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10 Best Ubuntu 13.04 Features

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  • 10 Best Ubuntu 13.04 Features
  • Ubuntu Touch betas are ready for testing
  • My experiments installing Ubuntu 13.04 with UEFI
  • Ubuntu Community Survey 2013

Ubuntu 13.04: GNOME vs Unity User Interface Update

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Ubuntu Even as Canonical forges ahead to make Unity the basis of Ubuntu for PCs, phones, tablets and TVs, Linux backer is once again officially supporting GNOME.

Ubuntu 13.04 Sneak Peek

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Ubuntu Ubuntu 13.04 beta 2 has been released, so I thought I’d check it out for a sneak peek.

Ubuntu 13.04: What's New, What's Not

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Ubuntu Ubuntu 13.04, the latest Linux distribution upgrade from Canonical, arrives April 25. Code-named Raring Ringtail, here's what to expect from the new Ubuntu release.

Ubuntu File Sharing

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Setting up various methods for Ubuntu file sharing has become easier over the years. In this article, I'll highlight several of the available Ubuntu file sharing options. I'll also point out where to find them and provide links for downloads.

OpenMandriva Delayed, Mageia Releases Beta

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  • OpenMandriva Delayed, Mageia Releases Beta
  • DistroRank Weekly rankings posted - 4/4/13
  • Emmabuntüs 2 celebrated Software Freedom Day
  • Bytemark donation boosts reliability of Debian's core infrastructure
  • Moving to Arch from Ubuntu!
  • Ubuntu “Raring Ringtail” hits beta, disables Windows dual-boot tool
  • Three Ubuntu Linux versions will reach end of life in May

Ubuntu vs. Mint: Which Linux Distro Is Better for Beginners?

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Ubuntu There's nothing like digging into your first Linux distribution. But which distribution is actually better for beginners? Here, we'll delve into the differences between Ubuntu and Mint.

Canonical Announces Ubuntu for Washing Machines

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Humor After announcing Ubuntu for phones and tablets, it seems like there's no stopping to Canonical's growth. Following a 2-day countdown that teased its impatient fans, Canonical finally unveiled its latest innovation: Ubuntu for washing machines (Ubuntu WM OS).

Mark Shuttleworth ‘Most Disruptive Name in Computing’ Says Forbes

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Ubuntu Mark Shuttleworth has been named as one American magazine Forbes‘ ’12 Most Disruptive Names in business’

Unity In Use By Norwegian Military

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  • [Ubuntu In The Wild] Unity In Use By Norwegian Military
  • How to change your privacy settings in Ubuntu's Unity Dash
  • Ubuntu’s Chinese Spin ‘Kylin’ Adds Custom Icons, Tweaked Theme
  • Get Your Fingerprint Reader Working in Ubuntu
  • Upgrade to Ubuntu 13.04 Right Now!
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 309
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Intel Cache Allocation Technology / RDT Still Baking For Linux

Not mentioned in my earlier features you won't find in the Linux 4.9 mainline kernel is support for Intel's Cache Allocation Technology (CAT) but at least it was revised this weekend in still working towards mainline integration. Read more Also: Intel Sandy Bridge Graphics Haven't Gotten Faster In Recent Years

Distributing encryption software may break the law

Developers, distributors, and users of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) often face a host of legal issues which they need to keep in mind. Although areas of law such as copyright, trademark, and patents are frequently discussed, these are not the only legal concerns for FOSS. One area that often escapes notice is export controls. It may come as a surprise that sharing software that performs or uses cryptographic functions on a public website could be a violation of U.S. export control law. Export controls is a term for the various legal rules which together have the effect of placing restrictions, conditions, or even wholesale prohibitions on certain types of export as a means to promote national security interests and foreign policy objectives. Export control has a long history in the United States that goes back to the Revolutionary War with an embargo of trade with Great Britain by the First Continental Congress. The modern United States export control regime includes the Department of State's regulations covering export of munitions, the Treasury Department's enforcement of United States' foreign embargoes and sanctions regimes, and the Department of Commerce's regulations applying to exports of "dual-use" items, i.e. items which have civil applications as well as terrorism, military, or weapons of mass destruction-related applications. Read more

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