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Ubuntu

We’re More Than Mark

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Canonical, Ubuntu: We’re More Than Mark Shuttleworth
  • Review: Ubuntu 10.04 Server Edition

The Challenge of Understanding Icons

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

design.canonical.com: Icons are very peculiar images. They are both pictorial and functional. An icon is literally a picture, e.g., of a magnifying glass, and at the same time it represents a function, i.e., the query in a search. So, one and the same image is meant both to attract attention to itself and to facilitate action.

Karmic To Lucid

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Karmic To Lucid – A Few Bumps
  • Review: Ubuntu Unleased 2010 Edition: Covering 9.10 and 10.4
  • New Ubuntu Website Live

New Ubuntu Control Center

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu Control Centre project aims to make System config simple
  • Ubuntu Control Center
  • Contributing Back to Gnome?

Ubuntu 10.04 LTS: Lucid Lynx Benchmarked And Reviewed

Filed under
Ubuntu

tomshardware.com: Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, is pinning its hopes of OEM acceptance on the Lucid Lynx. We've put the screws to this new Long Term Support (LTS) release, comparing it to Canonical's previous LTS release, 8.04 Hardy Heron, to look for progress.

Five Usability Improvements in Ubuntu 10.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: Recent Ubuntu releases have introduced major changes, including a new theme, a new application stack and–gasp–a new position for window buttons. But Karmic and Lucid also included a number of tiny usability enhancements that you might not have noticed. Here’s a look at five of them.

Also: HTML5 Video on Ubuntu

Ubuntu's Unity Desktop: Reality vs. Rationales

Filed under
Ubuntu

earthweb.com: Over the past year, Ubuntu has become one of the centers for usability design on the Linux desktop. You might criticize this effort because it takes place in the distribution, rather than as contributions to the GNOME desktop, but at least it is happening.

Btrfs and the Ubuntu spin machine

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwire.com: Alone among GNU/Linux distributions, Ubuntu has managed to project the impression that it is the best first choice for someone who wants to test the Linux waters. Put this down to slick media management.

My thoughts on Ubuntu 10.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • My thoughts on Ubuntu 10.04
  • Ubuntu Linux Netbook Edition 10.04

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #194

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #194
  • Full Circle Podcast #7: Two Tin Cans and a Length of String
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Mesa's Android Support Is Currently In Bad Shape

While Mesa is talked about as being able to be built for Google's Android operating system to run these open-source graphics drivers on Android devices with OpenGL ES support, in reality there's a lot left to be desired. Over the years there's been a handful of developers working on Android Mesa support to let the popular open-source graphics drivers run over there -- from the Intel driver now that they're using HD Graphics within their low-power SoCs (rather than PowerVR), AMD has made a few steps toward Android netbook/laptop devices with Radeon graphics, and we're starting to see Gallium3D drivers for Qualcomm Adreno (Freedreno) and the Raspberry Pi (VC4) where there's interest from Android users. This year as part of Google Summer of Code we also might see a student focused on Freedreno Android support. Read more