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Ubuntu

Ubuntu Touch x86 emulator improves security, OpenGL

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Ubuntu

Some amazing news came down the pipeline today, from Ricardo Salveti of Canonical Ltd., for Ubuntu touch users and developers. Updates to the X86 emulator surfaced, which include increased TLS (Transport Layer Security) measures, and use of Qt packages that will be compatible with OpenGL 2.0. The combination of Qt packages and OpenGL ES 2.0 should produce sleeker rendering and font. Use of Open GL 2.0 brings programmable rendering pipelines, similar in fashion to OpenGL 3.0

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You'll NEVER guess who's building the first Ubuntu phones in 2014

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Ubuntu

The first smartphones running Ubuntu will ship this year, Canonical now says – although the Linux vendor's hardware partners are hardly the first companies you might guess.

In January, Ubuntu community manager Jono Bacon said that getting major carriers on board with the upstart mobile OS was "longer-term," and that the first Ubuntu smartphones would be built by small manufacturers who serve small regions. Apparently he wasn't kidding.

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Apple 'snapped up' sapphire displays, says Canonical founder

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Mac
Ubuntu

"Apple just snapped up three year's worth of the supply of sapphire screens from the company that we had engaged to make the screens for the Edge," he said (at roughly the 30:45 mark linked to above). The report about the sapphire display comments first appeared at Gigaom.

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Joyent Partners with Canonical on Customized Ubuntu as a Cloud Service

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Ubuntu

Joyent, well-known on the cloud computing scene and a growing player in Big Data analytics, announced a partnership with Canonical today to provide customers with optimized and supported Ubuntu server images in the Joyent Cloud. Effectively, users will be able to leverage a Canonical-customized Ubuntu in the cloud. The two companies also want to enable developers and enterprises to create mobile, big data and high-performance applications on Ubuntu and Joyent's OS-Virtualized cloud platform.

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Systemd dominates and Debian, Ubuntu, Git updates – Linux Snippets

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Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

Systemd – the d is for dominates: The Debian Technical Committee decided that, after quite a bumpy process, that it would follow Fedora, Arch Linux, Mageia and openSUSE in planning to switch to systemd in the next release. The Debian change rippled down to Ubuntu where, probably sooner than anyone anticipated, Mark Shuttleworth announced that Ubuntu would switch too.

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Ubuntu phones arriving in 2014 from Meizu and BQ Readers

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Ubuntu

Canonical is finally poised to enter the mobile market. After years of teases, promises and demos, the company has locked up the first two manufacturers of Ubuntu phones. Meizu and BQ Readers will be releasing handsets with the Linux-based OS installed on them sometime in 2014. Details about release date, price and specs are still to be determined, but we were told to expect more info at Mobile World Congress (which kicks off this weekend). The list of supporting carriers also remains a mystery, but at least we know that there will be consumer-ready Ubuntu phones on the market before the end of the year. Mark Shuttleworth, Canonical's founder, is keeping things close to his chest, but he did say that two more manufacturers with "household names" should be coming on board in 2015.

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Mesa 10.1 Should Make It Into Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

Mesa 10.1 brings many new OpenGL features, new hardware support, and as with most Mesa updates is a very worthwhile upgrade for users of the open-source Linux graphics stack. There's been many articles about Mesa 10.1 on Phoronix while there's also the Mesa 10.1 feature overview. Mesa 10.1 itself is in a release candidate stage but should be officially released later this month on 28 February.

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After Vodafone, Smart Communications Has Also Joined The Ubuntu’s Carrier Advisory Group (CAG)

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Ubuntu

Hello Linux Geeksters. Recently, Smart Communications, a mobile carrier from Philippines, has joined Ubuntu’s Carrier Advisory Group (CAG), in order to support Ubuntu Touch, the mobile version and Ubuntu, and sell phones with Ubuntu for phones pre-installed.

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Why do you need license from Canonical to create derivatives?

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Ubuntu

No one knows…

Last year during an interview Jonathan Riddell, the lead developer of Kubuntu, told us that Ubuntu teams were telling Linux Mint that they needed a license from Canonical in order to use compiled packages from Ubuntu.

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9-Way AMD Radeon Comparison On Ubuntu With Catalyst 14.1 Beta

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Ubuntu

For those curious how AMD's Catalyst Linux performance is doing as we get 2014 underway with the first Catalyst 14.1 beta, here are benchmarks from nine different AMD Radeon graphics cards under Ubuntu Linux and running this latest publicly available driver when looking at both the OpenGL graphics and OpenCL compute performance.

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