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Ubuntu

Ubuntu's Unity Turns 4, Happy Birthday!

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Ubuntu

Unity is the default desktop environment in Ubuntu and it's been around for four years now, although not for the desktop version of the distribution. It was first used in Ubuntu Netbook Remix, which was a flavor dedicated for Netbook use. In fact, Ubuntu Netbook Remix 10.10 Maverick Meerkat was the first to adopt the new Unity desktop.

The regular Ubuntu 10.10 release still used GNOME 2.x for the desktop, which is one of the reasons why some users still say that 10.10 still is the best version ever made by Canonical.

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Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) to Launch with Linux Kernel 3.16.4

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Ubuntu

The Ubuntu 14.10 development cycle has been rather uneventful and no major features have been implemented. The same cannot be said about the thousands of other packages that are used in the operating system, as most of them have been updated. This is also true for the Linux kernel.

Despite the fact that Ubuntu arrives like clockwork, every six months, its developers always try to add the latest kernel available whenever possible. Now that the development cycle is coming to an end, Canonical has finally settled on the kernel that will officially ship with the distribution.

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US Navy's First Autonomous Swarmboats Are Controlled with Ubuntu

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Linux
Ubuntu

The US Air Force has the drones, but now the US Navy has autonomous boats that can steer themselves, patrol a zone, and take a hostile posture, whatever that means. It was just a matter of time until someone thought of having some kind of drones that could guard a fleet on the water. The US Navy was happy to oblige.

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UbuTricks 14.10.08 Released

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Ubuntu

UbuTricks 14.10.08 has been released. This version arrives with 10 new added programs (two games and eight apps), a new version numbering system which follows the year.month.day scheme, and several other bug fixes and improvements.

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Meizu MX4 Pro May Give New Life To Ubuntu Touch

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Ubuntu

After a few rumors that Meizu may be using Ubuntu Touch as its "stunning new OS," there seems to be some confirmation that the rumors are real after what appears to be a Meizu MX4 Pro device was spotted in the wild running Ubuntu touch.

The Meizu MX4 Pro is rumored to come with a 5.4" screen, a 20nm Exynos 5430 from Samsung (the same one that the Galaxy Alpha uses), a 20MP camera (likely from Sony) and 3 GB of RAM. There was a leaked spec sheet pointing to 4 GB of RAM, which technically would be possible even with a 32-bit chip like the Exynos 5430, through an extension, but right now that makes little sense until 64-bit chips arrive on the mobile market.

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Sleek Mini-ITX industrial PCs come in four Intel flavors

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Linux
Ubuntu

Logic Supply unveiled four Ubuntu-ready, Mini-ITX industrial PCs based on Intel Celeron (Bay Trail and Ivy Bridge) and Core (Haswell-ULT and Haswell) CPUs.

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Jono Bacon: How to Build Exponential Open Source Communities

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Interviews
Ubuntu

Open source projects live and die by their communities. Cultivating that core group of developers, administrators, users and other contributors who work together to improve the code base is no easy task, even for experienced community managers. There are some tried-and-true methods to follow, however, pioneered by some of the best open source communities around.

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Top 4 Alternatives for iOS and Android – Firefox, Ubuntu, Tizen and Sailfish

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Linux
Moz/FF
Ubuntu

Firefox OS was developed by Mozilla and it made its appearance in 2012, but it was released one year later for smartphones and tablets, following to be used on smart TVs as well. It was built on HTML5, CSS3 and JavaScript, which means that the websites are treated as applications and the HTML5 apps are communicating with the phone’s hardware through Web APIs. This makes it unique, but it’s not just a browser that runs on a Linux-based OS. Even the camera or the dialer are considered applications, and every website that is ran in the form of an app is accessed through Gecko engine. For now, the devices that can support Fire OS are Keon and Peak by Geeksphone.

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The Ubuntu Touch RTM #3 Image Got Better support for Secure Connections and Updates For The Dialer, Messaging And Adress Book Apps

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Ubuntu

While the first Ubuntu Touch RTM (release to manufacturing) image has been made available a few weeks ago, the Ubuntu Touch RTM #3 image has been recently released, bringing better user feedback for secure connections has been implemented, the developer mode has been enhanced, and fixes for the dialer, messaging, address-book, the ofono packages have been added and the Mir display server and QtMir packages have been updated.

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Also see:

  • Meizu: Ubuntu Touch Landing On Meizu MX4 In December

    Meizu’s MX4 flagship has been launched at the beginning of last month and the device is selling like hotcakes. People around the world have ordered (and many of them already received) Meizu’s flagship. It seems like Meizu will soon get an interesting software offering. Meizu, Bq and Canonical announced their partnership a while ago and it was just a matter of time before we see Ubuntu on Meizu, that’s at least what everyone was guessing at the time.

  • UbuTricks

    UbuTricks is a Zenity-based, graphical script with a simple interface. Although early in development, its aim is to create a simple, graphical way of installing updated applications in Ubuntu 14.04 and future releases.

The Ubuntu 14.10 Upgrade: What to do

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Ubuntu

The first thing you need to know is that Ubuntu 14.10 is almost exactly like 14.04. There are virtually no visible meaningful differences as far as I can tell. So if you are using Ubuntu and are sticking with Ubuntu, don’t expect pretty fireworks. This will not be an exciting upgrade.

Second, 14.10 has an updated version of the kernel, the deep guts of the operating system, and this is important. It is good to have a current kernel. Also, this kernel has some important new hardware support. Some Dell laptops have the ability to turn off your hard drive if it feels itself falling, so the drive is not running when your laptop hits the ground. The new kernel actually supports this feature so if you have a newer Dell laptop, you might want that. There is some improvement in the handling of Dell touchpads as well. The point is, you should absolutely upgrade to 14.10 for a number of unexciting but still potentially important reasons.

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Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Delayed Until February 2, Will Bring Linux 4.8, Newer Mesa

If you've been waiting to upgrade your Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system to the 16.04.2 point release, which should have hit the streets a couple of days ago, you'll have to wait until February 2. We hate to give you guys bad news, but Canonical's engineers are still working hard these days to port all the goodies from the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) repositories to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, which is a long-term supported version, until 2019. These include the Linux 4.8 kernel packages and an updated graphics stack based on a newer X.Org Server version and Mesa 3D Graphics Library. Read more

Calamares Release and Adoption

  • Calamares 3.0 Universal Linux Installer Released, Drops Support for KPMcore 2
    Calamares, the open-source distribution-independent system installer, which is used by many GNU/Linux distributions, including the popular KaOS, Netrunner, Chakra GNU/Linux, and recently KDE Neon, was updated today to version 3.0. Calamares 3.0 is a major milestone, ending the support for the 2.4 series, which recently received its last maintenance update, versioned 2.4.6, bringing numerous improvements, countless bug fixes, and some long-anticipated features, including a brand-new PythonQt-based module interface.
  • Due to Popular Request, KDE Neon Is Adopting the Calamares Graphical Installer
    KDE Neon maintainer Jonathan Riddell is announcing today the immediate availability of the popular Calamares distribution-independent Linux installer framework on the Developer Unstable Edition of KDE Neon. It would appear that many KDE Neon users have voted for Calamares to become the default graphical installer system used for installing the Linux-based operating system on their personal computers. Indeed, Calamares is a popular installer framework that's being successfully used by many distros, including Chakra, Netrunner, and KaOS.

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