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Ubuntu

Linux Mint and Mir 1.0

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Refreshed stable Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE) 2 'Betsy' ISO images now available
  • Mir and Zesty

    Mir is continuing to make progress towards a 1.0 release and, meanwhile, Zesty Zapus (Ubuntu 17.04) is continuing to make progress towards final freeze.

  • Mir 1.0 Expected To Come Early In Ubuntu 17.10 Cycle

    Canonical developer Alan Griffiths has shared a few details about getting Mir 1.0 ready for release.

    Long story short, they are expecting to officially release Mir 1.0 with an ABI guarantee early in the Ubuntu 17.10 development cycle. It's yet to be firmly decided whether there will be one major release before going to v1.0 (it would be v0.27), but it's looking like not too far after Ubuntu 17.04 is released next month, we could see Mir 1.0 declared.

Ubuntu-Based Black Lab Linux Gets New Weekly Build with Linux 4.8, Unity Desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu

Another week, another weekly build of the Ubuntu-based Black Lab Linux operating system is available for download, as Black Lab Software Robert J. Dohnert informed Softpedia.

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Canonical announces Ubuntu Linux 12.04 ESM (Extended Security Maintenance)

Filed under
Ubuntu

On April 25th, Ubuntu Linux 12.04 LTS will no longer be supported by Canonical. Why? That is the 5 year anniversary of the release, which is the amount of support time given to an LTS (Long Term Support) version of the Linux distribution.

For many home users, this really doesn't matter, as they have probably already upgraded to a newer version. Unfortunately, some businesses do not upgrade as regularly. In fact, some organizations may not be ready to move on from Ubuntu 12.04. Tough luck? Not at all. Today, Canonical introduces Ubuntu Linux 12.04 ESM. This "Extended Security Maintenance" release is not free, however -- organizations must pay for the extended support.

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Tiny, open spec quad -A53 SBC sells for $15

Filed under
Ubuntu

FriendlyElec’s 40 x 40mm, Ubuntu Core ready “NanoPi Neo2” updates the Neo with a 64-bit Allwinner H5 and a GbE port.

FriendlyElec (FriendlyARM) has added to its line of tiny, open spec NanoPi Neo SBCs with a Neo2 model that advances to an ARMv8 architecture. Whereas the similarly 40 x 40mm NanoPi Neo and wireless-enabled NanoPi Neo Air run Ubuntu Core on a quad-core, Cortex-A7 Allwinner H3 clocked to 1.2GHz, the NanoPi Neo2 moves up to a quad-core, Cortex-A53 Allwinner H5. The A5, which is also found on the Orange Pi PC 2 hacker SBC, is joined by a higher-end Mali-450 GPU. No clock rate is specified.

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Robotics savvy BeagleBone Blue SBC turns on the servos

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu

BeagleBoard.org’s $80 “BeagleBone Blue” robotics SBC runs Debian on an Octavo SiP, and adds motion control and battery friendly power to the BB Black.

BeagleBoard.org first showed off a prototype of its robotics-targeted, community backed BeagleBone Blue back in Jan. 2016. The BeagleBone Black spin-off was designed and developed in coordination with the UCSD Coordinated Robotics Lab, and has been tested by hundreds of students. BeagleBoard.org has now launched the open-spec, Linux-driven SBC with Arrow, Element14, and Mouser offering prices ranging from $80 to $82.

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MATE 1.18 Desktop Environment Released, Focuses on Completing the GTK3 Migration

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu MATE leader and MATE developer Martin Wimpress is proud to announce today, March 14, 2017, the general and immediate availability of the MATE 1.18 desktop environment.

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Orion Ubuntu Laptop Review: The Powerful MacBook Pro Alternative

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

The choice of a new laptop for many consumers is still seen as the head-to-head comparison of Microsoft’s Windows 10 or Apple’s macOS. The third option of moving to a Linux-powered machine has always been a much trickier prospect. A dizzying range of Linux "flavors" coupled with the mysteries of hardware support stops many adept users from making the switch. What if you had an off-the-shelf approach to Linux hardware that just worked?

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Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

It Looks Like Ubuntu 17.04 Might Ship with Mesa 17.0.1 and X.Org Server 1.19.2

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

How Ubuntu is helping to optimize Google Cloud

Filed under
Google
Software
Interviews
Ubuntu

While the products that Ubuntu provides — such as Canonical Livepatch Service and Juju — are well-known in the cloud community, its corporate stance is not as recognized. It’s hoping to change that perception.

“Ubuntu is a very popular [operating system], and we are most dominant in public cloud,” explained Udi Nachmany, vice president of public cloud at Ubuntu.

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OSS Leftovers

  • Nextcloud 12 Officially Released, Adds New Architecture for Massive Scalability
    Nextcloud informs Softpedia today about the official availability of the final release of Nextcloud 12, a major milestone of the self-hosting cloud server technology that introduces numerous new features and improvements. The biggest new feature of the Nextcloud 12 release appears to be the introduction of a new architecture for massive scalability, called Global Scale, which is a next-generation open-source technology for syncing and sharing files. Global Scale increases scalability from tens of thousands of users to hundreds of millions on a single instance, while helping universities and other institutions significantly reduce the costs of their existing large installations.
  • ReactOS 0.4.5 Open-Source Windows-Compatible OS Launches with Many Improvements
    ReactOS 0.4.5 is a maintenance update that adds numerous changes and improvements over the previous point release. The kernel has been updated in this version to improve the FreeLoader and UEFI booting, as well as the Plug and Play modules, adding support for more computers to boot ReactOS without issues.
  • Sprint Debuts Open Source NFV/SDN Platform Developed with Intel Labs
    AT&T has been the headliner in the carrier race to software defined networking (SDN) and network function virtualization (NFV). But Sprint is putting its own stamp on the space this week with its debut of a new open source SDN/NFV mobile core solution.
  • Google’s New Home for All Things Open Source Runs Deep
    Google is not only one of the biggest contributors to the open source community but also has a strong track record of delivering open source tools and platforms that give birth to robust technology ecosystems. Just witness the momentum that Android and Kubernetes now have. Recently, Google launched a new home for its open source projects, processes, and initiatives. The site runs deep and has several avenues worth investigating. Here is a tour and some highlights worth noting.
  • Making your first open source contribution
  • Simplify expense reports with Smart Receipts
    The app is called Smart Receipts, it's licensed AGPL 3.0, and the source code is available on GitHub for Android and iOS.
  • How the TensorFlow team handles open source support
    Open-sourcing is more than throwing code over the wall and hoping somebody uses it. I knew this in theory, but being part of the TensorFlow team at Google has opened my eyes to how many different elements you need to build a community around a piece of software.
  • IRC for the 21st Century: Introducing Riot
    Internet relay chat (IRC) is one of the oldest chat protocols around and still popular in many open source communities. IRC's best strengths are as a decentralized and open communication method, making it easy for anyone to participate by running a network of their own. There are also a variety of clients and bots available for IRC.