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Ubuntu

Canonical Announces Snapd 2.0.9 with Full Snap Confinement on elementary OS 0.4

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Ubuntu

Today, June 23, 2016, Canonical's David Callé proudly announced the release and general availability of Snapd 2.0.9 for the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system.

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Flatpak vs. snap wars

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Red Hat
Ubuntu
  • Linux’s RPM/deb split could be replaced by Flatpak vs. snap

    Ubuntu's "snap" applications recently went cross-platform, having been ported to other Linux distros including Debian, Arch, Fedora, and Gentoo. The goal is to simplify packaging of applications. Instead of building a deb package for Ubuntu and an RPM for Fedora, a developer could package the application as a snap and have it installed on just about any Linux distribution.

  • Canonical changes the game by announcing universal snap packages

    Every so often, I get to sit in on a phone call, video chat, or conversation that absolutely blows my mind. Tuesday, June 14 was one such occasion. I was invited to hear Mark Shuttleworth (founder of Canonical, which produces Ubuntu Linux) discuss a major announcement. Naturally, I assumed the announcement had something to do with Ubuntu Touch (maybe they'd found a major US carrier for the Ubuntu Phone). Little did I know the announcement would be so profoundly game changing.

Leftovers: Ubuntu

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Ubuntu
  • The press will believe anything about open source

    Take the case of Canonical's recent pronouncement that it has ended decades of dissonance between competing Linux package management solutions. The lack of thoughtful scrutiny of the claims by the tech press beggars belief. Fortunately, a swelling chorus of critics is rising to put the claims in context, separating the wheat from the chaff in Canonical's attempts to unify Linux distributions.

  • Keynote: More Fun, Less Friction: How Open Source Operations Will Take Big Data to the Next Level

    Solving operational difficulties with a modular, easy-to-use system was the solution Mark Shuttleworth laid out in his keynote entitled “More Fun, Less Friction” at Apache Big Data in Vancouver in May.

  • Removing Operational Friction Will Free Big Data To Do Big Things, Says Mark Shuttleworth

    Good code is cheap; it’s operational knowledge that’s holding back big data from solving the great problems of our time.

    Solving those operational difficulties with a modular, easy-to-use system was the solution Mark Shuttleworth laid out in his keynote entitled “More Fun, Less Friction” at Apache Big Data in Vancouver in May.

  • Announcing Jono Bacon Consulting

    I am really excited about this new chapter. While I feel I have a lot I can offer my clients today, I am looking forward to continuing to broaden my knowledge, expertise, and diversity of community strategy and leadership. I am also excited to share these learnings with you all in my writing, presentations, and elsewhere. This has always been a journey, and each new road opens up interesting new questions and potential, and I am thirsty to discover and explore more.

Ultimate Edition 5.0 LTS Released Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus)

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Ubuntu

After many months of silence, and probably hard work, TheeMahn has finally released a new version of his Ubuntu-based Ultimate Edition computer operating system.

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ubuntuBSD 16.04 Will Feature a Combination of BusyBox and OpenRC, But No systemd

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Ubuntu

In a series of tweets, ubuntuBSD project leader Jon Boden announced a few of the technical features coming to the soon-to-be-released ubuntuBSD 16.04 operating system.

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Why You Should Use Ubuntu LTS

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Ubuntu

One of the most common issues I see among newer Linux users is the desire to upgrade their distribution needlessly to a new bleeding-edge version. This is especially true with those who use Ubuntu and its derivatives. In this article, I'll explain why most people would be much better off sticking to stable distribution releases that have been "in the wild" for six months or longer.

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Snappy vs flatpak

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Red Hat
Ubuntu
  • Snappy vs flatpak

    There is fierce debate brewing in the Linux community right now. Here we have two rival formats for packaging software. which one will be victorious and become the standard across all Linux desktops ? The answer in our opinion is that both will find a strong following for various reasons. Both will serve the common user, but one will reign supreme for industrial use. From as security viewpoint, at least for now, Flatpak has the advantage.

  • Linux Snap Package Format Goes Multi-Distro

    Snapcraft -- the Linux package format Canonical developed for Ubuntu -- now works on multiple Linux distros, including Arch, Debian, Fedora and various flavors of Ubuntu, Canonical announced last week.

    They're being validated on CentOS, Elementary, Gentoo, Mint, OpenSUSE, OpenWrt and RHEL.

    "Distributing applications on Linux is not always easy," said Canonical's Manik Taneja, product manager for Snappy Ubuntu Core.

  • Goodbye to other packages (rpm & deb), Say Hello to Snaps

    Multiple Linux distributions and companies announced collaboration on the “snap” universal Linux package format, enabling a single binary package to work perfectly and securely on any Linux desktop, server, cloud or device.

Software radio apps are open-source on Ubuntu App Store

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Ubuntu

Lime Micro (London, UK) has announced that Ubuntu is putting together an App Store for LimeSDR that can be accessed once the LimeSDR crowd funding campaign successfully reaches its $500,000 pledge goal. The Snappy Ubuntu App Store will ensure the software defined radio (SDR) apps developed with the LimeSDR board are downloadable and those developed by Lime remain completely open-sourced.

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Peppermint 7 Could Land on June 30, Will Be an LTS Release Based on Ubuntu 16.04

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

In a brief Google+ announcement, the Peppermint OS developers have informed the community about the possible upcoming availability of the Peppermint 7 Linux operating system.

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Ubuntu phone is not yet ready for prime time

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Ubuntu

Phones that run Canonical's Ubuntu Phone operating system have been around for more than a year but given that they appear to be predominantly aimed at European markets, they are a rare sight in Australia.

One cannot blame Canonical, the company behind the phone, for Australia is a very small market and one that tends to follow American trends.

The first Ubuntu phones were released in February 2015 and came in for some criticism because they were under-powered, being a modified version of the Aquaris E4.5. With a 4.5-inch, 540x960 resolution display, a 1.3GHz quad-core MediaTek Cortex A7 processor, 1GB of RAM and 8GB of internal storage, they were not much to write home about.

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Security Leftovers

10 hot Android smartphones that got price cuts recently

With numerous smartphone getting launched each month, brands always adjust prices to give slightly competitive edge to older smartphone models and also to clear inventories. Here are 10 smartphones that got price cuts recently. Read more

Debian and Ubuntu News

  • Debian Project News - July 29th, 2016
    Welcome to this year's third issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community.
  • SteamOS Brewmaster 2.87 Released With NVIDIA Pascal Support
  • Snap interfaces for sandboxed applications
    Last week, we took a look at the initial release of the "portal" framework developed for Flatpak, the application-packaging format currently being developed in GNOME. For comparison, we will also explore the corresponding resource-control framework available in the Snap format developed in Ubuntu. The two packaging projects have broadly similar end goals, as many have observed, but they tend to vary quite a bit in the implementation details. Naturally, those differences are of particular importance to the intended audience: application developers. There is some common ground between the projects. Both use some combination of techniques (namespaces, control groups, seccomp filters, etc.) to restrict what a packaged application can do. Moreover, both implement a "deny by default" sandbox, then provide a supplemental means for applications to access certain useful system resources on a restricted or mediated basis. As we will see, there is also some overlap in what interfaces are offered, although the implementations differ. Snap has been available since 2014, so its sandboxing and resource-control implementations have already seen real-world usage. That said, the design of Snap originated in the Ubuntu Touch project aimed at smartphones, so some of its assumptions are undergoing revision as Snap comes to desktop systems. In the Snap framework, the interfaces that are defined to provide access to system resources are called, simply, "interfaces." As we will see, they cover similar territory to the recently unveiled "portals" for Flatpak, but there are some key distinctions. Two classes of Snap interfaces are defined: one for the standard resources expected to be of use to end-user applications, and one designed for use by system utilities. Snap packages using the standard interfaces can be installed with the snap command-line tool (which is the equivalent of apt for .deb packages). Packages using the advanced interfaces require a separate management tool.
  • Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) Reaches End Of Life Today (July 28)
  • Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Yakkety Yak Gets A Unity HUD-Like Searchable Menu
    MATE HUD, a Unity HUD-like tool that allows searching through an application's menu, was recently uploaded to the official Yakkety Yak repositories, and is available (but not enabled) by default in Ubuntu MATE 16.10.

Tablet review: BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition

As employees have become more and more flexible in recent years thanks to the power and performance of mobile devices, the way we work has changed dramatically. We frequently chop and change between smartphones, tablets and laptops for different tasks, which has led to the growth of the hybrid market – devices such as Microsoft’s Surface Pro 3 and Apple’s iPad Pro – that provide the power and functionality of a laptop with the mobility and convenience of a tablet. Read more