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Ubuntu

Back to the ‘buntus

Filed under
Ubuntu

openattitude.com: Many of you will consider this a huge step backwards. I consider it a small step forwards, and this fuzzy terminal grab is the reason why. Permit me to explain — but first, a quick refresher…

The joke that is Maverick’s default wallpaper

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • The joke that is Maverick’s default wallpaper
  • Making a Statement without Saying Anything

fullcircle issue 40 & new logo

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Ubuntu

fullcirclemagazine.org: It’s hard to believe, but we’re already at issue 40! We’ve got a lot of great stuff for you in this issue, including a spiffy new logo redesign by Thorsten Wilms. You might also notice a slight font change-that’s the new (official) Ubuntu font.

The New Ubuntu 10.10 Software Center

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Ubuntu

techdrivein.com: Ubuntu Software Center is something we all overlooked for long. A lot of Ubuntu users are new comers and Software Center means a lot to them. Ubuntu is gradually waking up to this fact and have finally started focusing on bringing a lot of polish and usability to Software Center.

VMware Server 2.0.2-x On Ubuntu Server 10.04 With VMware Remote Console Plug-in

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

Today I will tell you how to set up a new Ubuntu 10.04 server which runs VMware server 2.0.2-x and the VMware Remote Console Plug-in. With VMware Server you can create and run guest operating systems ("virtual machines") such as Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, etc. under a host operating system. This has the benefit that you can run multiple operating systems on the same hardware which saves a lot of money, and you can move virtual machines from one VMware Server to the next one (or to a system that has the VMware Player which is also free).

Whither the Ubuntu Tablets?

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Ubuntu

crunchgear.com: The iPod revolutionized the portable media player market. The iPhone shook up the smart phone market. But what about an Ubuntu tablet? The svelt, modular Linux kernel has breathed new life into many aging PCs, and Canonical has been working on a netbook-specific interface for Ubuntu for some time.

How Much Does Linux Need the Desktop?

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

ostatic.com/blog: Does the true future of Linux on computing devices lie outside of desktop computers? It’s no secret that on the desktop Linux has held steady at only about one percent market share for many years, and that has caused many pundits to proclaim that it will never be a truly meaningful player.

What Will Ubuntu 10.10 Look Like?

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Ubuntu

pcworld.com: When Canonical broke the news recently that Ubuntu 10.10 will include uTouch 1.0, a multitouch and gesture stack, it caused a flurry of excitement about the Linux release's potential for use in tablets.

Dell Vostro V13 review

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

linuxuser.co.uk: Lightweight notebooks usually have lightweight specs, but as John Brandon discovers, the Dell Vostro V13 is an exception to the rule…

Ubuntu 10.10 Alpha: Slouching Toward Ubuntu GNOME

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Ubuntu

earthweb.com: Ubuntu 10.10, codenamed Maverick Meerkat, is still two months from its final release. However, if the first alpha and the forecasts about it are an accurate indication, the release is already taking on a character all its own.

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