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Ubuntu: Applications Survey, Mir support for Wayland, Canonical OpenStack Pike and Bright Computing

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Ubuntu
  • Results of the Ubuntu Desktop Applications Survey

    I had the distinct honor to deliver the closing keynote of the UbuCon Europe conference in Paris a few weeks ago. First off -- what a beautiful conference and venue! Kudos to the organizers who really put together a truly remarkable event. And many thanks to the gentleman (Elias?) who brought me a bottle of his family's favorite champagne, as a gift on Day 2 Smile I should give more talks in France!

  • Mir support for Wayland

    I’ve seen some confusion about how Mir is supporting Wayland clients on the Phoronix forums . What we are doing is teaching the Mir server library to talk Wayland in addition to its original client-server protocol. That’s analogous to me learning to speak another language (such as Dutch).

    This is not anything like XMir or XWayland. Those are both implementations of an X11 server as a client of a Mir or Wayland. (Xmir is a client of a Mir server or and XWayland is a client of a Wayland server.) They both introduce a third process that acts as a “translator” between the client and server.

  • Mir 1.0 Still Planned For Ubuntu 17.10, Wayland Support Focus

    Following our reporting of Mir picking up initial support for Wayland clients, Mir developer Alan Griffiths at Canonical has further clarified the Wayland client support. It also appears they are still planning to get Mir 1.0 released in time for Ubuntu 17.10.

  • Webinar: OpenStack Pike is here, what’s new?

    Sign up for our new webinar about the Canonical OpenStack Pike release. Join us to learn about the new features and how to upgrade from Ocata to Pike using OpenStack Charms.

  • Bright Computing Announces Support for Ubuntu

    right Computing, a global leader in cluster and cloud infrastructure automation software, today announced the general availability of Bright Cluster Manager 8.0 with Ubuntu.

    With this integration, organizations can run Bright Cluster Manager Version 8.0 on top of Ubuntu, to easily build, provision, monitor and manage Ubuntu high performance clusters from a single point of control, in both on-premises and cloud-based environments.

Can Artful Aardvark Regain Ubuntu's Popularity on the Desktop?

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Ubuntu

The upcoming Artful Aardvark release marks Ubuntu's return to GNOME as its desktop environment. After seven years, Unity will be abandoned, along with plans for a single desktop for all devices and the replacement of the X window system with Mir.

According to Mark Shuttleworth, Ubuntu's founder, these changes are being made in the hopes of making profitable Canonical, Ubuntu's governing company, and to allow Canonical to focus on its server and OpenStack business. However, to desktop users, the more pressing issue is whether these changes can help Ubuntu regain its domination of the desktop.

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GNOME 3.26 is Available on Ubuntu Artful, Video Tour of Beta

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GNOME
Ubuntu

Interview with Ubuntu boss: A rich ecosystem for robotics and automation systems

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Interviews
Ubuntu

In fact, ROS is not actually an operating system at all – it’s a set of software frameworks, or a software development kit, to be installed into an operating system like Ubuntu.

As Mike Bell, executive vice president of internet of things and devices at Canonical, explains in an exclusive interview: “It’s a bit confusing because it’s called Robot Operating System, but the reason is because if you’re developing robot applications, you don’t need to worry about the fact that it’s running on Ubuntu.

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Canonical's Snapcraft Snappy and a New Snap

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Ubuntu
  • Canonical Adds Support for GNOME's JHBuild Tool to Its Snapcraft Snappy Creator

    Canonical's Sergio Schvezov released a new update to the Snapcraft tool that application developers can use to package their apps as Snaps for easy distribution on Ubuntu and other Snappy-capable GNU/Linux distros.

    Snapcraft 2.34 has been released this week and it's now available in the main repositories of various Ubuntu Linux releases that support the Snappy technologies, bringing a new plugin to support GNOME's JHBuild tool for building the entire GNOME desktop environment or select packages from the version control system.

  • Wavebox, the Powerful Email Client, Is Now Available as a Snap on Ubuntu Linux

    If you've ever dreamed of having a central hub for all your web communication tools, you should know that the powerful Wavebox web app is now available for installation on Ubuntu Linux systems as a Snap.

    That's right, Wavebox was finally ported to Canonical's Snappy technologies that let application developers package their apps as Snaps to make their distribution easy across multiple GNU/Linux operating systems. And now, it looks Wavebox arrive in the Snappy Store and can be installed on Ubuntu and other supported distros.

Ubuntu and GNOME Devs Team Up to Ease Your "Unity to GNOME" Transition

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GNOME
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system is only a few weeks away, and it will be shipping with the recently released GNOME 3.26 desktop environment by default, running on top of the next-generation Wayland display server.

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also: Canonical Adds Support for GNOME's JHBuild Tool to Its Snapcraft Snappy Creator

Ubuntu Press/Development: Kernel Team Summary, Snap, NEC, Servers and GNOME Desktop

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu-enabled open source SDR board shrinks in size and price

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OSS
Ubuntu

Lime Microsystems launched the $139 “LimeSDR Mini,” a size- and cost-reduced sibling of its Ubuntu Core-enabled LimeSDR board, at CrowdSupply.

Lime Microsystems, a developer of field programmable RF (FPRF) transceivers for wireless broadband systems, has gone to CrowdSupply again, to fund a size- and cost-reduced variant of the LimeSDR board that it launched there last year. Like its larger sibling, the LimeSDR Mini is a “free and open source project” that supports the company’s “entirely open-source” LimeSuite host-side software that supports a range of SDRs.

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Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" Beta Test Drive and a Digital Signage Solution

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" Beta Test Drive

    ​It has been a while since Canonical has launched Ubuntu 17.10 daily builds but most users don't want to switch to the latest builds as they are still in daily build period. Ubuntu 17.10 daily builds were quite unstable and many things were broken and as the first beta has released on Aug 31, I got my hands on it and tried it. Using it since then many things have been fixed. So in this article, I'm going to share my experience with Ubuntu 17.10 beta.

  • Canonical and NEC Work on Digital Signage Solution Based on Ubuntu, Raspberry Pi

    Canonical announced that it partnered with NEC Display Solutions Europe to collaborate on a new digital signage platform powered by the Ubuntu Core operating system for embedded and IoT devices.

    NEC is a Japanese multinational manufacturer of display solutions and technology services aimed at mass audiences and professional environments. Today's partnership with Canonical, the company behind the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system and Screenly, the leading digital signage software solution that leverages the Raspberry Pi single-board computer aims to facilitate the development of an upcoming, innovative digital signage solution.

    "Digital signage platforms are now an increasing must-have feature for businesses all around the world. By partnering with the brightest minds in the industry, we can continue to develop enterprise and embedded IoT uses for Ubuntu Core," said Mike Bell, EVP of IoT and Devices at Canonical. "NEC’s large format displays with their support for Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 running Ubuntu Core, offers a compelling and fully-integrated solution."

Can Ubuntu Come Back To Top On Distrowatch After GNOME Desktop Environment?

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Ubuntu

For a very long time, Ubuntu was at the heart of the Linux revolution. The leader, the heart, and soul on the quest for Linux to win the desktop operating systems wars. With the then GNOME and GNOME 2 desktop environments, the task was clear, the job was cut out and then in 2017, it has not happened yet.

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New Manjaro Release

What a week we had. With this update we have removed most of our EOL tagged kernels. Please adopt to newer series of each, when still be used. PulseAudio and Gstreamer got renewed. Also most of our kernels got newer point-releases. Series v4.12 is now marked as EOL. Guillaume worked on Pamac to solve reported issues within our v6 series. The user experience should be much better now. Latest NetworkManager, Python and Haskell updates complete this update-pack. Please report back and give us feedback for given changes made to our repositories. Read more

Linux 4.14 Is Up To Around 23.2 Million Lines Of Code

While I usually look at the Linux kernel code size following each merge window, I am a few days late this time around due to busy Xeon/EPYC benchmarking and XDC2017. Anyhow, Linux 4.14 is showing some weight gains but nothing too bad. Linux 4.14 has been another busy cycle with a lot of happenings from finally seeing Heterogeneous Memory Management merged to a lot of other new core functionality plus the always fun and exciting changes and new support happening in driver space. See our Linux 4.14 feature overview for a rundown on the new functionality. Read more

Today in Techrights

10 Best Free Photo Editors For Linux

Linux has come a long way in terms of the applications that are available for the platform. Whatever your specific needs are, you can be sure that there are at least a few applications available for you to use. Today, we'll look at 10 free photo editors for Linux, and I must say, there are a lot of image editing tools available. This post selects just 10 of these awesome tools and talks about them briefly looking at what makes them stand out. In no particular order, let's get started. Read
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