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Ubuntu: Crazy Justice, Mir, and Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo

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Ubuntu
  • The developer of Crazy Justice has shown off a quick teaser of it on Ubuntu

    Black Riddles Studio has finally shown Crazy Justice [Official Site] on Ubuntu, although it's only a small teaser of their third-person shooter it has me excited.

    Crazy Justice is the third-person shooter developed by two brothers, which was crowdfunded on Fig where they managed to get $51K in funding. Since the campaign finished, they've hit just shy of $70K thanks to people pre-ordering it.

    They later announced a Battle Royale mode, which has me excited because Linux doesn't really have one currently. You could argue we have stuff with last man standing modes, sure, but they're quite different. Given how popular the BR genre is, it will be sweet to have it on Linux. As a reminder, the Early Access release should hopefully be available before the end of June. Looks like I might be getting an early birthday present this year…

  • Logind Support For Mir Is Getting Closer To Working

    Mir developers have been working on support for systemd's Logind and there is a "mess of a branch" that is nearly functionally complete and could soon be merged.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E10 – Ten Little Ladybugs - Ubuntu Podcast

    This week we’ve been smashing up a bathroom like rock stars. We discuss the Ubuntu 18.04 (Bionic Beaver) LTS release, serve up some command line love and go over your feedback.

Ubuntu: Crazy Justice, Mir

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • The developer of Crazy Justice has shown off a quick teaser of it on Ubuntu

    Black Riddles Studio has finally shown Crazy Justice [Official Site] on Ubuntu, although it's only a small teaser of their third-person shooter it has me excited.

    Crazy Justice is the third-person shooter developed by two brothers, which was crowdfunded on Fig where they managed to get $51K in funding. Since the campaign finished, they've hit just shy of $70K thanks to people pre-ordering it.

    They later announced a Battle Royale mode, which has me excited because Linux doesn't really have one currently. You could argue we have stuff with last man standing modes, sure, but they're quite different. Given how popular the BR genre is, it will be sweet to have it on Linux. As a reminder, the Early Access release should hopefully be available before the end of June. Looks like I might be getting an early birthday present this year…

  • Logind Support For Mir Is Getting Closer To Working

    Mir developers have been working on support for systemd's Logind and there is a "mess of a branch" that is nearly functionally complete and could soon be merged.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E10 – Ten Little Ladybugs - Ubuntu Podcast

    This week we’ve been smashing up a bathroom like rock stars. We discuss the Ubuntu 18.04 (Bionic Beaver) LTS release, serve up some command line love and go over your feedback.

Ubuntu: 32-bit Fate, Ubuntu 18.10 "Cosmic Cuttlefish" Slated for Release on October 18th, AFL in Ubuntu 18.04 is Broken

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Developers Once Again Debate Dropping i386 Images, Then Discontinuing i386 Port

    While the Ubuntu desktop official images are no longer 32-bit/i386 and more Ubuntu derivatives are dropping their 32-bit x86 installers, not all 32-bit images/installers have been discontinued and the i386 package archive / port remains. That matter though is back to being debated.

    As has been common to see every once in a while over the past few years, Ubuntu developers are back to debating the i386 status following the latest Ubuntu 18.04 LTS cycle. Canonical's Bryan Quigley is proposing that i386 be dropped -- initially for images/installers but with an end goal of dropping the i386 port.

  • Firefox Quantum, Bcachefs, Ubuntu, Devuan 2.0

    It would seem that the main Ubuntu distribution may not be the only *buntu to drop support for 32-bit x86 (i386) architectures. A proposal has just been put forth by Bryan Quigley to drop support for Lubuntu, Xubuntu, Kylin and Kubuntu.

  • Ubuntu 18.10 "Cosmic Cuttlefish" Slated for Release on October 18, 2018

    Now that we know the codename of the next Ubuntu release, Ubuntu 18.10, it's time to take a closer look at the release schedule, which suffered some changes for this cycle, and the proposed release date.

    Development on Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) kicked off officially earlier this week with the latest GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) 8.1 release, though it's not yet the default system compiler. However, Canonical plans to migrate from GCC 7, which is currently used in the latest Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) release to the GCC 8.x series.

  • AFL in Ubuntu 18.04 is broken

    At is has been reported on the discussion list for American Fuzzy Lop lately, unfortunately the fuzzer is broken in Ubuntu 18.04 “Bionic Beaver”. Ubuntu Bionic ships AFL 2.52b, which is the current version at the moment of writing this blog post. The particular problem comes from the accompanying gcc-7 package, which is pulled by afl via the build-essential package. It was noticed in the development branch for the next Debian release by continuous integration (#895618) that introducing a triplet-prefixed as in gcc-7 7.3.0-16 (like same was changed for gcc-8, see #895251) affected the -B option in way that afl-gcc (the gcc wrapper) can’t use the shipped assembler (/usr/lib/afl-as) anymore to install the instrumentation into the target binary (#896057, thanks to Jakub Wilk for spotting the problem).

Ubuntu: Livepatch, Microsoft's Belly, and Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Screenshots Tour

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Ubuntu
  • How to set up Livepatch and the information gathering tool in Ubuntu 18.04

    Ubuntu Bionic Beaver is here and it brings along with it a number of very useful and shiny new features. Two of those features appear in the first-run wizard: One of which is Livepatch. With Livepatch up and running, many security-related updates, such as the kernel, will not require a reboot. For anyone that's served as a Linux admin, you know how big a step forward that is. What Canonical has done with Livepatch, in Ubuntu 18.04, is fairly remarkable. I say that because the setup of this new feature is incredibly simple. In fact, on first boot, you are greeted with a wizard that walks you through the process.

    Within that same first-run wizard is the notorious information gathering tool. Rumors of Canonical collecting user data were rampant, which led to many believing a breach of privacy was imminent. The reality is much less intrusive. I'm going to show you how easy it is to set up this often mission-critical feature on the latest iteration of Ubuntu Linux. I'll be demonstrating on the desktop version of the release. You'll be surprised at how easy it is.

  • Build 2018: Ubuntu support is coming to the Subsystem for Linux on Windows 10 on ARM [Ed: Microsoft aspires to see GNU/Linux viewed as a "Windows feature" of Vista 10 "selling point" rather than an independent thing (UEFI blocks it on some PCs)]

    It was almost exactly one year ago today that Microsoft shocked the world by announcing developers would be getting Ubuntu support on Windows 10 via the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL.) This was great, and yesterday at a breakout session at Build 2018, Microsoft hinted that Windows 10 on ARM WSL is also getting support for Ubuntu and other Linux distributions (via Neowin.)

  • Windows on ARM is getting 64-bit app support… and a Linux subystem

    Oh, and it looks like the move will also let you use the Windows Subsystem for Linux on ARM PCs, allowing you to run native Linux apps on the HP Envy x2, Asus NovaGo, or Lenovo Miix 630.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Screenshots Tour

    The ‘main' archive of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will be supported for 5 years until April 2023. Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will be supported for 5 years for Ubuntu Desktop, Ubuntu Server, and Ubuntu Core. Ubuntu Studio 18.04 will be supported for 9 months. All other flavors will be supported for 3 years.

Canonical Outs Kernel Security Update for Ubuntu 17.10, 16.04 LTS, and 14.04 LTS

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Security
Ubuntu

Following in the footsteps of the Debian Project, which recently released a similar kernel security patch for Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" and Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" operating system series to address two security vulnerabilities, Canonical also released kernel updates to patch these two flaws and another vulnerability in Ubuntu 17.10, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS.

One of these security vulnerabilities was caused by the way Linux kernel handled debug exceptions delivered via Mov SS or Pop SS instructions, which could allow a local attacker to crash the system by causing a denial of service. The issue (CVE-2018-8897) was discovered by Nick Peterson and affects only the amd64 architecture.

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Ubuntu: Next Release and Microsoft EEE

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 18.10 Planning For GCC 8.1, OpenJDK 11, Python 3.7

    With Mark Shuttleworth yesterday having announced the Cosmic Cuttlefish, the development cycle for Ubuntu 18.10 is formally open.

    Matthias Klose opened up the Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic cycle and syncs from Debian unstable are now done as well as importing GCC 8.1.0 but not yet making it the default. Around June or July is when they plan on shifting the default C/C++ compiler from GCC 7.3 to the recently released GCC 8.1 and then rebuilding the package archives. GCC 8 brings many features and improvements that will be great for Ubuntu 18.10.

  • Ubuntu 18.10 will be called Cosmic Cuttlefish

    With Ubuntu 18.04 LTS out of the way for the development teams, Ubuntu 18.10 marks the beginning of the Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. Shuttleworth also outlined that he wants the next cycle to heavily focus on improving the security situation, which is probably a good goal in a world which is seeing growing cyber attacks, with Linux having seen triple the number of malware threats in the last few years.

  • Ubuntu 18.10 is called Cosmic Cuttlefish and will focus on security

    The next incarnation of Ubuntu, version 18.10, will be known as Cosmic Cuttlefish, with the focus set to be on making the operating system more secure.

    The new name was announced by Mark Shuttleworth, CEO of Canonical, who hinted at what would happen on the journey to Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (the next Long Term Support release, which happens every two years, and gives users who stay on it five years’ worth of support).

    Shuttleworth stated that he was starting to value security above any other feature of the distro, underlining its overarching importance in every aspect of an OS. His broad vision is to improve the confidence users have in the “security of their systems and their data”.

  • Microsoft is bringing Ubuntu Linux to Windows 10 on ARM

    It was this time last year that Microsoft announced that it was bringing Ubuntu to the Windows Store (now the Microsoft Store), along with other Linux distributions. If you check out the app in the Store now though, you'll find that it only works on x64 devices, meaning that you can't run it on any of the new Windows 10 on ARM PCs.

    That's all about to change though. In a session at Microsoft's Build 2018 developer conference today called Windows 10 on ARM for Developers, the company showed off Ubuntu running on an ARM PC, with the app coming from the Microsoft Store. It will finally support ARM64 PCs, although x86 devices are still out of luck.

Ubuntu 18.04: Unity is gone, GNOME is back—and Ubuntu has never been better

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 18.04 is a huge update, but I say that mostly in the best sense of big updates. It brings a ton of new stuff, both under the hood and on the desktop, without creating too much disruption to your workflows. The one exception to that is HUD users, who may want to stick with the version of Unity still in the Ubuntu repos.

Canonical generally takes a conservative approach to LTS updates. Existing 16.04 users will not be prompted to upgrade to 18.04 until the first point release is out, and usually that happens around June or July (but it depends on bugs and patches). I would also expect to see Windows Update make it easy to integrate 18.04 into hypervisor on a similar timeline. But if you're already on 17.10 and don't want to wait—and for the average user, I don't see any reason to wait—you can update now by following Canonical's directions. The best Ubuntu offering in years will be waiting for you either way.

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Ubuntu: Cosmic Cuttlefish, Server and Snaps

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Ubuntu
  • Cosmic Cuttlefish is now open for development

    Cosmic CANIMAL [1] is now open for development, with the syncs from unstable done and built. The development version starts with only a few changes:

  • Ubuntu 18.10 "Cosmic Cuttlefish" Is Now Officially Open for Development

    Canonical's Matthias Klose announced on Tuesday that the upcoming Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) operating system is now officially open for development.

    Now that Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth dubbed Ubuntu 18.10 as the "Cosmic Cuttlefish," it's time for the development cycle to kick off officially, and it looks like there's some under-the-hood change to start with, including the final GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) 8.1.0 release, as well as the transition to ncurses.

  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 08 May 2018
  • An introduction to Zenkit – now available as a snap

    In October 2016, Zenkit was released as an app designed to help you ‘organise anything’, enabling companies to digitise all of their business processes in a single app. It’s innovative approach to presenting data has since garnered worldwide attention, and high demand for desktop apps led to the release of apps for Windows, macOS, and some Linux distributions in February this year.

    This week, Zenkit has been released as a snap – the universal Linux packaging format – fulfilling the team’s desire to make Zenkit a platform and device agnostic tool.

Ubuntu 18.10 Operating System Dubbed "Cosmic Cuttlefish" by Mark Shuttleworth

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Ubuntu

We already knew for about a week or so, when the first daily build ISO images popped-up on the main servers, that Ubuntu 18.10's codename will start with Cosmic, but we did not new the animal mascot it will be accompanied by. So today Mark Shuttleworth announced the full codename of Ubuntu 18.10 as the "Cosmic Cuttlefish".

"With our castor Castor now out for all to enjoy, and the Twitterverse delighted with the new minimal desktop and smooth snap integration, it’s time to turn our attention to the road ahead to 20.04 LTS, and I’m delighted to say that we’ll kick off that journey with the Cosmic Cuttlefish, soon to be known as Ubuntu 18.10," said Mark Shuttleworth in a blog post.

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Also: Ubuntu 18.10 Is Codenamed The "Cosmic Cuttlefish", Will Focus On Security

Next Generation Ubuntu Linux Installer Could Use HTML5, Electron, and Snaps

Ubuntu: The Latest Release and the Next One

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Ubuntu
  • What is the Latest Version of Ubuntu?

    The latest version of Ubuntu is Ubuntu 18.04 LTS “Bionic Beaver,” which was released on April 26, 2018. Canonical releases new stable versions of Ubuntu every six months, and new Long Term Support versions every two years.

  • ‘Next Gen’ Ubuntu Installer Outlined by Mark Shuttleworth

    Helping kick-start discussion about what shape this new Ubuntu installer could take is none other than Ubuntu’s self-appointed benevolent dictator for life, Mark Shuttleworth.

    In an e-mail sent the Ubuntu Developer mailing list he invites developers to join him in helping to ‘sketch’ out a fuller proposal.

    Ubuntu created its Ubiquity installer to let users “…try out Ubuntu [on a live CD], and then dive straight into the install“, a concept Shuttleworth says once seemed like ‘science fiction’.

  • Mark Shuttleworth Talks Of New Ubuntu Installer Ideas With HTML5/Electron & Snaps

    Mark Shuttleworth has publicly expressed some ideas for a next-generation Ubuntu desktop installer.

    While Ubuntu Server 18.04 has a brand new installer, the Ubuntu "Ubiquity" installer hasn't changed all that much over the past decade. We've seen changes here and there from the once-working Windows data importer feature to taking a web camera picture for your account, but for the most part Ubiquity has been kept the same since it was first introduced as part of the Ubuntu LiveCD/USB experience. It looks though like Canonical may begin working on a next-generation installer.

  • Cue the Cosmic Cuttlefish

    With our castor Castor now out for all to enjoy, and the Twitterverse delighted with the new minimal desktop and smooth snap integration, it’s time to turn our attention to the road ahead to 20.04 LTS, and I’m delighted to say that we’ll kick off that journey with the Cosmic Cuttlefish, soon to be known as Ubuntu 18.10.

    Each of us has our own ideas of how the free stack will evolve in the next two years. And the great thing about Ubuntu is that it doesn’t reflect just one set of priorities, it’s an aggregation of all the things our community cares about. Nevertheless I thought I’d take the opportunity early in this LTS cycle to talk a little about the thing I’m starting to care more about than any one feature, and that’s security.

  • What is new Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Desktop

    The ‘main' archive of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will be supported for 5 years until April 2023. Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will be supported for 5 years for Ubuntu Desktop, Ubuntu Server, and Ubuntu Core. Ubuntu Studio 18.04 will be supported for 9 months. All other flavors will be supported for 3 years.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 526

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 526 for the week of April 29 – May 5, 2018. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • How to install Hyperledger Fabric on Ubuntu

    Hyperledger Fabric is a blockchain framework implementation that you can use as a foundation for developing applications or solutions with a modular architecture. It's quite a challenge to install, but once you have it up and running (and have started developing applications that make use of the blockchain framework) it will be well worth your time. The good news is that it's all open source and runs on open source platforms, so there is no software cost investment. There is of course a time investment. But this will be time worth spent.

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