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Ubuntu

Ubuntu Leftovers

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Ubuntu
  • PT Biznet Gio Nusantara Launches NEO Cloud with Canonical BootStack

    NEO Cloud is built on OpenStack technology, the first cloud computing service in Indonesia providing Multiple Availability Zones and Multiple Regions. NEO Cloud will be a more reliable and secure cloud computing service for Indonesian app developers across various level of businesses, from SME, Startups, to Corporations.

  • Launching Fingbox: from idea to distribution in under a year

    If you’re using a network security and scanning tool at home then there is a strong chance you have adopted Fing – the free network scanner for iOS and Android with over 25 million downloads. Following the success of their app, the founders of Fing decided to launch their first hardware product called Fingbox. Less than a year ago, Fing kicked off an Indiegogo campaign to raise the necessary funds and today sees the public availability on Amazon (in US and Canada initially) for their new device, Fingbox. With over USD $1.6m raised, all 20,000 backers have already received their Fingbox devices.

  • ucaresystem core 4.2 released with bugfix for Linux Mint and EOL upgrades for Ubuntu

    Just a quick update, I have pushed a new version of ucaresystem core to the PPA. The new release fixes a bug in Linux Mint and also adds a new feature – EOL Upgrades

  • No KDEing! Linux Mint is Killing its KDE Edition

    The KDE version of Linux Mint 18.3 that will be released soon will be the last to feature a KDE Plasma Edition. Which means Linux Mint 19 and above will not have KDE edition.

Ubuntu: Mir, Ubuntu Server, Ubuntu Core and More

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Ubuntu

System76 Galago Pro Review with Pop!_OS — Is Pop!_OS Just Another Distribuntu?

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Reviews
Ubuntu

But what really drew me in was the stunning iconography, which was particularly surprising. Despite Linux being synonymous with customization and there being too many icon sets to count, many of them, while attractive in their own right, fail to embody what we expect in a professional or commercial product. That’s not to say that their artwork itself is unprofessional, but many are intended to be playful or are created with a particular style in mind that is not typical of professional environments. System76 has created a stunning set of icons that don’t undermine the power of Linux and will hopefully attract professionals from all fields to try out Linux as a part of their productivity suite.

The final release of Pop!_OS has been released, and since I encountered no bugs while playing with the alpha, I’d be hard-pressed to believe there are any show-stoppers in the final release, so I highly recommend you give it a try and show your non-Linux using friends how cost-free doesn’t necessarily mean aesthetic-free.

Find the high-resolution Golago Pro pictures here on Google Drive.

Did you find this System76 Golago Pro review interesting? Don’t forget to share your views with us.

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GNOME Project Welcomes Canonical and Ubuntu to GNOME Foundation Advisory Board

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GNOME
Ubuntu

With the release of the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, Canonical replaced their Unity user interface with the GNOME desktop environment, and now they're looking to sponsor the project by becoming a member of the Advisory Board.

Among some powerful members of GNOME Foundation's Advisory Board, we can mention Google, FSF (Free Software Foundation), and Linux Foundation. And now, Canonical will also support the GNOME Project by providing funding and expert consultation.

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Also: Ubuntu Linux-maker Canonical joins GNOME Foundation advisory board

Canonical/Ubuntu Leftovers

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Server Development Summary – 31 Oct 2017

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list.

  • Juju GUI: get your users started with getstarted.md
  • MAAS 2.3.0 beta 3 released!

    I’m happy to announce that MAAS 2.3.0 Beta 3 has now been released and it is currently available in PPA and as a snap.

  • Online course about LXD containers
  • LXD Weekly Status #21: Console Attach, Distribution Work, & More

    Last week @brauner and @stgraber were traveling to Prague for the Open Source Summit Europe.
    We got the opportunity to talk about LXD, system containers and various bits of ongoing kernel work as well as meet with a number of our users and contributors!

    All this travel and conference time reduced our ability to do feature work this week, so we’ve mostly been reviewing contributions and pushing a number of bugfixes with things going back to normal this week.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 quick screenshot tour

    Ubuntu 17.10 is the newest version of this world famous Linux distribution, and this one is especially interesting because Canonical decided to dump its controversial Unity baby and use GNOME desktop environment instead.

Ubuntu Desktops Compared

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Ubuntu

The Ubuntu desktop has evolved a lot over the years. Ubuntu started off with GNOME 2, then moved onto Unity. From there, it came home to its roots with the GNOME 3 desktop. In this article, we'll look at the Ubuntu desktops and compare them.

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Ubuntu 14.04 To Ubuntu 17.10 RadeonSI OpenGL Performance

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Ubuntu

As part of the multi-year comparisons for marking AMD's open-source strategy being 10 years old, here's a look back with fresh OpenGL Linux gaming benchmarks from Ubuntu 14.04 through Ubuntu 17.10 using a Radeon HD 7950 graphics card with the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver. There's also a similar comparison with a Radeon R9 Fury.

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Debian and Derivatives

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Building packages without (fake)root

    Turns out that it is surprisingly easy to build most packages without (fake)root.

  • Elive 3.0 Is One Step Closer to Reality as Latest Beta Introduces Many Goodies

    The developers of the Debian-based Elive GNU/Linux distribution leveraging the Enlightenment desktop environment are still trying to finish the major Elive 3.0 release, and they just published a new Beta.

    Elive 2.9.12 Beta is here almost two months after the previous beta (versioned 2.9.8), and it looks like it's a big one, adding an extra layer of performance improvements to the desktop and window effects with up to 194%, as well as to video playback, which is now smoother than on previous betas.

    Elive's graphical installer, yes the one you don't have to pay to use it anymore, has been refactored in this new beta release to include a validator of characters for usernames, passwords, and hostnames, make the entire installation process a lot easier than before, and also fix numerous bugs, especially for the built-in browser.

  • And We’re Off: Development Begins on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS ‘Bionic Beaver’

    Canonical’s Matthias Klose shared the news on the Ubuntu development mailing list.

    The first few weeks of every Ubuntu development cycle is spent syncing key packages from upstream sources, plumbing in the base infrastructure on which future changes lay, and so on.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Release Schedule

    For those of you unaware Ubuntu’s April (xx.04) releases follow a 27-week schedule (as opposed to October releases’ 25 week schedule, owing to the little matter of Xmas and New Year).

    During the cycle time 2 alpha milestones, 2 beta milestones and 1 release candidate build are issued for public testing. Ubuntu flavors often take advantage of all of these.

  • Help test Plasma 5.8.8 LTS and Krita 3.3.1 for Kubuntu Backports!

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • How Can Debian Turn Disagreement into Something that Makes us Stronger

    Recently, when asked to engage with the Debian Technical Committee, a maintainer chose to orphan their package rather than discuss the issue brought before the committee. In another decision earlier this year, a maintainer orphaned their package indicating a lack of respect for the approach being taken and the process. Unfortunately, this joins an ever longer set of issues where people walk away from the TC process disheartened and upset.

    For me personally the situations where maintainers walked away from the process were hard. People I respect and admire were telling me that they were unwilling to participate in our dispute resolution process. In one case the maintainer explicitly did not respect a process I had been heavily involved in. As someone who values understanding and build a team, I feel disappointed and hurt thinking about this.

  • Full Circle Magazine #126
  • Ubuntu Desktop Weekly Update: GNOME Fixes & New Snaps

    I’ll be starting the weekly round-up posts again now that the release is out and 18.04 is getting under way. At this early stage in the development cycle we’re spending a week or so tidying up the loose ends from 17.10, SRUing the important fixes that we’ve found, getting ready to sync new packages from Debian, and generally doing the groundwork to give us a clear run at 18.04. As you know, 18.04 will be an LTS release and so we will be focusing on stability and reliability this cycle, as well as a few new features. I’ll give a more detailed view into 18.04 in the coming weeks.

Canonical to Focus Mostly on Stability and Reliability for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu Desktop Director Will Cooke shares some information about what Canonical's plans are for the next LTS (Long Term Support) release of Ubuntu, which is scheduled for release on April 26, 2018. As expected, they'll focus mostly on stability and reliability, but it looks like there will be some new features added as well during the development cycle of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

"At this early stage in the development cycle we’re spending a week or so tidying up the loose ends from 17.10, SRUing the important fixes that we’ve found, getting ready to sync new packages from Debian," said Will Cooke in his latest weekly report. "As you know, 18.04 will be an LTS release and so we will be focusing on stability and reliability this cycle, as well as a few new features."

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Intel Graphics On Ubuntu: GNOME vs. KDE vs. Xfce vs. Unity vs. LXDE

For those wondering how the Intel (U)HD Graphics compare for games and other graphical benchmarks between desktop environments in 2018, here are some fresh benchmarks using GNOME Shell on X.Org/Wayland, KDE Plasma 5, Xfce, Unity 7, and LXDE. Read more

Linux Kernel 4.15 Delayed Until Next Week as Linus Torvalds Announces Ninth RC

It's not every day that you see a ninth Release Candidate in the development cycle of a new Linux kernel branch, but here we go, and we can only blame it on those pesky Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities that affect us all, putting billions of devices at risk of attacks. That, and the fact that things haven't calmed down since last week's eight Release Candidate, which was supposed to be the last for the upcoming series. According to Linus Torvalds, there are still has some networking fixes pending, and there's also a very subtle boot bug that was discovered the other day. Read more Also: Linux 4.15 Goes Further Into Overtime: Linux 4.15-rc9

Review: Ubuntu MATE 17.10

Ubuntu MATE 17.10 is a solid release with a few minor caveats about the Mutiny layout. The Traditional MATE layout is very nice, but Mutiny still needs some work. For users who want the classic GNOME 2 look-and-feel, Ubuntu MATE is an excellent choice. However, Unity users looking for a Unity-like experience should still give Ubuntu MATE with the Mutiny layout a try, but need to be aware that it does have some issues and it won't work exactly like Unity. The Contemporary layout is also an option for Unity users, but is even further removed from the Unity experience than Mutiny is. Read more

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