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Ubuntu

Ubuntu GNOME 15.04 Alpha 2 Is Out and Based on GNOME 3.14 – Screenshot Tour

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

The second Alpha version for the 15.04 branch of Ubuntu GNOME has been released and is now ready for testing. It's not a major evolution from the previous Alpha, but some of the important packages have been upgraded.

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Intel spins Ubuntu based education access point

Filed under
Ubuntu

Intel announced a portable access point and content server for schools that runs Ubuntu on an Atom E3815, and serves up to 50 students using WiFi or GbE.

For years, Intel has offered low-cost computers for schools in emerging nations, primarily via its Linux-ready Classmate netbooks, and more recently, its Android-powered Intel Education Tablets. Now it’s getting into the content server side of the equation with its Ubuntu Linux-based Education Content Access Point. The batery-powered device can serve content to up to 50 students using any web browser device via WiFi, Ethernet, or optional cellular connections.

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Vivid Vervet Alpha 2 Released

Filed under
Ubuntu

The second alpha of the Vivid Vervet (to become 15.04) has now been released!

Pre-releases of the Vivid Vervet are *not* encouraged for anyone
needing a stable system or anyone who is not comfortable running into
occasional, even frequent breakage. They are, however, recommended for
Ubuntu flavor developers and those who want to help in testing,
reporting and fixing bugs as we work towards getting this release
ready.

Alpha 2 includes a number of software updates that are ready for wider
testing. This is quite an early set of images, so you should expect
some bugs.

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You Can Now Run Ubuntu from a Mouse

Filed under
Ubuntu

The modern PCs have become ridiculously small and more powerful with each passing year. Up until now no one thought that it could be possible to fit everything into a mouse, but that's now becoming a reality and it's powerful enough that it can run even an OS like Ubuntu.

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What the heck are Ubuntu Unity's Scopes?

Filed under
Ubuntu

One of the elements of Ubuntu Unity that I have been able to handle the least is Scopes. Part of that is due to the fact that Canonical has done a pretty terrible job of properly showing people what Scopes are and what they do. The other part is… no… actually, that's really the whole problem. Here is how Ubuntu defines this feature:

"Scopes are a complete reinvention of the content and services experience. Users have a new way to access content and apps without having to download individual apps – and developers have the opportunity to be discovered via the device's categorized home screens."

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Thunderbird 31.4.0 Lands in Ubuntu Repos

Filed under
GNU
Moz/FF
Ubuntu

Canonical published details about a number of Thunderbird vulnerabilities in its Ubuntu 14.10, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS operating systems, which means that a new version is now available.

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Microsoft Is Trying and Failing at Converging Platforms, Ubuntu Does It Right

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Windows fans are worried that the desktop PC will follow too closely the design of Windows 10 for phones and tablets, and they are right to do so. This all plays out due to Microsoft’s plans for convergence, but it's a twisted approach that only makes things more complicated than they should be.

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Canonical Launches IoT Version Of Ubuntu Core

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Ubuntu

Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu Linux distribution, wants to bring its operating system to more connected devices and intelligent objects with the launch of its “snappy” Ubuntu Core for the Internet of Things today. Over the last few months, the company launched “snappy” versions of Core on a number of cloud computing services, but given that the whole idea behind Core is to offer stripped-down versions of Ubuntu that developers can then easily customize based on their needs, the Internet of Things and robotics applications are a logical next area of focus for Canonical.

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Lightweight “Snappy Ubuntu Core” OS targets IoT

Filed under
OS
Ubuntu

Canonical released a “Snappy” version of its lightweight, Ubuntu Core OS for IoT, featuring an app store, hacker-proof updates, and a 128MB RAM footprint.

Canonical’s delayed Ubuntu Touch phones are apparently still on track for Mobile World Congress release next month, but now the company is on to something based on it that’s potentially much bigger.

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Ubuntu Linux is now ready to power your appliances and robots

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu
Gadgets

Ubuntu Linux has spread to quite a few platforms in its 10-year history, if not always successfully. Today, though, the open source software is tackling what could be its greatest challenge yet: the internet of things. Canonical has released a version of its stripped-down snappy Ubuntu Core for connected devices like home appliances, robots and anything else where a conventional PC operating system wouldn't fly. It's designed to run on modest hardware (a 600MHz processor will do) and provide easy updates, all the while giving gadget makers the freedom to customize the software for whatever they're building. It promises to be extra-reliable, too -- it only applies updates if the code checks out, so you won't lose control of your smart thermostat due to a buggy upgrade.

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Gorgeous Live Voyager X Distro Brings Xfce 4.12 to Ubuntu 14.04 LTS - Video and Screenshot Tour

On March 27, 2015, French developer Rodolphe Bachelart, the creator of the Live Voyager series of GNU/Linux distributions based on Ubuntu/Xubuntu, was proud to announce the immediate availability for download of a new computer operating system, Live Voyager X 14.04.4 LTS. Read more

Head 2 Head: Android OS vs. Chrome OS

A large part of Google’s OS success hasn’t been because of its awesomeness. No. Frankly, we think nothing speaks louder than the almighty dollar in this world. But both are “free,” right? So this is tie? Not really. Although Android is technically free since Google doesn’t charge device makers for it, there are costs associated with getting devices “certified.” Oh, yeah, and then there’s Apple and Microsoft, both of which get healthy payouts from device makers through patent lawsuits. Microsoft reportedly makes far more from Android sales than Windows Phone sales. You just generally don’t see the price because it’s abstracted by carriers. Chrome OS, on the other hand, actually is pretty much free. A top-ofthe-line Chromebook is $280, while a top-of-the-line Android phone full retail is usually $600. We’re giving this one to Chrome OS because if it’s generally cheaper for the builder, it’s cheaper for you. Read more

Kodi (XBMC Media Center) 14.2 Officially Released, Kodi 15 “Isengard” Is On Its Way

The Kodi development team, through Nathan Betzen, had the pleasure of announcing today, March 28, the immediate availability for download of the second and last maintenance release for Kodi 14 (codename Helix), before they continue with the development cycle for the upcoming release, Kodi 15, dubbed Isengard. Read more

Debian 8 Jessie Installer Now Supports Running a 64-bit Linux Kernel on a 32-bit EFI

The Debian Installer team had the pleasure of announcing on March 27 that the second Release Candidate (RC) version of the Debian 8.0 "Jessie" installer is now available for download and testing. The RC2 version of the installer brings a great number of improvements and fixes. Read more