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Ubuntu

Bq's Ubuntu tablet could showcase long-awaited desktop-mobile convergence

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Ubuntu

The rumors are true: An Ubuntu-powered tablet blessed by Canonical is coming—from Spanish device maker Bq, which plans to unveil it at Mobile World Congress in February.

Linux fans have waited a long time for the realization of Canonical’s long-promised vision of “convergence,” an OS that seamlessly transitions between mobile and desktop environments. Ubuntu blog OMGUbuntu first reported the tablet on January 14, but Canonical refused to comment. In a recent interview with Spanish website Xataka, however, Bq (which has partnered with Canonical on phones) confirmed the rumor.

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Also: What you missed in tech last week: Ubuntu's big win, iOS battery bug, iPhone 6C leak

Ubuntu for TV Possibly Still in the Works

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu for TV was briefly a thing for Canonical, but it never really took off, and it slowly faded away, but it seems that they haven't given up on that idea, and we might still get it.

Ubuntu for TV was a really different operating system that was initially showcased back in January 2012, at CES. It' s been four years since then and Ubuntu for TV is no more. The previous Ubuntu community manager, Jono Bacon, said that the project didn't actually die, it was just folded back into the main distro.

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Divided Over Ubuntu’s Unity

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Ubuntu

I have commented in the past on how the needs of the average computer user are sometimes at odds with the wants of the power Linux user. Linux nerds revel in the myriad choices while new users are dazzled and confused. Canonical came up with an environment specifically catered to the novice. It doesn’t change, it doesn’t overwhelm them with choices and it doesn’t get in the way. Sit one of these folks down in front of KDE, Cinnamon, MATE or even the simplistic Gnome 3 and they are just lost. I’ve seen it time and time again. When I put someone in front of Unity, they start clicking icons in the launcher and they say, “OK, this is how I find programs… There’s my browser… Here are the files… Oh, that’s settings… Cool.” They’re good to go and don’t care one bit about the lack of customization or the relative speed of the desktop. They can get to their stuff and that’s all that matters to them. Period.

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Divided Over Ubuntu’s Unity

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Ubuntu

I find it very ironic that one of the most divisive things that ever hit the Linux scene is a Desktop Environment called Unity. For those of you who are late to the party, Unity was introduced by Canonical in 2010 and became the default desktop experience on Ubuntu with the release of Ubuntu 11.04. Unity is both loved and hated, depending on who you’re talking to at the moment, and all you gotta do to start a lively discussion is bring it up in mixed (Linux minded) company. Opinions about Unity range from absolute disdain to unabashed “fanboyism.”

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Ubuntu Touch OTA-9 Might Be Delayed with One Day Due to a Unity 8 Security Bug

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Ubuntu

Łukasz Zemczak sent today he's regular daily report to inform us all about the latest work done by the Ubuntu Touch developers in preparation for the upcoming OTA-9 software update.

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uNav GPS navigator for Ubuntu Touch Receives Several Improvements

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Ubuntu

uNav, a turn-by-turn GPS navigator and map viewer for Ubuntu Touch, has been upgraded once more, and a number of features have been improved.

uNav is one of the most downloaded applications on the Ubuntu phones, but that's not all that surprising, given the fact that it's also the only one of its kind. The developer of uNav has put in a lot of effort into building this application, and it's really impressive what he has managed to do with it, especially since it's not ported from another platform or based on another project.

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BQ is about to drop an Ubuntu tablet that doubles as a PC

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Ubuntu

After partnering with Meizu and Canonical last year to make Ubuntu-powered phones a reality, Spanish hardware company BQ has revealed that it’s working on the world’s first Ubuntu tablet PC and that it’s preparing to show off the device at next month’s Mobile World Congress (MWC).

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Ubuntu Touch OTA-9 Is Now Hunted by a Strange Bug That Might Be Fixed in OTA-9.5

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Ubuntu

We've been informed earlier by Łukasz Zemczak of Canonical about the latest work done by the Ubuntu Touch developers in preparation for the upcoming OTA-9 software update, due for release on January 27, 2016.

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Mark Shuttleworth's Opening Keynote at UbuCon Summit 2016

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Ubuntu

The first UbuCon Summit event is taking place these days, between January 21 and 22, at the SCALE 14x Southern California Linux Expo conference in Pasadena, California, United States of America (USA), hosted at Pasadena Convention Center.

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File Roller Open Source Archive Manager Now Supports Ubuntu's Click Packages

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Ubuntu

It has been a while since we last heard something from the development team of the File Roller archive manager, which is used by default in the GNOME desktop environment and any GNU/Linux operating system that uses the GNOME Stack.

File Roller 3.20 has just entered development for the upcoming GNOME 3.20 desktop environment, and its development team managed to release the first milestone a couple of days ago. As usual, we managed to get our hands on the internal changelog for File Roller 3.19.1 to share with our readers some details about the newly implemented features.

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More in Tux Machines

FOSS in Education

  • Open source is now ready to compete with Mathematica for use in the classroom
    When I think about what makes SageMath different, one of the most fundamental things is that it was created by people who use it every day. It was created by people doing research math, by people teaching math at universities, and by computer programmers and engineers using it for research. It was created by people who really understand computational problems because we live them. We understand the needs of math research, teaching courses, and managing an open source project that users can contribute to and customize to work for their own unique needs.
  • The scarcity of college graduates with FOSS experience
    In the education track at SCALE 14x in Pasadena, Gina Likins spoke about the surprisingly difficult task of getting information about open-source development practices into undergraduate college classrooms. That scarcity makes it hard to find new college graduates who have experience with open source. Although the conventional wisdom is that open source "is everywhere," the college computer-science (CS) or software-engineering (SE) classroom has proven to be a tough nut to crack—and may remain so for quite some time. Likins works on Red Hat's University Outreach team—a group that does not do recruiting, she emphasized. Rather, the team travels to campuses around the United States and engages with teachers, administrators, and students about open source in the classroom. The surprise is how little open source one finds, at least in CS and SE degrees. Employers expect graduates to be familiar with open-source projects and tools (e.g., using Git, bug trackers, and so forth), she said, and incoming students report expecting to find it in the curriculum, but it remains a rarity.
  • A Selection of Talks from FOSDEM 2016
    It's that time of the year where I go to FOSDEM (Free and Open Source Software Developers' European Meeting). The keynotes and the maintracks are very good, with good presentations and contents.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

  • Ubuntu Studio 16.04 Wallpaper Contest
    This poll is for the selection of 16 desktop wallpapers for Ubuntu Studio 16.04.
  • Debian LTS Work January 2016
    This was my ninth month as a Freexian sponsored LTS contributor. I was assigned 8 hours for the month of January. My time this month was spent preparing updates for clamav and the associated libclamunrar for squeeze and wheezy. For wheezy, I’ve only helped a little, mostly I worked on squeeze.
  • Welcome to Parsix GNU/Linux 8.5r0 Release Notes
    Parsix GNU/Linux is a live and installation DVD based on Debian. Our goal is to provide a ready to use and easy to install desktop and laptop optimized operating system based on Debian's stable branch and the latest stable release of GNOME desktop environment. Users can easily install extra software packages from Parsix APT repositories. Our annual release cycle consists of two major and four minor versions. We have our own software repositories and build servers to build and provide all the necessary updates and missing features in Debian stable branch.

Raspberry Pi/Devices

  • Another new Raspbian release
  • How do geeks control their lights?
    We made this setup to test our capabilities to control Arduino with Raspberry Pi in our upcoming big project. We did not have spare keyboard and screen for RPi, so we ended up ssh-ing into the Pi via Wi-Fi router.
  • How To Start A Pirate FM Radio Station Using Your Raspberry Pi
    Continuing our Raspberry DIY series, we are here with a simple tutorial that tells you how to start your own pirate FM station using Raspberry Pi. Take a look and broadcast your tunes — anytime, anywhere.
  • Tizen 3.0 on the Raspberry Pi 2
    The Samsung Open Source Group is currently in the process of porting Tizen 3.0 to the Raspberry Pi 2 (RPi2). Our goal is to create a device capable of running a fully-functional Tizen 3.0 operating system, and we chose the RPi2 because it is the most popular single-board computer with more than 5 million sold. There are numerous Linux Distributions that run on the RPi2 including Raspbian, Pidora, Ubuntu, OSMC, and OpenElec , and we will add Tizen to this lineup. We face a number of obstacles in accomplishing this, but we hope this will serve as a model for bringing Tizen to a broader range of hardware platforms.
  • Embedded 14nm Atom x5-E8000 debuts on Congatec boards
    Intel released several new 14nm Atom SoCs, including an embedded, quad-core x5-E8000 part with 5W TDP, now available in four Congatec boards. Intel released the Atom x5-E8000, the first truly embedded system-on-chip using its 14nm Airmont architecture. Airmont is also the design that fuels Intel’s Celeron N3000 “Braswell” SoCs and its mobile-focused Atom x5 and x7 Z8000 “Cherry Trail” SoCs. The x5-E8000 is the heir to the 22nm Bay Trail generation Atom E3800 family.

Android Leftovers