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Ubuntu

Ubuntu Derivatives

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Trisquel GNU/Linux 8 Alpha Is Now Available to Download

    Trisquel GNU/Linux 8.0 alpha is now available for download and testing. Based on Ubuntu 16.04, Trisquel 8.0 also ships with the MATE 1.12 desktop.

  • Linux Mint 18.1 Beta released

    Well,Just months back Linux Mint 18 got it's release,now it is the time to have the next point release of Linux Mint 18.Just few hours ago Linux Mint team has announced the availability of Linux Mint 18.1 Beta.
    As Linux Mint users , who have already moved to Linux Mint 18, might be loving it for the newly introduced themes,look & feel and features(of course,they didn't go like updating only pre-installed packages Tongue ).So,in this time, coming from rainy to winter season,they have made a good list of new improvements,features and support.

  • Linux Mint 18.1 Beta Is Out with Cinnamon 3.2 & MATE 1.16, Based on Ubuntu 16.04

    A few moments ago, Linux Mint project leader Clement Lefebvre proudly announced the release and immediate availability of the Beta version of the upcoming Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena."

Ubuntu still isn't free software

Filed under
Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth just blogged about their stance against unofficial Ubuntu images. The assertion is that a cloud hoster is providing unofficial and modified Ubuntu images, and that these images are meaningfully different from upstream Ubuntu in terms of their functionality and security. Users are attempting to make use of these images, are finding that they don't work properly and are assuming that Ubuntu is a shoddy product. This is an entirely legitimate concern, and if Canonical are acting to reduce user confusion then they should be commended for that.

The appropriate means to handle this kind of issue is trademark law. If someone claims that something is Ubuntu when it isn't, that's probably an infringement of the trademark and it's entirely reasonable for the trademark owner to take action to protect the value associated with their trademark. But Canonical's IP policy goes much further than that - it can be interpreted as meaning[1] that you can't distribute works based on Ubuntu without paying Canonical for the privilege, even if you call it something other than Ubuntu.

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Canonical Releases New Kernel Live Patch Security Update for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

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Ubuntu

On November 30, 2016, after publishing new kernel updates for all of its supported Ubuntu Linux releases, Canonical, through Luis Henriques, announced the availability of the second kernel live patch security update to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

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Also: Four New Kernel Vulnerabilities Patched in All Supported Ubuntu OSes, Update Now

Ubuntu-Based Trisquel GNU/Linux 8.0 "Flidas" Enters Development with MATE 1.12.1

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Ubuntu

The development team behind Trisquel GNU/Linux, a 100% libre distribution based on the Ubuntu Linux operating system, announced the availability of the first Alpha images for the upcoming Trisquel GNU/Linux 8.0 release.

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Devuan and Ubuntu

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • New Devuan Beta, Sharket Mare, 2016 Predictions

    Not even 24 hours after my saying there hasn't been a new Devuan release since April, the project released Beta 2 for 32 and 64-bit machines. Elsewhere, Jeremy Garcia celebrates 16 years of LinuxQuestions.org and writer-blogger Bruce Byfield today said that Linux and its application are commercial grade despite what some may think. The Ubuntu 17.04 release schedule was posted and Canonical has approved Snaps sans dependencies.

  • Systemd-Free Debian Fork Devuan Releases Its Second Beta
  • Docker and Canonical partner on CS Docker Engine for millions of Ubuntu users
  • Docker, Canonical Team Up on CS Docker Engine for Ubuntu

    When it comes to containers, Canonical has been early to make many of the right moves. The company was one one of the first to weave in platform support for Docker, which is partly significant because the majority of OpenStack deployments are built on Ubuntu.

    Now, Docker and Canonical have announced an integrated Commercially Supported (CS) Docker Engine offering on Ubuntu, meant to provide Canonical customers with a single path for support of the Ubuntu operating system and CS Docker Engine in enterprise Docker operations.

  • Ubuntu devs can now build Snaps without dependencies

    To encourage app distribution advancements, Canonical is now letting Ubuntu app developers build their Snaps without bundling their dependencies. The new support comes through the ubuntu-app-platform snap that has just been reached the Ubuntu Software store.

Canonical offers direct Docker support to Ubuntu users

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Ubuntu

Enterprise Ubuntu users running Docker in production now have a new source for Docker support: from Canonical.

Earlier today, Canonical and Docker announced joint support for the commercial edition of Docker Engine on Ubuntu. The pair also will provide updates for Docker on Ubuntu through an application delivery system Canonical originally devised.

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Ubuntu 17.04 ‘Zesty Zapus’ Details

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Ubuntu

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian Project News - November 28th, 2016

    Welcome to this year's fourth issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community.

  • 4 Snap Apps You Can Install on Ubuntu Right Now

    In the mood to read a quick round-up of a some popular desktop Linux apps that are now available to install as Snappy apps?

    Me too, so I wrote one.

    For the purposes of this post (read: cos i’m lazy) you won’t find apps that are not intended to be distributed widely listed (i.e. apps which require an argument to be passed to install them, like Dekko, LibreOffice, and others).

    If you’re on a metered internet connection (or subsisting on a slow one) installing apps as Snaps probably isn’t the most effective use of your bandwidth. Until Snap frameworks (or whatever Canonical calls Snap dependencies) arrive most Snaps that you install are bundled with everything needed to run.

  • Ubuntu Prepping Its 16.04 "Rolling HWE Kernel"

    Similar to past Ubuntu LTS (Long Term Support) releases, Ubuntu 16.04.2 and beyond will feature hardware enablement kernels back-ported from newer Ubuntu releases in order to allow new hardware to work on these older LTS releases, but now the Xenial Xerus is switching to a concept of a "rolling HWE kernel."

    Canonical's Leann Ogasawara describes the rolling HWE kernel as, "The biggest change is that we are moving to what we refer to as a "rolling HWE kernel" model. Essentially, consumers of an HWE kernel will automatically be upgraded to the next HWE kernel offered in subsequent point releases until reaching the final HWE Kernel offered in 16.04.5." So it's really not like a true rolling Linux kernel, just that you will automatically be upgraded to future HWE kernels with future LTS point releases. It's documented more at this Wiki page.

Ubuntu 17.04 Slated for Release on April 13, 2017, Final Beta Lands March 23

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Ubuntu

Today we have some great news for our Ubuntu Linux readers, as Canonical recently published the release schedule for the upcoming Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system.

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Also: Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Lands January 19, 2017, with Ubuntu 16.10's Linux 4.8 Kernel

You Can Now Package Your Apps as Snaps without Bundling Their Dependencies

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • The Systemd-Free Debian Fork Celebrates Its Second Birthday

    Devuan, the Debian fork that frees the system of systemd, is now two years old.

    Yesterday marked two years since the announcement of the systemd-free Debian fork, Devuan.

    Two years going, this Linux OS that aims for "Init Freedom" isn't the most vibrant distribution out there. When's the last time you've heard of Devuan or even used it yourself? This year much of the systemd "hate" seems to have calmed down compared to prior years, although new features continue to be tacked onto systemd. Here's an interesting Google Trends comparison for those interested.

  • Debian with three monitors under low cost graphics interface

    Since 2008 I use two monitors in my desktop. Yesterday I bought a new graphics interface and a third monitor. Some time I was looking for a low cost graphics interface. Ok, I am using GeForce GT 740 which has three output ports: VGA, DVI and HDMI. In Brazil this interface card can be found around R$ 400 (US$ 117, but my card was US$ 87 in Brazilian Black Friday). In Amazon.com, it is between US$ 51 and US$ 109. The chosen manufacturer was Zotac, but all GT 740 and 750 will work fine (I tested the GT 750 too).

  • Canonical Announces the Availability of Ubuntu Advantage VG on AWS Marketplace

    Canonical, through Udi Nachmany, head of the Ubuntu Certified Public Cloud program, was proud to announce the availability for purchase of Ubuntu Advantage Virtual Guests on the AWS marketplace.

  • Mir is not only about Unity8

    Mir is a project to support the management applications on the display(s) of a computer. It can be compared to the more familiar X-Windows used on the current Ubuntu desktop (and many others). I’ll discuss some of the motivation for Mir below, but the point of this post is to clarify the relationship between Mir and Unity8.

  • Mir/Ubuntu Developer Talks Up Mir Outside Of Unity 8

    Most talk these days of Ubuntu's Unity 8 next-gen desktop experience and their Mir display server goes hand-in-hand since the change-over is planned in-step before Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, but there's a new Ubuntu Insights blog post up working to promote Mir as more than just tech for the Unity 8 desktop.

    Canonical engineer Alan Griffith has written a blog post today about Mir outside of Unity 8. Mir's abstraction layer is providing libmiral.so as a stable library to Mir providing window manager, the miral-shell providing both traditional and tiling window manager, and miral-kiosk as a sample "kiosk" with basic window management.

  • What’s New in Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) – Overview

    Ubuntu 17.04, code named Zesty Zapus, is the future release that will succeed Ubuntu 16.10, and even though it’s End of life date has been scheduled for January 2018, the development team aims to bring a lot of upgrades, fixes, and additions in this release.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Devices

Open Source Software A Core Competency For Effective Tech M&A

Imagine your company just acquired its competitor for $100 million. Now imagine the company’s most important asset – its proprietary software – is subject to third-party license conditions that require the proprietary software to be distributed free of charge or in source code form. Or, imagine these license conditions are discovered late in the diligence process, and the cost to replace the offending third-party software will costs tens of thousands of dollars and take months to remediate. Both scenarios exemplify the acute, distinct and often overlooked risks inherent to the commercial use of open source software. An effective tech M&A attorney must appreciate these risks and be prepared to take the steps necessary to mitigate or eliminate them. Over the past decade, open source software has become a mainstay in the technology community. Since its beginnings, open source software has always been viewed as a way to save money and jumpstart development projects, but it is increasingly being looked to for its quality solutions and operational advantages. Today, only a fraction of technology companies do not use open source software in any way. For most of the rest, it is mission critical. Read more

AMD Graphics

SUSE Leftovers

  • Git, Kernels, LightDM, More update in Tumbleweed
    Topping the list of updates for snapshot 20161129 was the update to Light Display Manager 1.21.1, which added an Application Programming Interface (API) version to the greeter-daemon protocol for future enhancements. Other updates in the snapshot include openVPN, which added a recommended utility for network and traffic protocols, and subpackages for systemd relevant for 32-bit users. Desktop manager xfdesktop updated to version 4.12.3 and introduced rotating wallpaper images if the images contain rotation information. The programming language vala, which aims to bring modern programming language features to GNOME developers without imposing any additional runtime requirements, updated in the 20161129 and 20161201 snapshots.
  • openSUSE Leap 42.1 upgrade to Leap 42.2
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/49
    I’m sure nobody doubted it, but Tumbleweed is back on the roll! And in fact, we did the impossible and released 8 snapshots in a week. This review will cover {1201..1208}.