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Ubuntu

Make Ubuntu and Debian Look Windows 8 with a Single Click

Filed under
Microsoft
Debian
Ubuntu

There is no love between Linux and Windows users, but that doesn't stop Linux users to transform their operating system until it looks like the latest Windows 8. In fact, the WinAte theme is actually perfect for this task.

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Ubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn Will Come With A Lot Of Changes

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

As you may know, Ubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn will come with interesting changes. The integration of Qt 5.3 is almost done, but the developers still have to fix some known issues.

The developers hope to make Qt 5.3 available as default next week, due to the fact it has passed 99% of the tests.

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GTK+ Support Moves Along For Unity 8 On Mir

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Canonical developers have been making progress on allowing GTK+ applications to work natively atop Ubuntu's Unity 8 desktop with the Mir display server in place of the X.Org Server or even XMir for that matter.

Robert Ancell has blogged about the work he and Ryan Lortie have been working on recently for allowing GTK+ applications to run in Unity 8 with Mir. Using their out-of-tree patches, some GNOME/GTK+ applications are starting to work natively, but there's still many items to address like GTK+ full-screen applications, cursor changes, and much more.

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Ubuntu 14.10 Now Using Linux Kernel 3.15, Version 3.16 to Follow Soon

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Linux kernel is one of the most important packages in a distro and, in fact, it's essential to the OS. Most users won't actually feel the impact of a new kernel, but having the newest one possible is very important, if only for the improved hardware support.

The Ubuntu developers have already announced that they plan to integrate Linux kernel 3.16 in the final version of 14.10. That is a doable plan and they will be able to make it happen if nothing out of the ordinary occurs.

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Cognitive Dissonance

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu is the distro people love to hate. That is ironic, as it’s spawned a larger number of currently forked distros than any other flavour of Linux. Just take a look at the GNU/Linux Distribution Timeline from futurist.se/gldt. It’s a truly nuts diagram of just how forked the Linux world has become. Totting up the currently live distros, Ubuntu is easily the most fertile with 70 forks. Debian and Red Hat have just over 60 each, and as for the total? We lost count after 280...

True, Ubuntu is a fork of Debian, but without the hard work of Canonical and its contributors I doubt those 70 distros would exist as forks of Debian. So I puzzle over the level of animosity that Canonical stirs in some sectors of the Linux community. The recent Debian debate on Systemd or Upstart generated a lot of noise against Upstart, but why would Canonical do anything but put Upstart forward as its primary choice? Why hate a company for putting its own developed project first?

Certainly, Canonical does make some odd decisions, but then many large companies do. Internal politics, lawyers, and the personal preferences of charismatic owners can sway decisions that look odd from the outside. That’s why this issue we’re going to fix Ubuntu. It’s the ideal time, too: the latest long term support release, 14.04 Trusty Tahr, is out, and you’ve likely installed it. So now’s the time to put right all those things that annoy you about Ubuntu. You can get started right now with this issue!

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Ubuntu Touch Finally Gets Beautiful Dialer and Contacts Apps

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu for phones is becoming more stable and new applications arrive every day, but some of the older core apps, like the Dialer and Contacts, remained a little behind the general design. That has changed now, as the Dialer is using the folded background concept and the Contacts entry has been improved.

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What other people are saying about Lubuntu 14.04

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Personally I think Lubuntu is great, especially for low end computers short of RAM. Lubuntu lends itself perfectly to netbooks and I wrote an article when Lubuntu 13.10 was released explaining why.

Shortly I will be showing how to try Lubuntu out without messing up your current Windows XP installation. Before I do though I thought I would list a few alternative reviews so that you can get a fully balanced opinion.

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openSUSE 13.1 vs Ubuntu 13.10: a friendly match

Filed under
SUSE
Ubuntu

Ubuntu is one of the most popular GNU/Linux-based operating system, along with Linux Mint. Ubuntu started off as a great operating system which, with the help of LUGs and communities, became extremely popular.

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Linux 3.16 Won't Land On Ubuntu 14.10 Quite Yet

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Developers are planning for Linux 3.16 to be the kernel of Ubuntu 14.10 but they're holding off on shipping any early release candidates to testers currently on Ubuntu 14.10, the Utopic Unicorn.

Today's Ubuntu kernel team meeting minutes note, "We have rebased our Utopic kernel to v3.15 final and uploaded (3.15.0-6.11). As noted in previous meetings, we are planning on converging on the v3.16 kernel for Utopic. We have started tracking v3.16-rc1 in our 'unstable' ubuntu-utopic branch. We’ll let this marinate and bake for a bit before we do an official v3.16 based upload to the archive."

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Hands-on with Canonical’s Orange Box and a peek into cloud nirvana

Filed under
Server
Hardware
Ubuntu

First off, Canonical emphasized to Ars multiple times that it is not getting into the hardware business. If you really want to buy one of these things, you can have Tranquil PC build one for you (for £7,575, or about $12,700), but Canonical won’t sell you an Orange Box for your lab—there are too many partner relationships it could jeopardize by wading into the hardware game. But what Canonical does want to do is let you fiddle with an Orange Box. It makes for an amazing demo platform—a cloud-in-a-box that Canonical can use to show off the fancy services and tools it offers.
Inside the custom orange chassis are ten stripped Intel Ivy Bridge D53427RKE NUCs. Each comes with 16GB of RAM and a 120GB SSD, and they’re all connected to a gigabit Ethernet switch. One of the NUCs is the control node; its USB and HDMI ports are wired to the Orange Box’s rear panel, and that particular node also runs Canonical’s MAAS software. Its single unified internal 320W power supply runs on a single 110v outlet—even when all ten nodes are going flat-out, it doesn't require a second power plug.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

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  • SMS based Cosmos Browser for the developing countries
    Browsing the internet has different meaning to different people. While to some the web is a source of entertainment, to others it is a valuable and source of learning. Sadly enough, the internet is not widely available and easily affordable everywhere in the globe. Slow network speed is another problem. Developer Stefan Aleksic of ColdSauce tries to find a solution in an SMS (text) based browser for the third world countries which are yet to see the internet as we know it. He has named it the Cosmos Browser. If you ever used elinks on Linux, you know how efficient and low-bandwidth text only browsing can be. Of course, it is not meant for visiting a website for downloading wallpapers, but it is more than sufficient if you want to read some information from the web. Cosmos will work on text and will not need any data plan or WiFi.
  • Keyboard Modifiers State indicator For Ubuntu: Xkbmod Indicator

today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming

Sorry, Windows 9 Fans, This Is How Multiple Desktops Should Work – Video

The Linux platform has always taken pride in this cool feature. Having multiple desktops is a great way to increase the productivity and there are numerous means to implement it. Lots of Linux distributions have this option, which is used in various ways. Read more