Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ubuntu

How Ubuntu is helping to optimize Google Cloud

Filed under
Google
Software
Interviews
Ubuntu

While the products that Ubuntu provides — such as Canonical Livepatch Service and Juju — are well-known in the cloud community, its corporate stance is not as recognized. It’s hoping to change that perception.

“Ubuntu is a very popular [operating system], and we are most dominant in public cloud,” explained Udi Nachmany, vice president of public cloud at Ubuntu.

Read more

Canonical Releases New Kernels for Ubuntu Linux to Fix a Single Vulnerability

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

Canonical published several security advisories to inform Ubuntu users about new kernel versions for their Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) operating systems.

Read more

QNAP Announces TS-453Bmini NAS That Supports Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

NAS boxes have changed a lot over the years. From dumb storage, to multi-user storage, routing and network services, to web servers, to cloud servers, to full-blown media centers and PCs that can perform all of the above. QNAP is one of the leading NAS providers and it’s now releasing a new model with a lot of functionality.

The TS-453Bmini is a 64-bit quad-core 4-bay NAS built using an Intel J3455 Celeron processor, and is an update to the 2015 model, the TS-453mini (no B in the name). It’s a 10W TDP CPU that’s built on Apollo Lake, the successor to Braswell, and is the same generation chip as Kaby Lake (but for low power devices).

Read more

Core i7 6800K Linux CPU Scaling Benchmarks With Ubuntu 16.10

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

Earlier today I posted some Linux game CPU scaling benchmarks using a Core i7 6800K Broadwell-E For showing how current Linux games make use of (or not) multiple CPU cores, which originated from discussions by Linux gamers following the AMD Ryzen CPU launch with how many cores are really needed. While going through the process of running those Linux game CPU scaling benchmarks, I also ran some other workloads for those curious.

For those wondering how other Linux CPU-focused workloads are scaling across multiple CPU cores with recent versions of the Linux kernel and distributions, such as Ubuntu 16.10 with Linux 4.8, you may find these additional data-sets interesting. Some of the used tests are also in common with this weekend's AMD Ryzen CPU Core Scaling Performance article.

Read more

Also: CPUFreq Governor Tuning For Better AMD Ryzen Linux Performance

Canonical Releases Snapd 2.23 Snappy Daemon with GalliumOS & Linux Mint Support

Filed under
Ubuntu

Michael Vogt from Canonical's Snappy team was pleased to announce the immediate availability of version 2.23 of the Snapd daemon that provides support for Snap packages in Ubuntu and other GNU/Linux distributions that have adopted Snappy.

Snapd 2.23 is supposed to be a major release, and we can't help but notice that there are quite some new features implemented, starting with support for GalliumOS, a fast and lightweight GNU/Linux distribution designed for Chromebooks, as well as the new Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena" operating system, which is based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

Read more

Leftovers: Debian and Ubuntu

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • What to Do After Installing Debian

    Debian organizes everything, so it is not a surprise that much of working with post-install Debian involves enabling the right repositories and selecting packages from them.

    This approach means that, although configuring Debian naturally overlaps with the configuration of most Linux distributions, it has a perspective that takes awhile to fully grasp and appreciate.

    The easiest time to configure Debian, of course, is during installation, and Debian's detailed installer makes it trivial to setup even many advanced features before your first login. However, needs and preferences differ and develop, and after you enter your password for the first time, Debian has all the tools you need to configure everything you need. The only catch is that finding what you need can sometimes take a while.

  • New video demos Ubuntu Personal 16.04 on Aquaris M10 tablet

    German YouTuber Alex has published a new (german) video on his “Warum Linux Besser Ist” (“Why Linux is better”) channel detailing how to install Ubuntu Personal 16.04 on the bq Aquaris M10 FHD tablet.

    For the installation process he uses the magic-device-tool created by fellow Ubuntu member Marius Quabeck. Among its many supported device and operating system combinations, the magic-device-tool also offers an option for installing the latest (“staging”) image on the bq Aquaris M10 FHD tablet (both the official Ubuntu version and the Android version). This image identifies itself as “Ubuntu 16.04 (r157)” and was released on March 3, 2017.

  • Playing Games on Ubuntu Core
  • Mir and graphics on Ubuntu Core

    Mir is a set of libraries for implementing a display server for Linux, developed by Canonical since 2012 and aimed at replacing the X Window System. It stands in competition with Wayland. Both are designed to be faster, more secure (X11 lets any application snoop on any other application and grab the whole screen), and generally better than the aging X Window System (which was mainly developed for remote connections to mainframes).

Debian and Ubuntu

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Norwegian Bokmål translation of The Debian Administrator's Handbook complete, proofreading in progress

    For almost a year now, we have been working on making a Norwegian Bokmål edition of The Debian Administrator's Handbook. Now, thanks to the tireless effort of Ole-Erik, Ingrid and Andreas, the initial translation is complete, and we are working on the proof reading to ensure consistent language and use of correct computer science terms. The plan is to make the book available on paper, as well as in electronic form. For that to happen, the proof reading must be completed and all the figures need to be translated. If you want to help out, get in touch.

  • My Free Software Activities in February 2017

    We have reached the end of Stretch’s development cycle, a phase called full freeze. That means packages may only migrate to Testing aka Stretch after approval by the release team. Changes must be minimal and only address important or release critical bugs. This is usually the time when I stop uploading new upstream releases to unstable to avoid any disruptions. Of course there are exceptions but if you are unsure best practice is to use experimental instead. A lot of RC bugs are still open and affect the next release. In February I could close five one and triage two more.

  • How Often Do You Change Your Desktop Wallpaper? [Poll]
  • Meet the $30 Ubuntu-Ready NanoPi M1 Plus

    And many pack in more powerful specs than the humble fruit-based offering that’s most popular. We’ve seen the Orange Pi PC 2, the Pine A64, the ODROID, and many more.

    Joining the fray is the $30 NanoPi M1 Plus from FriendlyElec. The board is two-thirds the size of a Raspberry Pi, and already has Ubuntu Core and Ubuntu MATE images ready for it.

Linux Lite 3.4 Beta Is Based on Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS, Doesn't Ship with Linux 4.8

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Linux Lite creator Jerry Bezencon announced the release and immediate availability for download of the first Beta release of the upcoming Linux Lite 3.4 open-source computer operating system.

Read more

More Benchmarks Of The Latest Ubuntu 17.04 vs. Clear Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

For this round of testing was an Intel Xeon E3-1245 v5 Skylake system with MSI C236A WORKSTATION motherboard, 32GB DDR4-2133 memory, 120GB Samsung 850 EVO SSD, and integrated HD Graphics P530.

Read more

Linux hacker board has WiFi, BT, GbE, 8GB eMMC, and $30 price

Filed under
Android
Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

FriendlyElec has launched a $30, open spec “NanoPi M1 Plus” SBC with a quad-A7 SoC, onboard wireless, 8GB eMMC, a 40-pin RPi interface, and a GbE port.

FriendlyELEC (AKA FriendlyARM) has released a more feature-rich version of its community-backed, $15 NanoPi M1 SBC. The $30 NanoPi M1 Plus retains the 1.2GHz quad-core, Cortex-A7 Allwinner H3 SoC and 600MHz Mali-400 MP2 GPU, but adds features that meet or exceed those of the quad -A9 Samsung Exynos based NanoPi M2 ($25) and octa-core -A53 Exynos NanoPi M3 ($35). The NanoPi M1 Plus joins nine other NanoPi boards listed in our most recent Linux hacker board roundup — the most of any other vendor.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Late Night Linux, Bad Voltage, and Effective Communication in Podcasting

  • Late Night Linux – Episode 06
    Jesse is back but this time Félim is in his sick bed so it’s a 3 man show yet again. Some heated debates about Nextcloud’s actions, Ubuntu extended support and PowerPC distros, followed by a deep dive into the world of HiDPI 4k support in Linux.
  • Bad Voltage Live at SCaLE 15x
    The Bad Voltage live stage show, from SCaLE 15x in Pasadena, March 2017!
  • Effective Communication in Podcasting
    When I got serious about doing Linux videos on YouTube, I drew on all of that Old Media experience plus I took a few classes to make sure I knew what I was talking about before handing out advice to others. That has led to the EzeeLinux project. The goal of EzeeLinux is to educate folks about Linux and get them started on the right path to success… I have been truly humbled by the response it has gotten. That said, I don’t feel like I’m competing with anyone – the more, the merrier! I honestly feel that Linux and Open Source Software are arguably one of the few truly good things happening in the world today. It brings people from all over the world together and provides a means to get cutting edge technology into the hands of anyone, anywhere who wants to take the time to learn how to use it regardless of their financial situation. That is the kind of power that can quite literally change the world, folks. No one should be left behind in this Information Age. Come to think of it, Ed Murrow would probably do a documentary about Linux if he was still around today… It would be right up his street, I think. It’s the kind of thing he liked to talk about.

Leftovers: Software

  • [Video] Linux Audio Programs Compared 2017
    I made this video for those that are new to, or just interested in making music on the Linux OS. I go over the features, goods and bads of Rosegarden, LMMS, Ardour, Mixbus, and EnergyXT, as well as touch on Qtractor. I don't don't go much into details of the particular versions I am using, but the video was made in the early part of 2017 and I'm running Ubuntu 16.04LTS.
  • Green Recorder: A Simple Desktop/Screen Recorder for Linux
    Green Recorder is a simple, open source desktop recorder developed for Linux systems built using Python, GTK and FFmpeg. It supports most of the Linux desktop environments such as Unity, Gnome, Cinnamon, Mate, Xfce and so on. Recently it has been updated to work with Wayland too in Gnome session.
  • Komorebi: A New Way To Enhance Your Desktop Using Animated/Parallax Wallpapers
    In past there were applications that allowed us to run videos/Gif as wallpaper on the desktop and make desktop look much cooler but than all of sudden the development of such Apps stopped and I can't name any App that exist for this purpose. Komorebi is fairly new application designed to make your desktop experience much better and make desktop cool as well, we can say it is kind of 'live wallpaper' situation here or 3D wallpaper. It is developed by Abe Masri and available under GPL license for free.
  • Stacer Sytem Optimizer: A Must Have Application For Ubuntu/Linux Mint
    There are multiple ways to optimize your Linux, the most geeky way is using Terminal, there are also applications available that performs such actions like Bleachbit, Ubuntu cleaner and so on. Stacer is simple, open-source, quick and new application designed to offer you all-in-one optimizer for your Ubuntu/Linux Mint (It's alternative to CCleaner but only for Linux).
  • Qtox: Open Source and Fully Secure Skype Replacement for Linux
    Long years ago, we've talked about a Skype alternative called Tox which was still in its early developmental stages. Tox was supposed to become the anti-thesis of Skype by being a fully open-source video and voice chat client that placed user privacy and security at its center. Well, guess what, there are now fully active and well-maintained chat clients that are built on top of Tox protocol. qTox is one of them.
  • Rclone 1.36 Released With SFTP And Local Symlinks Support, More
    Rclone 1.36 was released recently, bringing support for SFTP, local symbolic links support, mount improvements, along with many other new features and bug fixes. For those not familiar with Rclone, this is a cross-platform command line tool for synchronizing files and folders to multiple cloud storages, which supports Dropbox, Google Drive, Amazon S3, Amazon Drive, Microsoft One Drive, Yandex Disk, and more. It can be used to sync files either from your machine or from one cloud storage to another.
  • Streamlink Twitch GUI 1.2.0 Adds Support For Communities And Team Pages, Basic Hotkeys
    Streamlink Twitch GUI (previously Livestreamer Twitch GUI) is a multi-platform Twitch.tv browser. The application is powered by Node.js, Chromium and Streamlink, though it can still use Livestreamer (which is no longer maintained) too.
  • Code Editor `Brackets` 1.9 Released, Available In PPA
    Brackets is a free, open source code editor focused on front-end web development (HTML, CSS and JavaScript).
  • Terminix Terminal Emulator Renamed To Tilix, Sees New Bugfix Release
    [Quick update] Terminix, a GTK3 tiling terminal emulator, has been renamed to Tilix due to some trademark issues.

today's howtos

Games and CodeWeavers/Wine

  • A Snapshot of Linux Gamers, Just One Year Ago
    It’s about time we share the analysis of that Q1 2016 survey (fielding occured in March last year), especially as we are about to launch the Q1 2017 one pretty, pretty soon. That way we will be able to compare how things have changed over the course of 12 months. As usual, the whole disclaimer about online surveys is valid here (data is only as good as your n size, the appropriateness of your sampling, and the quality of the responses, etc…), but assuming it’s not all that bad and all that unreliable, let’s dig in the results. As a reminder, most of the respondents for this survey were recruited through the r/linux and r/linux_gaming subreddits, as well as the readership of BoilingSteam. This is not our first survey, and you can see our previous ones done in the second quarter of 2015, and the following one in the last quarter of 2015.
  • Slime-san Coming To PC, Mac and Linux
    Headup Games and Fabraz proudly announce their upcoming action-platformer Slime-san for PC, Mac and Linux via Steam & Humble Bundle. Console releases will follow soon after. Jump and slime your way through 100 levels in a unique 5-colored, pixelated world and escape from a giant worm’s innards. Get your shopping done in Slumptown, a town full of survivors within the worm. Unlock different play styles, outfits, shaders and even multiplayer mini-games! Slime-san is developed by Fabraz, an independent development studio that also released the critically-acclaimed games Cannon Crasha and Planet Diver. Slime-san was minding his own business, sliming around in a peaceful forest when suddenly…A giant worm appeared and gobbled him up! Now deep within the worm’s belly, Slime-san has to face a decision: Be digested by the incoming wall of stomach acid... Or jump, slide and slime his way through the worm's intestines and back out its mouth!
  • CodeWeavers Announces CrossOver 16.2.0
  • The Wine Revolution is ON!
    As you know Codeweavers (and other WINE contributors) have been working on DX11 support for a while – they were supposed to have DX11 support by the end of 2016, but as with all complex projects, timelines tend to slip and only very DX11 titles could run a few months ago. Since then, there was no major announcement, but it seems that the progress has been very significant in the recent WINE versions (2.3 is already out).