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Ubuntu

The Ubuntu 14.10 Upgrade: What to do

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Ubuntu

The first thing you need to know is that Ubuntu 14.10 is almost exactly like 14.04. There are virtually no visible meaningful differences as far as I can tell. So if you are using Ubuntu and are sticking with Ubuntu, don’t expect pretty fireworks. This will not be an exciting upgrade.

Second, 14.10 has an updated version of the kernel, the deep guts of the operating system, and this is important. It is good to have a current kernel. Also, this kernel has some important new hardware support. Some Dell laptops have the ability to turn off your hard drive if it feels itself falling, so the drive is not running when your laptop hits the ground. The new kernel actually supports this feature so if you have a newer Dell laptop, you might want that. There is some improvement in the handling of Dell touchpads as well. The point is, you should absolutely upgrade to 14.10 for a number of unexciting but still potentially important reasons.

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With This Many Linux Games On Steam, You Could Almost Drop Windows

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GNU
Linux
Gaming
Ubuntu

It didn’t happen overnight, but Steam’s catalogue of Linux games has grown significantly over the last few years, no doubt helped by the release Value’s Debian-powered SteamOS. Abandoning Windows for the open source platform was once the quickest way to gaming frustration, be it a lack of native ports or wrestling with the likes of Wine or other virtualisation option, but with almost 700 working titles available, the variety is certainly there.

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Linux micro computer runs Android and Ubuntu

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Android
Linux
Ubuntu

We have discovered another Linux computer module, the HummingBoard from Israeli firm SolidRun.

The HummingBoard allows you to run many open source operating systems – such as Ubuntu, Debian and Arch, as well as Android and XBMC.

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IBM Expands POWER8 Server Portfolio with Ubuntu Linux

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GNU
Linux
Server
Ubuntu

IBM today is expanding its POWER8 server lineup as part of the company's continuing effort to provide a competitive alternative Intel x86-based server systems.

The Power8 silicon and server system first debuted in April. One of the new systems is the IBM Power S824L server.

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Ubuntu Touch RTM Video Tour

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Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Touch operating system has just received a new RTM branch and the developers are working hard to provide a stable and good operating system. We've put together a video tour of Ubuntu Touch.

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Ubuntu MATE Will Steal the Show of the Ubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn Launch

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu MATE is a new flavor based on Ubuntu that will see an official launch alongside all the other regular ones on October 23, and it's very likely that it will steal the show.

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People Still Want Ubuntu Edge to Happen

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Ubuntu

Back in July 2013, Canonical proposed a new type of smartphone, an extremely powerful device that would be built with the best the industry had to offer at that point. It's safe to say that it attracted a lot of attention and that people keep wondering if there still is a chance to see something like it.

The crowdfunding campaign aimed to raise $32 million (€25.3 million), but it fell short and only managed to gather $12.8 million (€10 million). Even with less than half of what it needed for this project to succeed, Ubuntu Edge still remains one of the most successful crowdfunding campaigns.

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Mir 0.8 Works On Less ABI Breakage, Touchspots, Responsiveness

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Ubuntu

While Ubuntu 14.10 on the desktop isn't using Mir by default, Mir 0.8.0 is being prepared for release by Canonical and it has a number of interesting changes.

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Ubuntu 14.10 Fans, Prepare for "It's a Boring Release" Comments

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Ubuntu

Canonical made a very good release back in April. Ubuntu 14.04 LTS was very well received and it integrated many features. It was very different from Ubuntu 13.10, so it was spared the "boring" rhetoric. On the other hand, Ubuntu 14.10 will not bring any important visible changes to the operating system and it will be very difficult to set it apart from Ubuntu 14.04 LTS.

Many users will be tempted to think that nothing has changed, but an operating system is complex and it has many components that are not visible to the regular users and that can contribute a great deal to the overall performance of the OS.

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Ubuntu GNOME Devs Encouraged by Ubuntu Team to Add Latest GNOME in Future Versions

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GNOME
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu GNOME makers have been encouraged by an important Ubuntu developer to implement the latest build of the GNOME desktop environment in the future versions of their distro.

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Today in Techrights

OSS and Sharing/Standards Leftovers

  • Linux Announces New Open Network Automation Platform Project
    The Linux Foundation has announced the creation of the new Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project with the merger of Open Orchestrator Project (OPEN-O) and open source ECOMP. This new platform will help in designing, automating, orchestrating, and managing network services and virtual functions by creating a comprehensive and a harmonized framework that allows virtual network functions to be automated by using real-time, policy-driven software.
  • Open-Source Networking Is Coming of Age
    Service providers of all sizes and types should take note of some changes occurring across the open-source community—changes that promise to accelerate the adoption of software-defined networks (SDN). The first is a decision by AT&T to open source the ECOMP management and orchestration (MANO) framework it developed via the Linux Foundation. Through a variety of working groups, the foundation has been accelerating the development of core network function virtualization (NFV) software and associated SDN technologies. But a big piece missing from that equation has been the management plane.
  • CAVO Continues to Advance Open Source for Democracy [Ed: Remember what Microsoft did there]
    OSI Affiliate Member, the California Association of Voting Officials (CAVO), has shared some exciting news regarding their advocacy work in San Francisco: according to the San Francisco Examiner, the city of San Francisco is pushing forward with plans to develop their open source election system. In addition, the paper is reporting that the San Francisco Elections Commission voted unanimously on Feb 17th to request $4 million to fund the initial stages of the open source voting system. For many years board members of CAVO have been urging San Francisco to expedite, "the creation and deployment of a GPL v3 open source / paper ballot printing system that would set the standard for voting systems nationally." According to CAVO, currently only New Hampshire has deployed a voting system using open source software, Prime III.
  • Mozilla Acquires Pocket, Will Open Source Pocket Code
    Chances are you've heard the new: Mozilla has acquired Pocket, the go-to 'read it later' service, and says it plans to open-source Pocket code in due course.
  • The Speed Of LLVM's LLD Linker Continues Looking Good
    LLVM's LLD linker still isn't too widely used yet on Linux systems, but the performance of this linker alternative to GNU Gold and GNU ld are quite compelling. We've written many times before about the much progress and better performance of "the LLVM linker" while some new numbers were committed to the LLD documentation.
  • Welcome to Code.mil - an experiment in open source at the Department of Defense!
  • DoD Announces the Launch of “Code.mil,” an Experiment in Open Source
    The Department of Defense (DoD) announced the launch of Code.mil, an open source initiative that allows software developers around the world to collaborate on unclassified code written by federal employees in support of DoD projects.
  • An Introduction to Open Data Kit

Leftovers: Software

  • Linux Command Line Browser To Surf Internet
    Links is an open source text and graphical web browser with a pull-down menu system. It renders complex pages, has partial HTML 4.0 support (including tables and frames and support for multiple characters sets such as UTF-8), supports color and monochrome terminals and allows horizontal scrolling. It’s very useful for low resources computers because day by day the web pages are bigger and heavier. If your computer doesn’t have a suitable performance you’ll have some mistakes while you’re surfing. So, Links is much faster than any common web browser (with GUI) because it doesn’t load all the content of a website, for example, videos, flash, etc.
  • Stacer – The Linux System Optimizer You’ve Been Waiting For
    System optimizer apps are quite the thing on platforms such as Windows and Android. Their usefulness, however, is debatable considering how notorious they are when it comes to using system resources. On the Linux platform, however, we can almost always find the applications, a developer puts their time in developing to be mostly useful. Stacer is one such app created to better optimized your Linux PC in the sense that it packs quite the list of features you’d normally expect from an optimizer and more to give your system a refresh whenever you feel the need.
  • Ulauncher – A Lightweight Application Launcher for Linux
    Each Desktop environment has the own launcher and doing their job nicely but it take a while to launch the application whenever we are searching. Ulauncher is a lightweight application launcher that loads instant search results, usese low resources, and remembers your previous choices and automatically selects the best option for you. It’s written in Python and uses GTK as a GUI toolkit. When you are typing wrong application name, after few words or spelling, it will figure out what you meant. Use Ulauncher to open your files and directories faster with fuzzy search. Type ~ or / to start browsing. Press Alt+Enter to access the alt menu.

Linux Kernel and Graphics