Based on Ubuntu 16.04

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Ubuntu

UBports announced today on Twitter that they managed to successfully run their modification of Canonical's deprecated Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system on the Nexus 5 smartphone.

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Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) Needs Some Testing, Here's How You Can Help

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Ubuntu

Canonical's Alan Pope invites the Ubuntu community today to download and test out the latest daily build ISO images of the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system to report if things are working correctly or not on their PCs.

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Ubuntu’s Impact on Software Naming Conventions and Testing of Artful Aardvark

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Ubuntu
  • Coincidence or Subtle Influence? Ubuntu’s Impact on Software Naming Conventions

    Could Ubuntu have had an impact on the versioning and naming conventions of other software projects, including Windows, Android and more?

    Reader Abu A. pinged us earlier today to share this interesting insight he has on Ubuntu’s contributions to the wider software community.

  • The Artful Aardvark Needs You!

    I don’t consider myself to be psychic and yet, somehow, miraculously, I happen to know what you’re going to be doing later.

    You’re going to help test the Ubuntu 17.10 daily builds on real hardware to uncover unwanted behaviour in user-facing features.

Ubuntu Desktop Testing, Ubuntu Server Development

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu Linux and Husarion's CORE2-ROS Make Robot Development Easy and Fun

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Hardware
Ubuntu

Building robots is a challenging task, even for Husarion, a robotic company known for creating a rapid development platform for robots called CORE2-ROS, which, in combination with the popular Ubuntu OS, makes robot development easy and fun.

Husarion's Dominik Nowak explains in a recent blog article how CORE2, the company's second generation robotics controller, and their cloud platform that helps them manage all CORE2-based robots assists those interested in creating robots, using only an SBC (single-board computer) like Raspberry Pi with Ubuntu Linux pre-installed and a real-time microcontroller board.

"Building robots is a challenging task that the Husarion team is trying to make easier," said Dominik Nowak, CEO at Husarion. "CORE2 combines a real-time microcontroller board and a single board computer running Ubuntu. Ubuntu is the most popular Linux distribution not only for desktops but also for embedded hardware in IoT & robotics applications."

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Also Linux/Ubuntu-based: Review: Flying the super-small, super-fun DJI Spark

Ubuntu Getting Significant Usability Improvements for Bluetooth and USB Speakers

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Ubuntu

In his latest report, Ubuntu Desktop team leader Will Cooke talks about some of the latest improvements that landed in the repositories of the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system regarding audio support.

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Automated Firmware Updates, New Installer Coming to System76's Ubuntu Laptops

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Ubuntu

System76, the computer reseller known for shipping laptops and desktop pre-loaded with the Ubuntu Linux operating system, posted an update on the work they're doing for the Pop!_OS distribution.

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Desktop: GNU/Linux on PowerPC, Decline of the PC, Canonical's and System76's Desktop Work

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GNU
Linux
GNOME
Ubuntu
  • Revive a PowerPC Mac Running Linux

    I’m about to show you how to turn that old Mac hardware you have into something useful. It doesn’t matter if it’s an ancient PowerBook G4 or a slightly more recent model of MacBook. Just because it can’t run the latest and greatest version of macOS doesn’t necessarily mean it’s time to put it out to pasture. In this article, I’ll show you how you can revive a PowerPC Mac running Linux, like I’m doing on the PowerBook G4 I’m using to write this article.

  • PC shipments hit the lowest level in a decade [iophk: "Microsoft is dependent on OEM sales of Microsoft Orifice and Microsoft Windows"]

    PC shipments are at their lowest levels since 2007, Gartner says.

  • Ubuntu Desktop Weekly Update: July 14, 2017

    GDM has now replaced LightDM. We’re working on the transition between display managers to make sure that users are seamlessly transitioned to the new stack. We’re doing regular automated upgrade tests to make sure everything keeps working, but we’re keen to get your bug reports.

  • Ubuntu 17.10: Continued Work On VA-API, Switching To GDM

    Will Cooke of Canonical has posted the latest weekly status update concerning happenings for the desktop on Ubuntu 17.10.

    As part of the transition to the GNOME Shell desktop by default, GDM has replaced LightDM as the log-in display manager. They've also demoted around 70 packages from their desktop ISOs to help lighten up the weight.

  • Canonical Working Lately on Packaging More GNOME Apps as Snaps for Ubuntu Linux

    Canonical's Ubuntu Desktop director Will Cooke is back this week with another update on what's going on with the development process of the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system.

    It looks like Canonical's Ubuntu Desktop and Snappy teams are putting a lot of effort lately on packaging as much GNOME apps to the Snap universal binary format as possible, by using the gnome-3-24 platform Snap they created recently. With this, they want to make possible the sharing of common libraries between GNOME apps, which automatically translates to smaller Snaps and easy maintenance of them.

  • Is Terminix The Best Tiling Terminal Emulator on Linux?

    Terminix (aka Tilix) is a tiling terminal emulator for the GNOME desktop. It's featured, fast and frequently recommended — here's why you should try it too.

  • System76 Might Make Their Own OS Installer, Will Ship Automatic Firmware Updates

    Linux laptop vendor System76 has provided a status update on their activities around their Pop!_OS Linux distribution.

    System76 developers continue working on this Ubuntu fork and they have been focusing on more GNOME patches from the desktop side. They also mentioned they are considering writing a new operating system installer. So far they have been hacking on Ubuntu's Ubiquity installer, but they are getting the feeling now that it's over-complicated. They are hoping for a very quick and easy install process with all of the initial user-setup being punted off to GNOME's first-run helper.

Audiocasts: Ubuntu Podcast and Ubuntu on The Changelog,

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Interviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 17.10 Makes It Easier to Use Bluetooth Speakers and More Ubuntu Developments

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Development
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 17.10 Makes It Easier to Use Bluetooth Speakers

    Ubuntu will automatically switch sound output to Bluetooth when you connect a Bluetooth speaker, soundbar or headset.

    Connecting a compatible USB audio device will also see the sound output auto-switch to that device.

    While most Bluetooth speakers, headsets and USB audio devices already well with Ubuntu you typically have to dive into the system’s sound settings and manually select the device for audio output.

    In a world where Android and iOS smartphones automatically switch to Bluetooth devices when connected, requiring manual user input is not only a little old-fashioned but may, to users otherwise unaware, appear broken.

  • Ubuntu Foundations Development Summary: July 13, 2017
  • Ubuntu OpenStack Dev Summary – 13th July 2017
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More in Tux Machines

Debian GNU/Linux 9.1 "Stretch" Live & Installable ISOs Now Available to Download

As we reported the other day, the Debian Project unveiled the first point release of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system, but no installation or live ISOs were made available to download. That changes today, July 23, 2017, as the Debian CD team lead by Steve McIntyre has prepared the new installation images of Debian GNU/Linux 9.1 "Stretch" for 64-bit (amd64), 32-bit (i386), PowerPC 64-bit Little Endian (ppc64el), ARM64 (AArch64), ARMhf, Armel, MIPS, MIPS 64-bit Little Endian (mips64el), MIPSEL, and IBM System z (s390x) hardware architectures. Multi-arch images supporting both 32-bit and 64-bit (i386 and amd64) PCs are also available for download, along with a set of twelve source ISO images. On the other hand, the Debian GNU/Linux 9.1 "Stretch" Live ISOs come in the usual flavors with the GNOME, KDE, Xfce, LXDE, MATE, and Cinnamon desktop environments, supporting both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures. Read more Also: Debian 9.1 GNU/Linux Released With 26 Security Fixes

4MLinux 23.0 BETA released.

4MLinux 23.0 BETA is ready for testing. Basically, at this stage of development, 4MLinux BETA has the same features as 4MLinux STABLE, but it provides a huge number of updated packages, including a major change in the core of the system, which now uses the GNU C Library 2.25. Read more Also: 4MLinux 23 Slated for Release in November 2017, to Be Supported Until July 2018

Review: Calculate Linux 17.6 KDE

Calculate Linux is a Gentoo-based distribution. The project's slogan is "Easy Linux from the source," which refers to the fact that Calculate is relatively easy to use but still benefits from Gentoo's powerful and flexible source-based Portage package manager. Calculate recently celebrated its tenth birthday and released Calculate Linux 17.6. The distro comes in four flavours; apart from a desktop and server edition there's Calculate Scratch ("for those who want to build a customized system that works for them") and Calculate Media Center ("for your home multimedia center"). Each version is available for the x86_64 and i686 architectures and uses SysV init rather than systemd. The desktop edition has ISOs for the KDE, Cinnamon, MATE and Xfce desktop environments - GNOME is presumably not available because of its dependency on systemd. I opted for the 64-bit KDE version, which is just over 2GB in size. Read more

Linux 4.13 RC2

  • Linux 4.13-rc2
    Things are chugging along, and we actually had a reasonably active rc2. Normally rc2 is really small because people are taking a breaher and haven't started finding bugs yet, but this time around we have a bigger-than-average rc2. We'll just have to see how that translates to the rest of the release cycle, but I suspect it's just the normal variability in this thing (and because I released -rc1 one day early, I guess rc2 was one day longer than usual despite the normal Sunday release). Changes all over, although the diffstat is dominated by the new vboxvideo staging driver. I shouldn't have let it through, but Greg, as we all know, is "special". Also, Quod licet Iovi, and all that jazz - Greg gets to occasionally break some rules. If you just ignore that new staging driver, the remainder is still about half driver patches (networking, rdma, scsi, usb). The rest looks normal too: architecture updates (x86, sparc, powerpc), filesystem (nfs, overlayfs, misc), networking and core kernel. And some new bpf testcode. Time for some more testing, people. You know the drill. Linus
  • Linux 4.13-rc2 Released, A "Reasonably Active" Update
    The second release candidate of the Linux 4.13 kernel is now available for testing.
  • The Kernel Put On Some Weight With Linux 4.13
    Here are some numbers about how much weight the kernel gained during the Linux 4.13 merge window that closed last week.