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Ubuntu

GPD Pocket Ubuntu Editon Review

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Netbooks are often ridiculed as a solution looking for a problem but they are also regarded as the ancestors of present day Chromebooks and “cloudbooks”. With the resurgence of these more modern but still low-performance devices, it might seem that the netbook is due for a revival as well. Or so that seems to be the proposition GPD makes with its almost literal Pocket computer. But does that make more sense now than it did before, especially in an age of powerful smartphones? We take the Ubuntu Edition of the GPD Pocket for a good and thorough testing to find out.

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Ubuntu: *Ubuntu 17.10 Beta 2, 32-Bit, ARTIK, and IoT modules

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) Final Beta Ready for Download, Here's What's New

    Canonical today released the Final Beta release of its forthcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, allowing anyone to see what they prepared for this new Ubuntu version that will be hitting the streets on October 19, 2017.

    First and foremost, Ubuntu 17.10 is shipping with a refreshed desktop environment, powered by the latest GNOME 3.26 release, highly customized by Canonical to resemble the look and feel of its deprecated Unity user interface. This is also the first release of Ubuntu to ship without Unity in more than six years.

  • An Ubuntu Kernel Spin Of AMDGPU DC "drm-next-4.15-dc"

    Yesterday was the very exciting news of the AMDGPU DC code finally being called for pulling to DRM-Next for integration in the Linux 4.15 kernel. So far it's looking like that will indeed happen for Linux 4.15 assuming Linus Torvalds has no objections. If you want to test out this kernel for HDMI/DP audio, Radeon RX Vega display support, atomic mode-setting, or other modern features, here is an Ubuntu kernel spin.

  • Canonical to end 32-bit installation options with Ubuntu 17.10 Linux

    Ubuntu, arguably the most popular (or, at least, widely used) desktop distribution of Linux, is to drop support for 32-bit installations in favour of 64-bit - some 14 years after the introduction of the AMD64 instruction set.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 for desktop won't ship a 32-bit version

    Beginning with Ubuntu 17.10, due next month, Canonical will stop building 32-bit versions of its operating system for desktop machines. The move has been pushed by Dimitri Ledkov, a familiar name which cropped up in a Neowin article last year discussing the same topic. If you have a 32-bit machine running Ubuntu you should probably stick with Ubuntu 16.04 and start looking for a replacement device.

  • Ubuntu to stop releasing 32-bit desktop ISOs

    But it seems like not all that many people are using recent builds of Ubuntu to do that… because the developers have decided to make it a bit tougher to install the popular Linux distro on computers with 32-bit processors.

  • Samsung selects Ubuntu 16.04 as primary Linux distro for some ARTIK IoT modules

    Next month, Ubuntu 17.10 will be released. Even after that release, version 16.04 will remain the most recent LTS version. If you aren't familiar, LTS stands for "Long Term Support," which quite literally means it is supported by Canonical for a longer period of time. For instance, Ubuntu 16.04 will be supported until 2021, while the newer 17.04 is only supported until 2018.

    Today, Canonical announces that Samsung has selected version 16.04 LTS of the operating system as the primary Linux distro for some of the ARTIK internet of things modules. This is a smart choice by Samsung, because long support is preferable to bleeding edge for an IoT device.

  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Now Primary Linux OS of Samsung ARTIK 5 and 7 Smart IoT Modules

    Canonical recently partnered with Samsung to bring its Ubuntu Linux operating system to the Samsung ARTIK 5 and 7 family of smart IoT (Internet of Things) modules used in a wide-range of appliances.

    Samsung decided to enable the long-term supported Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial Xerus) operating system as primary GNU/Linux distribution for its Samsung ARTIK platform instead of the existing OS, which wasn't mentioned in the press announcement. Choosing Ubuntu as primary Linux distro is a great move as it lets ARTIK’s developers access various of the supported connectivity options, such as Zigbee, Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth.

  • Canonical's eyes are on IoT

    When Mark Shuttleworth founded Canonical in 2004, the idea behind the company was simple – promote the use of Ubuntu Linux as a desktop operating system. Fourteen years later, things have gotten a lot more complicated, as the prominent open source software vendor eyes the IoT market.

    Canonical’s still flying the flag for desktop Linux, but the company’s real business is in the cloud – it claims that Ubuntu accounts for about 60% of all Linux instances in the major public clouds – and it’s hoping to make its mark in the next-buzziest part of the technology sector, the Internet of Things.

    According to Mike Bell, Canonical’s executive vice president for devices and IoT, the way businesses have begun to develop software for IoT devices has been advantageous for them – companies have started to take server or desktop distros and cut them down into software that works on embedded devices. Since Ubuntu is a familiar and well-known framework, it was a natural choice as a starting place.

Ubuntu: Ubuntu Drops 32-bit, Comes to Samsung ARTIK Gateway, Turned Into System76's Pop!_OS Beta

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Ubuntu
  • Canonical drops 32-bit Ubuntu Desktop Live ISOs
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS selected for Samsung ARTIK Gateway modules

    The Samsung ARTIK platform is a fully integrated chip to cloud and production-ready Internet of Things solution, designed to help companies accelerate their product development process, reduce time to market, and improve total cost of ownership for their IoT products. Through the new partnership, the Samsung ARTIK 5 and 7 family of modules will now incorporate Ubuntu 16.04 as its primary Linux distribution, combining Ubuntu distribution with ARTIK customization, platform software and the ARTIK integrated development environment.

  • System76 Pop!_OS Beta Ubuntu-based Linux distribution now available to download

    Next month, a new era of Ubuntu begins. Unity is dead, and GNOME 3 takes over as the default desktop environment. While this change was for the best, it was still shocking for many. For a company like System76, for instance, that sells computers pre-loaded with Ubuntu, this was problematic. Why? Well, the company essentially lost control of the overall user experience by relying on vanilla Ubuntu. It was being forced to follow Canonical's path.

    To solve this, and regain some control, System76 has been developing its own operating system called "Pop!_OS." No, it is not reinventing the wheel here -- it will still use Ubuntu as a base, and GNOME will be the desktop environment. The company is customizing the operating system, however, with things like fonts, themes, and icons, to create something truly unique. This could lead to an improved user experience. Today, the first official beta of the operating system becomes available for download.

Ubuntu: 32-bit, Paper Theme And Icons, HUD on Artful MATE Beta, and ULauncher

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Ubuntu
  • It’s Official: Ubuntu 17.10 Is Killing 32-Bit Desktop ISO
  • Ubuntu 17.10 won't have a 32-bit installation option

    LINUX DISTRO of choice for many, Ubuntu, has announced it is to drop support for 32-bit installations in favour of pure 64-bit loveliness.

    Starting with the upcoming release of Ubuntu 17.10, due next month, Ubuntu will be putting into action a request from Canonical dude Dimitri John Ledkov, reports OMG Ubuntu.

  • Paper Theme And Icons Looks Great On Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Paper theme and icons are designed for Linux desktop environment, this suite is inspired by Material design created by Sam Hewitt, icons are based around the use of bold colors and simple geometric shapes. Each icon has been meticulously designed for pixel-perfect viewing at any size. Both theme and icons are lightweight and well-managed doesn't eat system resources, the theme is modern and icons with most flat design and minimal use of shadows for depth. Paper has been developed primarily with modern GTK3 (GNOME-based) desktop environments in mind, legacy-toolkit and GTK2 environments will not provide an ideal experience, as much of the visual design relies on modern GTK3+ widgets. This suite is released under the terms the GNU General Public License GPL v3.

  • The New HUD on Artful MATE Beta

    The Heads-Up Display (or, HUD) is now a star feature on Ubuntu MATE 17.10 Beta. It got improved a lot on Beta and it's amusing! On Alpha version, the HUD appears after some taps on Super+Alt buttons, and this would be difficult for many Unity users. But now on Beta version, the HUD appears by single tap on Alt button, making it easier for us and closer to Unity's HUD. The big change is the HUD is now placed locally on every window! See the GIF animation and pictures below.

  • ULauncher: A Light And Fast App Launcher For Linux

    Available for Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty/16.04 Xenial/14.04 Trusty/Linux Mint 18/17/other Ubuntu derivatives

Ubuntu Is Dropping 32-Bit Images, But the Rest of the Flavors Will Keep Them

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Ubuntu

In a follow-up email to a discussion from May when Ubuntu Desktop team discussed the possibility of removal of the 32-bit (i386) installation images from the servers, developer Dimitri John Ledkov confirmed the decision today.

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Also: Ubuntu 17.10 Will Drop The 32-bit Desktop ISO

Ubuntu: Ubuntu 17.10 Will Drop The 32-bit Desktop ISO and More

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Ubuntu
  • Change of scope and target market for i386

    Please action the below and remove Ubuntu Desktop i386 daily-live images from the release manifest for Beta and Final milestones of 17.10 and therefore do not ship ubuntu-desktop-i386.iso artifact for 17.10.

    As a followup to this thread it has been confirmed that argumentation below is sound, and furthermore there is no longer any effective qa or testing of the desktop product on actual i386 hardware (explicitly non x86_64 CPUs).

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Will Drop The 32-bit Desktop ISO

    Ubuntu will no longer be producing a desktop i386 ISO beginning with the soon-to-be-released Ubuntu 17.10.

    Dimitri John Ledkov of Canonical has conveyed to the Ubuntu release team to remove the Ubuntu Desktop i386 daily builds, beta, and final. There will no longer be any "ubuntu-desktop-i386.iso" produced. There is no longer any effective QA or testing being done on the Ubuntu i386 desktop image on actual 32-bit-only hardware. As well, most x86 systems in the past decade support x86_64, Ubuntu modern doesn't run too well on dated hardware, etc.

  • Four steps to mobilising legacy OpenStack and escaping StuckStack

    According to figures from the OpenStack Foundation, just 20 per cent of users are using the latest version of the software. Companies that fall to far behind updates risk becoming stuck on an older version of OpenStack, leaving themselves in danger of higher costs, diminishing agility and reduced security. We call this condition StuckStack, and have written an ebook to help you escape this trap.

    All software needs regular upgrades to work effectively. The OpenStack Foundation distributes regular updates and a new release every six months to ensure that the software is up-to-date with technology developments and has the features that users require.

Kubuntu Artful Aardvark (17.10) and Ubuntu

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KDE
Ubuntu
  • Kubuntu Artful Aardvark (17.10) Beta 2 testing

    Artful Aardvark (17.10) Beta 2 images are now available for testing.

    The Kubuntu team will be releasing 17.10 in October. The final Beta 2 milestone will be available on September 28.

    This is the first spin in preparation for the Beta 2 pre-release. Kubuntu Beta pre-releases are NOT recommended for:

  • Ubuntu Dock Now Supports Progress Bars and Badge Counts

    Support for the Unity Launcher API has managed to squeak in to the Ubuntu Dock package on Ubuntu 17.10 before the user-interface freezes takes place.

  • LXD Weekly Status #16

    The main highlight of this week was the release of LXD 2.18.

    We’ve otherwise been busy tracking down and fixing a number of issues, extended the user-agent string that LXD uses when talking to our image server and been working on a number of fixes for LXC 2.1.

    We’re also making good progress on the stable release branches and hope to get to tag a number of stable bugfix releases next week.

  •  

Ubuntu Dock Now Shows Badges and Progress Bars for Pinned Apps on Ubuntu 17.10

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Ubuntu

With only two days left until the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system hits the Final Beta milestone, developers are still working on adding finishing touches to this release, and they've again improved the Ubuntu Dock.

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Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 14

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GNOME
Ubuntu

One of the latest thing we wanted to work on as we highlighted on our previous posts is the notification for new emails or download experience on the Shell. We already do ship the KStatusNotifier extension for application indicator, but need a way to signal the user (even if you are not looking at the screen when this happens) for new emails, IM or download/copy progress.

Andrea stepped up on this and worked with Dash to Dock upstream to implement the unity API for this. Working with them, as usual, was pleasing and we got the green flag that it’s going to merge to master, with possibly some tweaks, which will make this work available to every Dash to Dock users! It means that after this update, Thunderbird is handily showing the number of unread emails you have in your inbox, thanks to thunderbird-gnome-support that we seeded back with Sébastien.

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Ubuntu Touch OTA-2 Rolls Out for Ubuntu Phones, Including Nexus 4 & Nexus 7 2013

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Ubuntu

The UBports community has released this past weekend the second OTA (Over-the-Air) update to supported Ubuntu Phone devices, bringing support for some old devices that were requested by the community, as well as a set of new features.

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More in Tux Machines

Early Returns on Firefox Quantum Point to Growth

When we set out to launch Firefox Quantum earlier this year, we knew we had a hugely improved product. It not only felt faster — with a look and feel that tested off the charts — it was measurably faster. Thanks to multiple changes under the hood, we doubled Firefox’s speed while using 30% less memory than Chrome. In less than a month, Firefox Quantum has already been installed by over 170M people around the world. We’re just getting started and early returns are super encouraging. Read more Also: Mozilla Joins Net Neutrality Blackout for ‘Break the Internet’ Day

Linux Foundation News

  • Juniper Networks Reinforces Longstanding Commitment to Open Source by Moving OpenContrail's Codebase to the Linux Foundation
    Juniper Networks (NYSE: JNPR), an industry leader in automated, scalable and secure networks, today further bolstered its support for open standards during its annual NXTWORK user conference, by announcing its intent to move the codebase for OpenContrail™, an open-source network virtualization platform for the cloud, to the Linux Foundation. Juniper first released its Juniper® Contrail® products as open sourced in 2013 and built a vibrant user and developer community around this project. Earlier this year, Juniper expanded the project's governance, creating an even more open, community-led effort to strengthen the project for its next growth phase. Adding OpenContrail's codebase to the Linux Foundation's networking projects will further its objective to grow the use of open source platforms in cloud ecosystems.
  • Hyperledger Hub Supports Open Source Blockchain Development
    Hyperledger is a global blockchain collaboration hub created and hosted by nonprofit The Linux Foundation. Its members are leaders in finance, banking, the Internet of Things, supply chains, manufacturing and technology. Now two years in, Hyperledger compares closely to the Ethereum Enterprise Alliance. Hyperledger is a hub for communities of software developers building blockchain frameworks and platforms. These developers, on the other hand, are a mix of individuals and teams from organizations around the world.
  • Linux Foundation Continues to Emphasize Diversity and Inclusiveness at Events
    This has been a pivotal year for Linux Foundation events. Our largest gatherings, which include Open Source Summit, Embedded Linux Conference, KubeCon + CloudNativeCon, Open Networking Summit, and Cloud Foundry Summit, attracted a combined 25,000 people from 4,500 different organizations globally. Attendance was up 25 percent over 2016. Linux Foundation events are often the only time that developers, maintainers, and other pros who contribute to Linux and other critical open source projects — like AGL, Kubernetes and Hyperledger to name a few — get together in person. Face-to-face meetings are crucial because they speed collaboration, engagement and innovation, improving the sustainability of projects over time.  

today's leftovers

  • Personal Backups with Duplicati on Linux
  • Flatpak'ed Epiphany Browser Becomes More Useful
    Epiphany 3.27.3 was released this morning as the newest release of GNOME's web browser in the road to the GNOME 3.28 stable desktop debut next March.
  • BlackArch 2017.12.11
    Today we released new BlackArch Linux ISOs. For details see the ChangeLog below. Here's the ChangeLog: update blackarch-installer to version 0.6.2 (most important change) included kernel 4.14.4 updated lot's of blackarch tools and packages updated all blackarch tools and packages updated all system packages bugfix release! (see blackarch-installer)
  • Latest Linux Distribution Releases (The Always Up-to-date List)
  • Mining cryptocurrency with Raspberry Pi and Storj
    I'm always looking for ways to map hot technologies to fun, educational classroom use. One of the most interesting, and potentially disruptive, technologies over the past few years is cryptocurrencies. In the early days, one could profitably mine some of the most popular cryptocurrencies, like Bitcoin, using a home PC. But as cryptocurrency mining has become more popular, thanks in part to dedicated mining hardware, the algorithms governing it have boosted computational complexity, making home PC mining often impractical, unprofitable, and environmentally unwise.
  • Huawei Collaborated with the Developers of Phoenix OS for the Mate 10’s Easy Projection Feature
    Though the company has virtually no presence in the United States, Huawei is a top 3 smartphone manufacturer in the world. Its subsidiary, Honor, aims to penetrate the Indian market with budget smartphones. Elsewhere, Huawei recently launched the Huawei Mate 10 and Mate 10 Pro in several markets around the world, and rumors have it the device will launch in the United States as well. Apart from the AI features powered by the company’s HiSilicon Kirin 970 SoC, one of the company’s most publicized features is Easy Projection. While not as powerful as Samsung DeX, it brings a desktop OS-like experience without needing to purchase an expensive accessory. Huawei is pushing the feature on its flagship devices, though there’s something about Easy Projection that hasn’t really been mentioned in the press yet. Behind Huawei’s Easy Projection feature is a relatively unheard of player—Beijing Chaozhuo Technology, developers of Phoenix OS.
  • Namaste ! (on the road to Swatantra 2017)
    I’ll have the pleasure to give a talk about GCompris, and another one about Synfig studio. It’s been a long time since I didn’t talk about the latter, but since Konstantin Dmitriev and the Morevna team were not available, I’ll do my best to represent Synfig there.
  • #PeruRumboGSoC2018 – Session 4
    We celebrated yesterday another session of the local challenge 2017-2 “PeruRumboGSoC2018”. It was held at the Centro Cultural Pedro Paulet of FIEE UNI. GTK on C was explained during the fisrt two hours of the morning based on the window* exercises from my repo to handle some widgets such as windows, label and buttons.
  • Chrome 63 revamps Bookmark Manager w/ Material Design on Mac, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS
    Chrome 63 began rolling out to Android and desktop browsers last week with the usual security fixes and new developer features. On the latter platform, this update introduces Material Design to the Bookmark Manager. Several versions ago, Google began updating various aspects of the browser with Material Design, including History, Downloads, and Settings. Like the Flags page for enabling experiments and in-development features, which Google also revamped in version 63, the Bookmark Manager (Menu > Bookmarks > Bookmark Manager) adopts the standard Materials UI elements. This includes an app bar that houses a large search bar. It adopts the same dark blue theme and includes various Material animations and flourishes.
  • ExpressVPN Unveils Industry’s First Suite of Open-Source Tools to Test for Privacy and Security Leaks
  • New format in GIMP: HGT
    Lately a recurrent contributor to the GIMP project (Massimo Valentini) contributed a patch to support HGT files. From this initial commit, since I found this data quite cool, I improved the support a bit (auto-detection of the variants and special-casing in particular, as well as making an API for scripts). So what is HGT? That’s topography data basically just containing elevation in meters of various landscape (HGT stands for “height“), gathered by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) run by various space agencies (NASA, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, German and Italian space agencies…).
  • What You Need To Know About The Intel Management Engine
    Over the last decade, Intel has been including a tiny little microcontroller inside their CPUs. This microcontroller is connected to everything, and can shuttle data between your hard drive and your network adapter. It’s always on, even when the rest of your computer is off, and with the right software, you can wake it up over a network connection. Parts of this spy chip were included in the silicon at the behest of the NSA. In short, if you were designing a piece of hardware to spy on everyone using an Intel-branded computer, you would come up with something like the Intel Managment Engine. Last week, researchers [Mark Ermolov] and [Maxim Goryachy] presented an exploit at BlackHat Europe allowing for arbitrary code execution on the Intel ME platform. This is only a local attack, one that requires physical access to a machine. The cat is out of the bag, though, and this is the exploit we’ve all been expecting. This is the exploit that forces Intel and OEMs to consider the security implications of the Intel Management Engine. What does this actually mean?

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