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Ubuntu

Unity 8

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • What’s In Store for Unity 8 in Ubuntu 17.04 (And Beyond)

    October’s release of Ubuntu 16.10 gave us our first real look at Unity 8 in its formative desktop guise.

    But as we noted in our hands-on article at that time, Unity 8 on the desktop, while somewhat functional, offers a somewhat basic user experience.

  • A Couple New Vulnerabilities, Unity 8 Futures

    Another day, another vulnerability; The Register today reported that a new local vulnerability that can allow someone root access. Hack A Day also reported on a bug, this one sounded so fun the way they explained it. Elsewhere, OMG!Ubuntu! and Phoronix previewed Unity coming attractions sourced from Ubuntu 17.04 UOS summit notes and DarkDuck gave Debian 8 a quick run-through.

    [...]

    The last look at Unity 8 gave users a bit of pause, but upcoming releases promise to be much improved. While focusing on a "full desktop experience," convergence is still the key word of the day. They plan to make Snaps more important and rely less on .debs (eventually removing them altogether), they want to move the apps scope and dash into an "app drawer." They hope to add multi-monitor support and implement full window management (app windows, dialog boxes, context menus, tool tips, and the like). OMG!Ubuntu! and Phoronix have more on that.

  • Unity 8 & All Snaps-Based Ubuntu Still Expected For 18.04 LTS

    Today during the Ubuntu Online Summit for Ubuntu 17.04 was a convergence Q/A talk where Unity 8 and delivering a all-Snaps image (no Debian packages) were talked about for nearly one hour.

Ubuntu Online Developer Summit

Filed under
Development
Ubuntu
  • A Very Basic Ubuntu Online Developer Summit Is Happening Now

    Today and tomorrow is a very basic Ubuntu Online Summit (UOS) where the developers are plotting their work for Ubuntu 17.04, the Zesty Zapus.

  • Ubuntu Online Summit for Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) Starts Today, November 15

    Today, November 15, 2016, is the first day of the Ubuntu Online Summit (UOS) event put together by Canonical for the upcoming Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) Linux-based operating system.

    It's not the first time we inform our readers about Ubuntu Online Summit taking place between November 15-16, 2016, but today is the big day, so we had to write another story just to make sure we've got your attention. The event welcomes all members of the community, as well as Ubuntu developers, and takes place online, so it's free.

Ubuntu 16.10 & Unity 8 overview

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

The one thing that made me not try to blowtorch my laptop in anger after I was done reviewing the terrible Yakkety Yak was the inclusion of the Unity 8 desktop environment in the distro, allowing for some fresh testing. The word desktop is probably not the best vocabulary choice here, as this hybrid-like environment already blithely powers touch devices like the Ubuntu Phone and the M10 tablet. But we're on a laptop, so.

Anyhow, I wanted to explore Unity 8 some more, but I did not want to do it as part of the distro review. This is why we have this article here, to explore the merits and failings of Unity 8, and see whether we should be really afraid this may become the default and only choice for our desktops one day. Which it might. So read carefully.

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How to Secure Your Ubuntu Network

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Ubuntu

In 2016, keeping your Ubuntu network secure is more important than ever. Despite what some people might think, there's much more to this than merely putting up a router to protect a network. You must also configure each of your PCs properly to ensure you're operating within a secure Ubuntu network. This article will show you how.

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Create Your Own Ubuntu 16.10 Live ISO with the New Linux For All (LFA) Distro

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Arne Exton, the developer of many GNU/Linux distributions and Android-x86 flavors, announced today, November 16, 2016, the release of a new version of his Linux For All (LFA) Live DVD.

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You Can’t Move Window Controls to the Right on Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

Many of you may recall that this switch wasn’t without controversy. Many users were not happy with the change, which they felt was too ‘mac-esque’ and a break with conventional window button placement.

The good news was that any one who didn’t like the default placement could change the position of window control buttons back to right-hand side. An entire crop of 3rd-party tools, hacks and apps grew up with this option present among them Unity Tweak Tool.

As the years have passed, so too has the memory of this drama. Most of us have long since gotten used to left-aligned window controls, and would find a sudden change back to the right almost as jarring!

One of our Twitter followers got in touch with us this weekend to ask how to move the window buttons to the right in Ubuntu...

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Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 Slightly Delayed, New Task Manager Gets Fuzzy Background

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Ubuntu

After informing us earlier this month about the new task manager that will be implemented in the upcoming Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 update for Ubuntu Phone and Tablet devices, reader Tomas Vicik is back with more interesting tips.

It appears that Tomas Vicik is using the rc-proposed channel on this Ubuntu Phone to get an early taste of the new features coming to the Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system developed by Canonical for various smartphone and tablet models.

He wrote in his last email that the appearance of the default Scopes was refreshed and it looks great, and that the new task manager now features a fuzzy background, which should enchant fans of the Ubuntu Touch OS.

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Docker 1.13.0 Enters Development, to Add Support for Ubuntu 16.10 and Fedora 25

Filed under
Server
Ubuntu

This past weekend, the developers of the popular Docker open-source application container engine have published the first Release Candidate (RC) snapshot of the upcoming Docker 1.13.0 release.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu and Derivatives

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Mir windowing system in Kodi

    It will be compile time support, meaning you’ll need to compile with mir support specifically. As Kodi does not support runtime windowing selection. This also means it’ll have a low risk to the main code base. The port supports both opengl and opengles. I also need to test this out on an embedded device (such as raspi/dragon board). Ideally creating a nice kiosk Kodi media center would be awesome running on mir!

  • It’s official!

    The budgie-remix team is pleased to inform the community that the Ubuntu Technical Board has granted official community flavor status to our distro. We are pleased to join and be part-of the superb Ubuntu family.

    Starting from today the distro will be known as Ubuntu Budgie.

  • Ubuntu Budgie Becomes An Official Ubuntu Flavor

    Ubuntu Budgie is now officially an Ubuntu flavor. The team behind Ubuntu Budgie aims at making 17.04 (expected in April, 2017) its first release.

  • List of PPA Repositories for Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak

    This article provides a list of many popular applications PPAs for Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak. It provides PPA addresses for LibreOffice, GIMP, Inkscape, SimpleScreenRecorder, and some more applications (I listed only free software here, please tell me if I made any mistake). It's not complete for now, I will update it when it's needed.

  • We’re Now Hosting Valadoc.org

    About a year ago, we contributed a major visual overhaul to Valadoc.org. This is an essential tool for elementary OS development. Good docs are important both for new and old developers. However, we’ve recently seen some trouble with the server. There has been downtime and, more importantly, search stopped working completely. But, with a little bit of elbow grease, we’ve addressed the situation.

    We’ve seen a number of Valadoc.org mirrors sprout up, all with their own problems as well (namely, links to specific pages broken, which is also a huge issue). Instead of creating our own mirror, we reached out to Florian Brosch (who runs Valadoc.org) and started drafting a way to move forward that keeps uptime of the website high and ensures that important features that were broken got fixed.

Ubuntu 16.10 Flavors Comparison: Ubuntu vs Ubuntu GNOME vs Kubuntu vs Xubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

As promised in my earlier Ubuntu 16.10 review, I have come up with an Ubuntu 16.10 flavors comparison as well, although, I was planning on coming up with this comparison much sooner (but hey, it’s here!)

Unlike in my Ubuntu 16.04 LTS flavors comparison which only included two main Ubuntu flavors (Ubuntu GNOME & Kubuntu), this time, I’ve also added Xubuntu 16.10 to the comparison because it was requested by a couple of my readers. The ISO disc image sizes are as follows: Ubuntu 16.10 (1.6 GB), Ubuntu GNOME 16.10 (1.5 GB), Kubuntu 16.10 (1.6 GB) & Xubuntu 16.10 (1.3 GB). And also, I only chose the 64-bit versions of the disc images for the flavors review as well.

And in this comparison, I’ll only be comparing the performance related data, the stability and hardware recognition of each flavor. I’ll skip new features and whatnot, because you can find information about those features elsewhere, quite easily.

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Parental Controls for Linux Unleashed

For years, one of the overlooked areas for the Linux desktop was access to “effective” parental controls. Back in 2003, I remember the now defunct Linspire (then known as Lindows) offered a proprietary option called SurfSafe. Surprisingly, at least back then, the product worked very well in providing accurate content filtering capabilities; something that was not,in fact, available and easy-to-use at that time. Years later, an open-source alternative was released to the greater Linux community known as GNOME Nanny. Fantastic in terms of usage control, its web content web filter was laughably terrible. As expected, crowd-sourcing a filtering list isn’t a great solution. And like SurfSafe, the project is now defunct. Read more

Chapeau 24 Cancellara - Same same but different

Fedora plus Moka icons plus some extra software, mainly coming from proprietary sources. I guess that's the best way to describe Chapeau. But then, what separates one distro from another if not a collection of decorations, as software is essentially the same, apart from a very small number of standalone distributions trying to develop their own identity with their own desktop environments and app stack, re: elementary or Solus + Budgie? Except they struggle, too. Chapeau 24 is a nice effort to make Fedora friendlier, but then it does not achieve the needed result without pain. The biggest issues included a botched smartphone support. Samba woes and the horrible bootloader bug. Other than that, it behaved more or less the same way as the parent distro. Then again, why bother if you can pimp up Fedora without any loss of functionality? I do like Chapeau Cancellara, but I cannot ignore the fact Fedora does the same with fewer problems. All in all, it's a welcome effort, but it needs more polish. It does not quite capture the heart the way Fuduntu did. And with some issues looming high above the distro, the grade can only be about 6/10. Most importantly, the bootloader setup must be flawless, and there's not excuse for small app errors that we've seen. We know it can do more. Anyhow, if you're not keen on any self-service round Fedora, this could be a good test bed for your games. A moderately worthy if somewhat risky and flawed experience. Read more

Mofo Linux: The Raw Materials for Security

The developers of Mofo Linux talk a good game. From the name’s origin in abusive street slang to its self-description on the home page as “Linux designed to defeat state censorship and surveillance,” Mofo presents itself as a champion of security and privacy. Nor is the claim unjustified. However, rather than putting security and privacy into the hands of ordinary users, Mofo simply presents the tools and leaves users to figure them out with a minimum of help. The result is a promising distribution that with only slightly more work, could be a leading one. Just possibly, though, this approach is a deliberate tactic, and not the carelessness it appears. Based on Ubuntu, the current release of Mofo offers nothing different in the way of productivity tools. It uses Unity for a desktop, and its applications are the standard GNOME ones. In fact, Mofo shows such little interest in such matters that it does not bother to change the title bar in the installer from Ubuntu. Read more

Happily Announcing Mageia 5.1

As we’re getting closer to the end of the year, Mageia has a present for you! We are very pleased to announce the release of Mageia 5.1! This release – like Mageia 4.1 was in its time – is a respin of the Mageia 5 installation and Live ISO images, based on the Mageia 5 repository and incorporating all updates to allow for an up to date installation without the need to install almost a year and a half worth of updates. It is therefore recommended for new installations and upgrades from Mageia 4. The new images are available from the downloads page, both directly and through torrents. Read more Also: After a long wait, Mageia was released! Well, sort of...