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Ubuntu

Lubuntu 16.10 Lands as a Bugfix Release That Prepares the Distro for LXQt

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Ubuntu

Lubuntu 16.10 is the last official flavor announced as part of yesterday's Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) final release, and we'd love to tell you a little bit about what's new and what's coming next for the distribution.

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Ubuntu Studio 16.10 Released with Ardour 5.0, Blender 2.77a, and LMMS 1.1.3

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Ubuntu

As part of today's Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) release, Canonical also unveiled the new version of the Ubuntu Studio operating system, an official flavor targeted at general multimedia production.

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Ubuntu Kylin 16.10 Arrives for Chinese-Speaking Users, Here's What's New

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Ubuntu

Today, October 13, 2016, was an important day for Ubuntu users, as Canonical launched the release of Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), along with most of its officially recognized derivatives.

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More on *buntu 16.10

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 16.10 Provides Incremental Linux Desktop Improvements

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Ubuntu

Canonical, the lead commercial sponsor behind the open-source Ubuntu Linux operating system, is set to debut its second major milestone release of 2016 on Oct. 13. The Ubuntu 16.10 release is named Yakkety Yak and follows the 16.04 Xenial Xerus release, which became generally available on April 21 and is a Long Term Support (LTS) release. The 16.10 release, however, is what Canonical considers to be a standard release. With an LTS, Canonical provides support for five years, while a standard release is supported only for nine months. In many respects, Ubuntu 16.10 is an incremental release and does not provide major new features, but rather a set of updated packages and minor improvements. Among the updated software are the open-source LibreOffice 5.2 productivity suite and the Firefox 48 web browser. Also of particular note is the fact that Ubuntu 16.10 is based on the latest Linux 4.8 kernel, which provides advanced hardware support and improved performance. The Ubuntu 16.10 milestone also provides a preview for the Unity 8 desktop. In this slide show, eWEEK takes a look at some of the features in the Ubuntu 16.04 Linux release.

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Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, the Release Candidate of Black Lab Linux 8.0 Is Here

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Linux
Ubuntu

After informing us earlier today, October 12, 2016, about the fact that the Black Lab Linux project has become a commercial product, Black Lab Software CEO Robert Dohnert announced the release of Black Lab Linux 8.0 RC1.

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Clear Linux Continues To Maintain Slight Graphics Lead Over Ubuntu 16.10

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

Back in April I did tests showing how Intel's Clear Linux distribution showed much potential for HD/Iris Graphics performance, something that intrigued many Phoronix readers since Clear Linux would generally be seen as a workstation/cloud/container-optimized Linux distribution and something with not much emphasis on the desktop or gaming. Those earlier tests were with Ubuntu 16.04, bur with Ubuntu 16.10 coming out this week, here are some fresh tests of Clear Linux and Ubuntu Yakkety Yak on an Skylake HD Graphics system.

For curiosity sake, I ran some fresh Ubuntu 16.10 vs. Clear Linux (10820) benchmarks on the same Core i5 6600K system with an MSI Z170A GAMING PRO motherboard, 16GB DDR4-2133MHz memory, and 256GB TS256GSSD370S SSD. The mid-range i5-6600K is equipped with HD Graphics 530.

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Ubuntu 16.04, re-tested six months later

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Six months in between releases is just too short of a period for meaningful, well-tested releases. As soon as issues are polished in one edition with a cumulative fix edition, there's a new version of Ubuntu and the headless chicken race starts again. We will soon have 16.10, and it will most likely suck, because there will be a million little problems that could not have been fully checked in time, but schedule be schedule, release we must. Woe any delays!

Ubuntu 16.04.1 Xenial Xerus is a better release than the GA flop, but it is still not good enough to recommend. The networking stack sucks more than what Trusty does, and overall, it is slower, less responsive, less mature, less complete. It is also not as good as Fedora, and there are some big regressions slash sad neglect in the software stack that tells me the whole idea of the Linux desktop is slowly dying. People did not like the Amazon store and the payware options in USC, but it was a first sane step to offering a mature version of Ubuntu to serious people. Alas, zealots shot it down, because they value pride over progress. And now what is left is a semi-functional distro that is a pale shadow of its former self.

So yes, it works better than before. 6/10 or so. Not even remotely close to the glory of the Trusty release, which heaped accolade upon accolade, accomplishment after another. Trusty just did everything. It was and still is awesome. Xerus is just weak. And even the post-fiasco release is still somewhat lame. Not worth upgrading. Xenial is in denial. I shall now patiently wait to see what doom the Yakety Sax is going to bring us. Ought to happen very very soon, and the timing of this article couldn't have been any more perfect. Stay tuned.

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The Open Source Era: A Q&A With Canonical CEO Jane Silber

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Interviews
Ubuntu

Canonical, a 750-person company with employees in more than 42 countries around the world, is the driving force behind Ubuntu open-source software. Although Canonical and Ubuntu are well-known and well-respected among hardcore technologists, most consumers have probably never heard of either.

This is an unfortunate reality of open-source software. Products and projects dedicated to democratizing technology by making computer use free and fair for everyone often fly under the radar. Whether Canonical and Ubuntu become synonymous with the general consumer is largely dependent on whether or not consumers move away from traditional device usage. Can Canonical's vision for a converged computing experience across a spectrum devices make the Canonical name as synonymous with desktop users as it is with users of its enterprise cloud and application performance management (APM) solutions?

I chatted with Canonical CEO Jane Silber, a remarkable executive with a rich technological background, over email about the challenges Canonical faces in consumer computing and even television, as well as how the company plans to maintain its status in the enterprise cloud and software markets.

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7 cool little open source projects that stood out in 2016

In the early days of the open source movement, a lot of the attention was on operating systems, and later on large content management systems. These days, containers are mentioned regularly even in mainstream news outlets. The big tech stories are great, but they miss the other great activity in the niches of the open source space. I've rounded up seven interesting lesser-known projects from the past year. You can see more articles about projects like this in my Nooks and Crannies column. Read more

RaspArch, the Arch Linux Remix for Raspberry Pi 3 SBCs, Now Shipping with Yaourt

After announcing the release of a new version of his Ubuntu-based ExTiX Linux operating system for Intel Compute Stick devices, Arne Exton has announced today the availability of RaspArch Build 161205. RaspArch is a remix of Arch Linux ARM for Raspberry Pi 3 and Raspberry Pi 2 single-board computers, and the latest release is shipping with the long-term supported Linux 4.4.35 kernel and the latest package versions released upstream as of December 5, 2016. "When you have installed RaspArch to your Micro SD Card you can use the system like any other Arch Linux system, i.e. install new programs, etc," said Arne Exton in the release announcement. "Arch motto is KISS (Keep It Simple Stupid). RaspArch uses kernel 4.4.35-1-ARCH and the LXDE Desktop environment." Read more

Gentoo-Based Porteus Kiosk 4.2 Released with Linux Kernel 4.4.36, Firefox 45.5.1

Porteus Solutions, through Tomasz Jokiel, announced today the release and immediate availability of Porteus Kiosk 4.2.0, the latest stable version of the free and open source Gentoo-based kiosk operating system for web terminals. Powered by the latest long-term supported Linux 4.4.36 kernel, Porteus Kiosk 4.2.0 ships with some of the latest and greatest GNU/Linux technologies and Open Source software projects, including the recently released X.Org Server 1.18.4 display server, as well as the Mozilla Firefox 45.5.1 ESR and Google Chrome 54.0.2840.100 web browsers. Read more