Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ubuntu

Canonical/Ubuntu: Snapcraft Summit, Ubuntu Server, NTT TechnoCross

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Plex joins Snapcraft Summit to advance snap learnings

    Plex is the leading streaming platform for personal media collections, also offering over-the-air Live TV and DVR capabilities, and curated news from over 200 global media partners. It’s the only solution that seamlessly combines your personal collection of TV shows, movies, music, photos, and videos alongside live and recorded TV. With a highly-customisable and easy-to-use interface, Plex is a top 10 most-watched app with 4+ star ratings on all major OTT platforms. Plex’s mission is to give users the very best OTT media experience.

  • Ubuntu Server Development Summary – 30 Jan 2018
  • NTT TechnoCross becomes Canonical Certified Support Partner in Japan

    NTT TechnoCross Corporation has signed a partnership agreement with Canonical to provide strengthened OSS support to its customers in Japan including OpenStack deployments.

    NTT TechnoCross will provide Japanese support for domestic customers and will be the first contact for customer enquiries and fault isolation and resolution phase.

    NTT TechnoCross has extensive experience with OSS including OpenStack and provides a wide range of support options to customers from OS to middleware.

    Working with Canonical, NTT TechnoCross will increase its presence in cloud platform with a combination of technical support on OSS and OpenStack and expand its presence in IoT/Edge Computing.

Canonical/Ubuntu/System76

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • LXD Weekly Status #32
  • Ubuntu reverting to Xorg in Bionic Beaver

    Ten years' worth of effort to replace the Xorg graphics framework has been given a “must try harder” mark by Ubuntu, which says its next release will not use Wayland by default.

    Ubuntu's desktop engineering manager Will Cooke made the announcement last Friday, saying the decision applies to the Bionic Beaver release due in April.

    He listed three shortcomings in Wayland: screen sharing works (for example in Skype, Hangouts and WebRTC) better in Xorg, remote desktop control ditto, and “recoverability from Shell crashes is less dramatic”.

  • System76 Wants to Offer Full Disk Encryption for Its Ubuntu-Based Pop!_OS Linux

    System76, the computer reseller specialized in the sale of Linux-based notebook, desktop, and server computers, shared details on new installer work for the next release of Pop!_OS Linux.

    It would appear that System76 is collaborating with elementary's Daniel Foré on a new installer, which will offer full disk encryption support, for the next major release of their Ubuntu-Based Pop!_OS Linux distribution, which is coming this spring based on Canonical's Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system.

Ubuntu and Derivatives: Ubuntu 18.04, elementary OS, Pop!_OS

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 18.04 will revert to long-in-the-tooth Xorg

    Canonical has announced that it’ll be reverting back to the Xorg graphics stack as the default option in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS “Bionic Beaver”. While Wayland will still be available as an option, the testing that Canonical carried out by making Wayland default in Ubuntu 17.10 has found that Xorg is still more advantageous to use over Wayland, especially for a release which needs to be rock solid as it gets picked up by educational institutions and businesses.

  • How to put icons on the desktop in elementary OS

    Ever tried elementary OS? If so you’ll know that you can’t put icons on the desktop by default.

    It’s a frustrating experience, particularly if you’re used to being able to use the desktop space as a literal ‘desktop space’. Sadly, elementary (sic) says it has ‘no plans’ to rethink its approach.

    But there is good news. An app called Desktop Folder lets you enable a desktop on elementary (of sorts) so that you can layer icons, files and app shortcuts all over your desktop wallpaper.

  • System76 Eyeing Disk Encryption By Default

    Ubuntu-focused Linux PC vendor System76 who has also been working on their own Pop!_OS distribution is looking at enabling disk encryption by default.

    System76 has shared another blog post highlighting their work on Pop!_OS. The latest is on their design work and installer. But what got me excited about this post is the mention of "Full disk encryption is seen as an important part of security and privacy and should be a default option...A hurdle for a privacy and security focused OEM like System76 is how to deliver a computer with the encryption provided by default."

  • Installer, elementary and Pop!_OS collaboration

    Welcome back, Pop! Fans - time for an update on the week! We have some great stuff going on.

    This week has been primarily been dominated by installer work. Daniel Foré from elementary flew in to work with us on what the new installer is going to be like. Last week, we shared quite a bit of the styling around Pop!_Shop and the installer with the visual designs. The work with elementary was focused on user experience around installation, drive partitioning, dual booting, and full disk encryption.

    At the kick off, we discussed what the various screens should look like and how they should be organized., as well as full disk encryption. Full disk encryption is seen as an important part of security and privacy and should be a default option. We worked around the challenges of incorporating full disk in the UI and what it means for the backend and identifying the various scenarios that exist. A hurdle for a privacy and security focused OEM like System76 is how to deliver a computer with the encryption provided by default. Pre-encrypting would require a unique key for that user that can’t be guaranteed. If a user wanted to have encryption they would have to encrypt and re-install the whole OS which is also not ideal.

Ubuntu and Linux Mint Monthly News

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • ucaresystem core 4.4.0 : Pkexec, check for reboot and minor fix

    The new release 4.4.0 of ucaresystem core introduces two internal but important features and a minor bug fix for Debian Jessie. Let’s check them out…Thanks to an idea of Mark Drone on launchpad, I added in ucaresystem core the feature to recognize and inform the user in case they need to restart the system after installing upgrades that require it.

  • 16.04.4 point release delayed; new date TBD

    Due to the ongoing evolution of the fixes for the recently announced
    Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities [1], we are delaying the
    16.04.4 point release, originally scheduled for the week of February
    15. We intend that, when it is released, 16.04.4 will include kernels
    which mitigate these severe vulnerabilities. We also recognize that,
    because updates for these security vulnerabilities are currently
    monopolizing the SRU queue for kernels, there is no opportunity for
    any other point-release-critical fixes to be included, and we need to
    allow the dust to settle a bit before putting the finishing touches on
    the point release.

  • Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS Delayed Due to Meltdown and Spectre Security Vulnerabilities

    Canonical announced today that it decided to delay the upcoming 16.04.4 point release of the long-term supported Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system due to the Spectre and Meltdown security vulnerabilities.

    Originally scheduled for release next month on February 15, 2018, Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS is the fourth of five scheduled maintenance updates for Xenial Xerus, and it was supposed to ship with up-to-date kernel and graphics stacks based on those from the last stable release, Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark).

  • Linux Mint Monthly News – January 2018

    Things are very exciting for us at the moment. This is the start of a new year, we’re working on two new bases (Ubuntu 18.04 for Linux Mint 19 and Debian 9 for LMDE 3) and rather than diving straight into the development cycle, and working on fixing bugs and developing new features, we’ve taken some time off to improve our infrastructure, our documentation and the way we work.

    Before we dive into that, we’d like to thank all the people who donated to us: Neil V. in particular for donating $4,000, and the 653 other people who donated to us this December. We’ve never received as much in a single month, we’ve never received as much from a single donation, and we’ve never received donations from as many people in a single month before. So we’re extremely humbled, and extremely proud of us, and of you, and happy to see your enjoyment and your response to what we do. This is really amazing.

Canonical Releases New Linux Kernel Update for Ubuntu 17.10 and 16.04 HWE Users

Filed under
Ubuntu

Coming a few days after the last kernel update released earlier this week, which included mitigations for the Spectre security vulnerability that puts billions of devices at risk of attacks, today's security update addresses a logic error in Linux kernel's x86-64 syscall entry implementation, discovered by Jay Vosburgh.

According to the security advisory published today by Canonica, it would appear that the security issue has been introduced by the mitigations for the Spectre hardware bug, and it could allow a local attacker to either execute arbitrary code or cause a denial of service (DoS attack).

Read more

Bionic Beaver 18.04 LTS to use Xorg by default

Filed under
Ubuntu

Bionic Beaver, the codename for the next Ubuntu LTS release, is due in April 2018 and will ship with both the traditional Xorg graphics stack as well as the newer Wayland based stack, but Xorg will be the default.

17.10, released in October 2017, ships with the Wayland based graphics server as the default and the Xorg based equivalent is available as an option from the login screen. When we started out on the GNOME Shell route for 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) we knew that we needed to have Wayland as the default option otherwise we wouldn’t know if it would work well for our users in the LTS only 6 months later. The LTS is supported for five years meaning that we need to be certain that what goes out the door on release day will be maintainable and sustainable for the duration and will serve all our users and customers needs, which is no mean feat.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) Will Ship with XOrg by Default, Says Canonical

Ubuntu Linux 18.04 'Bionic Beaver' LTS will default to Xorg

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Will Default To The X.Org Stack, Not Wayland

Canonical/Ubuntu: Ubuntu Development Summary, LXD, and Kernel Patches for Intel's Sabotage

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Development Summary – 23 Jan 2018

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list.

  • LXD Weekly Status #31

    Nothing too major happened this past week. Part of the time was at an internal planning meeting and the rest have been working on clustering, preparation for 3.0 and fixing a variety of bugs.

  • Kernel Team Summary: January 24, 2018

    The Kernel Team is completely focused on addressing any Spectre and Meltdown issues as they arise. A secure Ubuntu is our top priority. No new Livepatches are being produced and our regular SRU cycles are suspended while we address Spectre and Meltdown.

  • Meltdown, Spectre and Ubuntu: What you need to know

    As details of the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities1 have become clearer a number of statements have been published by the multiple vendors affected; Canonical has issued advisories and updates on fixes and mitigations, the latest of which mitigate known Spectre attacks. However, most of these statements focus on the mechanics of applying fixes and corresponding damage control, and not on explaining what the problems are, how the mitigations work, and how they may affect you.

Canonical Releases Spectre Patches for Ubuntu Linux, Meltdown Fix for PowerPC

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

Canonical published today a new set of kernel updates for all of its supported Ubuntu Linux releases that include patches for the Spectre and Meltdown security vulnerabilities.

After pulling Intel's microcode firmware update from the software repositories of Ubuntu 17.10, 16.04 LTS, and 14.04 LTS, Canonical now released the Spectre patches for all supported Ubuntu Linux releases, including all official flavors and those using HWE (Hardware Enablement) kernels, and Meltdown kernel patches for PowerPC (PPC64el) architectures.

Read more

Also: Canonical announces Ubuntu product month for February

Welcome To The (Ubuntu) Bionic Age: Nautilus, a LTS and desktop icons

Filed under
Ubuntu

If you are following closely the news of various tech websites, one of the latest hot topic in the community was about Nautilus removing desktop icons. Let’s try to clarify some points to ensure the various discussions around it have enough background information and not reacting on emotions only as it could be seen lately. You will have both downstream (mine) and upstream (Carlos) perspectives here.

Read more

Canonical Says Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) Will Come with Boot Speed Boost

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical's Will Cooke published a new Ubuntu Desktop newsletter today to inform the community on the development progress of the upcoming Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system.

Besides various improvements for the GNOME desktop environment, the Ubuntu Desktop team over at Canonical recently started to investigate the boot speed of the Ubuntu Linux operating system, planning to give it another boost by using systemd’s latest features to do some profiling, which will help them identify any issues that might cause slow boot up time.

Read more

Also: Canonical Pulls Intel's Spectre Update from Ubuntu Repos Due to Hardware Issues

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Canonical Releases Kernel Security Updates for Ubuntu 17.10 and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

For Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) users, today's security update addresses a bug (CVE-2018-8043) in Linux kernel's Broadcom UniMAC MDIO bus controller driver, which improperly validated device resources, allowing a local attacker to crash the vulnerable system by causing a denial of service (DoS attack). For Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) users, the security patch fixes a buffer overread vulnerability (CVE-2017-13305) in Linux kernel's keyring subsystem and an information disclosure vulnerability (CVE-2018-5750) in the SMBus driver for ACPI Embedded Controllers. Both issues could allow a local attacker to expose sensitive information. Read more

Security: Updates, Reproducible Builds, Match.com and More

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #156
  • A Match.com glitch reactivated a bunch of old profiles, raising concerns about user data

    A Match Group spokesperson confirmed that a “limited number” of old accounts had been accidentally reactivated recently and that any account affected received a password reset. Match.com’s current privacy statement, which was last updated in 2016, says that the company can “retain certain information associated with your account” even after you close it. But that Match Group spokesperson also told The Verge that the company plans to roll out a new privacy policy “in the next month or so,” in order to comply with the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR); under the new policy, all those years-old accounts will be deleted. The Verge has requested clarification on which accounts will qualify for deletion, and what “deletion” will specifically entail, but has not received a response as of press time.

  • New hacks siphon private cryptocurrency keys from airgapped wallets

    Like most of the other attacks developed by Ben-Gurion University professor Mordechai Guri and his colleagues, the currency wallet exploits start with the already significant assumption that a device has already been thoroughly compromised by malware. Still, the research is significant because it shows that even when devices are airgapped—meaning they aren't connected to any other devices to prevent the leaking of highly sensitive data—attackers may still successfully exfiltrate the information. Past papers have defeated airgaps using a wide array of techniques, including electromagnetic emissions from USB devices, radio signals from a computer's video card, infrared capabilities in surveillance cameras, and sounds produced by hard drives.

  • New hacker group targets US health-care industry, researchers say

    The group, which Symantec has named “Orangeworm,” has been installing backdoors in large international corporations based in the U.S., Europe and Asia that operate in the health-care sector.

    Among its victims are health-care providers and pharmaceutical companies, as well as IT companies and equipment manufacturers that work for health organizations.

today's howtos

Graphics: VC4 and AMDVLK Driver

  • VC4 display, VC5 kernel submitted
    For VC5, I renamed the kernel driver to “v3d” and submitted it to the kernel. Daniel Vetter came back right away with a bunch of useful feedback, and next week I’m resolving that feedback and continuing to work on the GMP support. On the vc4 front, I did the investigation of the HDL to determine that the OLED matrix applies before the gamma tables, so we can expose it in the DRM for Android’s color correction. Stefan was also interested in reworking his fencing patches to use syncobjs, so hopefully we can merge those and get DRM HWC support in mainline soon. I also pushed Gustavo’s patch for using the new core DRM infrastructure for async cursor updates. This doesn’t simplify our code much yet, but Boris has a series he’s working on that gets rid of a lot of custom vc4 display code by switching more code over to the new async support.
  • V3D DRM Driver Revised As It Works To Get Into The Mainline Kernel
    Eric Anholt of Broadcom has sent out his revised patches for the "V3D" DRM driver, which up until last week was known as the VC5 DRM driver. As explained last week, the VC5 driver components are being renamed to V3D since it ends up supporting more than just VC5 with Broadcom VC6 hardware already being supported too. Eric is making preparations to get this VideoCore driver into the mainline Linux kernel and he will then also rename the VC5 Gallium3D driver to V3D Gallium3D.
  • AMDVLK Driver Gets Fixed For Rise of the Tomb Raider Using Application Profiles
    With last week's release of Rise of the Tomb Raider on Linux ported by Feral Interactive, when it came to Radeon GPU support for this Vulkan-only Linux game port the Mesa RADV driver was supported while the official AMDVLK driver would lead to GPU hangs. That's now been fixed. With the latest AMDVLK/XGL source code as of today, the GPU hang issue for Rise of the Tomb Raider should now be resolved.