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Ubuntu

Ubuntu Phone used by 60+ year olds

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Ubuntu

Overall, BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Phone fared decently in the hands of people who probably constitute the least prioritized demographic for the development and product teams over at BQ and Canonical. Essentially, this is still a beta nerd toy, and yet, it didn't draw hatred or anger with the unlikely pair of victims. In fact, that is probably the highest accolade one can pile on a brand new device trying to edge its way into a shark-infested, saturated market of mobile providers.

It's not perfect, and my tech-savvy eyes sees far more faults than a casual user, which is often how it is. That also explains why you cannot really fully trust techies to review products, not unless they can disassociate their geeky knowledge from the end-user mission. For most people, this means good sound quality, good signal reception, the ability to call and message and chat and whatnot, the ability to take some photos and videos and share them with their friends, and a few other simple things like that. It's not about glamor and quad-core computation and touch screen crystal density. I always try to take this stance, but to be triple-sure, I let my generic progenitors roadtest the Ubuntu Phone and give their own verdict. A true, practical, down-to-earth judgment sans any touch Utopia nonsense.

Anyhow, the Ubuntu Phone isn't a bad product really. This is a good start. A very good start. However, the devil is in the fine details. And money is in the applications and the seamless integration among all aspects of online and media. So I'd focus there, to make sure that Ubuntu users can enjoy music and video and buy stuff without having to go through any hoops and loops that iOS or Android users need not to. That's how this little thing will guarantee its survival and eventual success. Because largely, the actual platform is irrelevant. But then, throw in Convergence, and Ubuntu has an awesome opportunity to be a truly all-spectrum operating system, ahead of all the rest. Even Microsoft. Fingers crossed. We're done here. Stay tuned for more fun.

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You Can Now Have All the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Live DVDs Into a Single ISO Image

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Ubuntu

Softpedia was just informed today, June 4, 2016, by Željko Popivoda from the Linux AIO team that the Linux AIO Ubuntu project has finally been updated to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS operating system.

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It Will Soon Be Possible to Deliver Many Popular Games as Snaps for Ubuntu 16.04

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Gaming
Ubuntu

Canonical's Zygmunt Krynicki and Michael Vogt announced the release of snapd 2.0.5, the fifth maintenance release in the stable 2.0 series of the Snappy daemon for Ubuntu Linux.

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Watch: Mycroft AI Running on Ubuntu GNOME 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) Linux OS

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GNOME
Ubuntu

Developer Aditya Mehra launched a couple of days ago an extension for the GNOME Shell user interface of the acclaimed GNOME desktop environment so that you can interact with Mycroft AI.

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Canonical Patches ImageTragick Exploit in All Supported Ubuntu OSes, Update Now

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Security
Ubuntu

Today, June 2, 2016, Canonical published an Ubuntu Security Notice to inform the community about an important security update to the ImageMagick packages for all supported Ubuntu OSes.

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Verdict and 10 things to know about Ubuntu bq Aquaris M10

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Mobile devices, especially smartphones, are becoming more powerful every year and are practically taking over our computing lives. Instead of bemoaning the death of the desktop, Ubuntu Touch takes the bull by the horns and creates a convergence of both worlds in a single device. It is a future that many other companies and tech pundits have pointed to. We're definitely not yet there, but the bq Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Touch is definitely a nice first step.

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Ubuntu Touch now supports Convergence over wireless display

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Ubuntu

Canonical has just released the latest major update to the Ubuntu Touch mobile OS and it is really a major one, especially for owners of Ubuntu Touch smartphones. While those, particularly the Meizu PRO 5 Ubuntu Edition, is more than capable of offering Convergence, it was blocked by the lack of a HDMI out port. With this latest OTA-11 update, that is no longer an issue as Ubuntu Touch now supports connecting to an external display wirelessly, which means smartphone users can even more conveniently use Convergence with no wires in sight.

As a quick recap, Convergence is a feature of Ubuntu Touch that truly lets your transform your smartphone or tablet into a portable desktop. Unlike Microsoft's Continuum, users aren't limited to only a specific subset of apps. As Ubuntu Touch can run both touch-friendly mobile apps as well as regular Linux desktop apps, that theoretically means everything.

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Ubuntu Snaps

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Ubuntu
  • Creating a Snap is Not Difficult, Here's How to Package Your Apps for Ubuntu

    Canonical's Jamie Bennett talks in his latest blog post about how hard is to package your applications for various GNU/Linux operating systems, as well as how easy it to distribute them on Ubuntu via a Snap package.

    Snap is a new secure, isolated technology designed by Canonical for its Snappy Ubuntu Core operating system, which relies on snapd, the snap-based runtime environment, and Snapcraft, the tool anyone can use to package their applications into a Snap for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and later.

  • QNAP to Use Ubuntu and Snaps for Distributing IoT Apps to Its NAS Solutions

    QNAP Systems, Inc., a Taiwanese corporation known for creating NAS solutions for storage management, file sharing, surveillance, and virtualization applications, announced recently that they are moving to offering IoT apps.

    It's a bold move, but even if we don't realize it yet IoT (Internet of Things) is the future, and like any other corporation out there that wants to survive today's economy and fast-changing technology landscape it keep up with the latest trends.

Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) Switches to a Universal Local DNS Resolver Service

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Ubuntu

As you might know by now, Ubuntu 16.10 is currently in heavy development these days, and it is getting all sorts of new GNU/Linux technologies and improvements.

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Ubuntu Phone and Ubuntu Tablet

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Ubuntu
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