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Ubuntu

Egmde in Ubuntu and Making It Look Like Vista 10

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Ubuntu
  • Egmde: keymap and wallpaper

    I recently (re)introduced a simple shell based on Mir: egmde. This shell is just the code needed to illustrate these articles and, maybe, inspire others to build on it but it is not intended to be a product.

    At the end of the last article we could run egmde as a desktop and run and use Wayland based applications.
    Those of us in Europe (or elsewhere outside the USA) will soon notice that the keyboard layout has defaulted to US, so I’ll show how to fix that. And the black background is rather depressing, so I’ll show how to implement a simple wallpaper; and, finally, how to allow the user to customize the wallpaper.

  • Hacking With Mir's EGMDE Desktop To Support Different Keymaps, Custom Wallpapers

    At the end of March longtime Mir developer Alan Griffiths of Canonical announced EGMDE, the Mir Desktop Environment as a desktop example implementing Mir/MirAL APIs and supporting Wayland clients. Griffiths has now put out his latest article in guiding interested developers in working with the code.

  • Want to make Ubuntu look like Windows 10?

    As a man with a keen eye for aesthetic details, I do like the concept of trying to make operating systems mimic their rivals, provided this can be done with elegance, style, quality and attention to detail. A great example would be the Macbuntu transformation pack. Including but not limited to.

    Now, Windows 10. Say what you will about it, it ain't ugly. It's actually a reasonably pretty distro, although the whole flatness deal is a bit overplayed. But since Linux can be made to look like anything, I set about testing, in Ubuntu, Kubuntu and even Linux Mint, to see whether this is something worth your time and decorative skills in the first place. Will this work? An open question. After me.

Ubuntu Spotted in ‘Maze Runner: The Death Cure’

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Ubuntu

If you plan on renting a copy of Maze Runner: The Death Cure when it hits home media later this month, you may spot something familiar that’ll have you spitting your popcorn out.

An eagle-eyed Reddit user spotted Ubuntu, complete with the Unity desktop, being used in the latest instalment of the Maze Runner film franchise.

I have not seen any of the Maze Runner films (or read the books, but I can’t imagine Ubuntu is specified in them) so I’ve zero idea about the context for Ubuntu’s appearance in ‘Maze Runner: The Death Cure‘.

But based on the well-worn Hollywood tropes we can see in this screenshot, i.e the green-tinged screen and various command line prompts, I’m guessing some sort of “hacking” is taking place.

Admittedly we’re not talking high-level, elite hack0rz here though as if you look at the output of GNOME terminal closely you’ll see the user has just run sudo apt upgrade.

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The Lightweight Xubuntu 18.04 Beta 2

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Ubuntu

Xubuntu 18.04 beta 2 is already lightweight yet still feature-rich. It gives us same experience with the old Xubuntu but with latest version of applications. And please note, it still support both 64 bit and 32 bit! We can consider the next final stable release to be as lightweight as this beta 2 version. Finally, Xubuntu Bionic is really amusing. We will wait!

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Ubuntu Linux 18.04 LTS Bionic Beaver and Pop!_OS 18.04 Previews

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Linux 18.04 LTS Bionic Beaver: What’s new?

    Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will be released on April 26. It is Canonical’s seventh Long Term Support release, and it comes with several changes for the Ubuntu community. These include a slightly, darkish theme and X.Org Server as default display server instead of Wayland, which is used in the current stable release, Ubuntu 17.10, Artful Aardvark. Ubuntu 18.04 is still in beta and is not recommended for use on production systems or on your primary computers just yet.

  • Pop!_Testing

    It is through your feedback and contributions that Pop!_OS can become the productivity platform for innovators, developers, makers, and computer scientists.

  • System76 Rolls Out Pop!_OS 18.04 For Testing

    Linux PC vendor System76 has released their second test spin of the upcoming Pop!_OS 18.04, which is also derived from Ubuntu 18.04 LTS but with a growing set of changes.

Ubuntu: 10 Years Since Ubuntu 8.04 LTS and Plans for Ubuntu Desktop

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Ubuntu
  • On the road to lean infrastructure

    On April 24 2008, Ubuntu 8.04 LTS Hardy Heron was released. That was a decade ago, when the modern cloud computing era was dawning: Amazon’s EC2 was still in beta, Google had just released the Google App Engine and the word “container” was dominating the plastics industry rather than IT. A lot has changed since then, but it’s not uncommon to come across organizations with machines still running Hardy or other equally dated distributions.

    The Gordian Knot of traditional, pre-DevOps IT infrastructure encompasses meticulously crafted, opportunistically documented and precariously automated “snowflake” environments. Managing such systems induces a slow pace of change, and yet in many cases rip and replace is not a justifiable investment. Invariably though, unabated progress dictates the reconciliation of today’s best practices with the legacy artifacts of the past. Lift and shift can be an efficient, reliable and automated approach to this conundrum.

  • Ubuntu Desktop weekly update – 13 April 2018

    Wow, only two weeks to go until the Beaver is born, this cycle seems have flown by.  So what’s been going on in the last couple of weeks, and what can we expect to change in the run up to release day?

    We’re still working on adding a new first-login experience to guide people through configuring LivePatch and making decisions about sharing system information.  That work has landed in the archive and been reviewed for inclusion but we have to finalise the designs and get the last couple of bugs out. In the meantime you can configure LivePatch through the “Software & Updates” tool in the “Updates” tab.  

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Compact aircraft computer takes flight with Ubuntu

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Hardware
Ubuntu

Kontron’s “ACE Flight 1600 Gateway Router” avionics computer runs Linux on a Bay Trail Atom, and provides a 5-port, L2-managed GbE switch, 4G LTE Advanced-Pro, 802.11ac, and DO-160G compliance.

Kontron’s has added to its ACE Flight product line with a compact low-end router computer designed for small commercial jets and business jets. The fanless ACE Flight 1600 Gateway Router is a small form factor avionics networking platform that consolidates wireless connectivity, switching, routing, and security features. “A typical routing application is the secure interface from client devices onboard the aircraft to SATCOM or Air-To-Ground connectivity links,” says Kontron.

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Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Integrates Canonical Livepatch for Rebootless Kernel Updates

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Ubuntu

Canonical Livepatch is a free and commercial solution for applying Linux kernel updates without rebooting your Ubuntu computer. Initially designed for the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series, Canonical's kernel livepatch service is coming in an easier-to-use form in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, due for release on April 26.

The Software & Updates utility found in the default Ubuntu installation now integrates the Canonical Livepatch service in the Updates tab, but, to use it, you'll have to create an Ubuntu SSO (Single Sign-On) account and login with it by clicking on the "Sign In" button (see the screenshot gallery below for details).

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Open spec router SBC has M.2 and a pair each of SATA, GbE, and HDMI

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Android
Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

SinoVoip has launched a $93 “Banana Pi BPI-W2” multimedia router and NAS board that runs Android or Linux on a quad -A53 Realtek RTD129, and offers 2x GbE, 2x SATA 3.0, 3x M.2, HDMI in and out, and a 40-pin RPi connector.

After starting off its Spring collection earlier this week with a pair of ESP32 based Banana Pi boards, SinoVoip has returned to the Linux/Android world to release a Banana Pi BPI-W2 “multimedia network” and “smart NAS” router SBC. Available for $93 on AliExpress, the BPI-W2 has a faster processor and more advanced features than last year’s similarly sized (148 x 100.5mm) Banana Pi BPI-R2, which is available for $89.50 on AliExpress. However, the new model has only two Gigabit Ethernet ports instead of four.

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Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Will Let Users Choose Between Normal and Minimal Installations

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Ubuntu

Canonical's upcoming Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system is coming with numerous new changes, besides updated components and various other improvements.

In February, we took a look at the new Minimal Installation feature that would allow users to install a version of the operating system that includes only a few pre-installed apps, but it appears that Canonical recently changed the graphical installer to add another option for users.

Earlier development versions of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS only showed a "Minimal Installation" option on the "Preparing to Install Ubuntu" screen of the graphical installer, noting the fact that "This will install a minimal desktop environment with a browser and utilities."

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Also: Ubuntu available on IBM LinuxOne Rockhopper II

Ubuntu Is Now Available on the IBM LinuxONE Rockhopper II and IBM z14 Model ZR1

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Ubuntu

It appears that Canonical worked closely with IBM to ensure Ubuntu works out-of-the-box on IBM's recently announced IBM z14 Model ZR1 and IBM LinuxONE Rockhopper II servers, along with the company's LXD next-generation system container manager, OpenStack open-source software platform for cloud computing, Juju application and service modelling tool, and Canonical’s Distribution of Kubernetes.

These will provide companies and developers with all the tools they need to get the job done, building and deploying apps on their infrastructures at a large scale within a single system. For hybrid-cloud environments, IBM's new systems also come with a Docker-certified infrastructure for Docker Enterprise Edition (EE), which integrates management and scale tested on up to 330,000 Docker containers.

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More in Tux Machines

It Turns Out RISC-V Hardware So Far Isn't Entirely Open-Source

While they are trying to make it an open board, as it stands now Minnich just compares this RISC-V board as being no more open than an average ARM SoC and not as open as IBM POWER. Ron further commented that he is hoping for other RISC-V implementations from different vendors be more open. Read more

Perl 5.28.0 released

Version 5.28.0 of the Perl language has been released. "Perl 5.28.0 represents approximately 13 months of development since Perl 5.26.0 and contains approximately 730,000 lines of changes across 2,200 files from 77 authors". The full list of changes can be found over here; some highlights include Unicode 10.0 support, string- and number-specific bitwise operators, a change to more secure hash functions, and safer in-place editing. Read more

Today in Techrights

Will Microsoft’s Embrace Smother GitHub?

Microsoft has had an adversarial relationship with the open-source community. The company viewed the free Open Office software and the Linux operating system—which compete with Microsoft Office and Windows, respectively—as grave threats. In 2001 Windows chief Jim Allchin said: “Open source is an intellectual-property destroyer.” That same year CEO Steve Ballmer said “Linux is a cancer.” Microsoft attempted to use copyright law to crush open source in the courts. When these tactics failed, Microsoft decided if you can’t beat them, join them. It incorporated Linux and other open-source code into its servers in 2014. By 2016 Microsoft had more programmers contributing code to GitHub than any other company. The GitHub merger might reflect Microsoft’s “embrace, extend and extinguish” strategy for dominating its competitors. After all, GitHub hosts not only open-source software and Microsoft software but also the open-source projects of other companies, including Oracle, IBM, and Amazon Web Services. With GitHub, Microsoft could restrict a crucial platform for its rivals, mine data about competitors’ activities, target ads toward users, or restrict free services. Its control could lead to a sort of surveillance of innovative activity, giving it a unique, macro-scaled insight into software development. Read more