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Ubuntu

Get Your Ubuntu to Look like Mac OS X with a Simple Theme

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Mac
Ubuntu

Most of the themes that can pull this Mac OS X transformation work on desktop environments like GNOME, MATE, Xfce, and so on, but not all of them work in Unity. The designer of this particular version made it compatible with GTK 3.10 and it works in Ubuntu as well.

“The goal is to keep it as close as possible to ambiance on the code base with the same look as the original cupertino. If that isn’t possible for an element I will prefer the look of cupertino,” said the designer on gnome-look.org.

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Ubuntu 14.04 - There has never been a better time to switch to Linux

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Ubuntu

You would think that writing about the latest version of Ubuntu 14.04 would be easy but it is hard to write about one of the biggest Linux distributions without repeating everyone else's sentiments or covering the same ground that was covered with Ubuntu 13.10.

With that in mind please don't be disappointed that much of what I will be writing here has been written before.

There is nothing revolutionary about Ubuntu 14.04, especially if you have already tried Ubuntu 13.10, Ubuntu 13.04, Ubuntu 12.10 and Ubuntu 12.04. The improvements to Ubuntu have been slow and steady.

So what does that say about Ubuntu? Have they ran out of ideas? Is it a distribution just coasting along on former successes?

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Apple introduces Unity Scopes-like search and no one cries foul

Filed under
Mac
Ubuntu

This week, Apple announced the new OS X Yosemite, and Linux users across the Linux-verse stood up and proclaimed "Oooo, I'd like to lay my hands on the lily-livered swab is writ that forgery!" Why so up in arms? Because Apple has done what Apple does -- riff on features from other platforms and claim they've recreated a wheel that will make your life far easier. What did they do this time? Let's chat.

One of the big features of OS X Yosemite is included in the Spotlight tool. For those who don't know, Spotlight is the OS X search tool that, up until Yosemite, searched the local drive. As of Yosemite, anyone who has touched the Ubuntu Unity Dash will notice something very similar to Scopes.

[...]

When Ubuntu released Unity Scopes, a very large and very vocal group from the Linux community cried foul, that Scopes was an invasion of privacy, was insecure, and would probably steal their identity...

...maybe not that last bit. But there was plenty of backlash from the community (many of whom didn't even use Ubuntu).

How will the Apple community react when they start using the Scopes-like feature in Yosemite? They'll love it. They'll realize how convenient it is to be able to, from one location, search their local drive, Wikipedia, Amazon.com, and countless other sources.

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Ubuntu MATE Flavor Could Arrive Soon, Prototype Looks Great Already

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu distribution features numerous flavors, like KDE, Xfce, and LXDE, but not all the major desktop environments are used. It looks like a new one is brewing, based on MATE.

Ever since the introduction of Unity, some of the Ubuntu users have been pining after GNOME 2, the desktop environment in use until Ubuntu 11.04 arrives. It looks like it had a lot of fans and a part of the Linux community is still hoping that the good days will return.

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Trying Out kGraft Live Kernel Patching On Ubuntu Linux

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Linux
Ubuntu

KGraft is the SUSE-developed approach to live-patching the Linux kernel as another reboot-less option similar to Ksplice.

Besides kGraft and Ksplice, Red Hat coincidentally shortly after the release of Ksplice had announced Kpatch as their means of live patching a running kernel. Both Red Hat and SUSE have open-sourced their live patching mechanisms and both hope to have their solution mainlined, or some unified form of both. While no solution has been queued up for merging in the Linux 3.16 kernel, there still is a lot of interest by Linux developers in these solutions.

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Private file and mail server gizmo runs Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

OpenProducts is prepping an Ubuntu-based private file and email server called OPI with LUKS-based microSD encryption, and optional USB or cloud backup.

Like Sher.ly’s recently announced Sherlybox, the OpenProducts OPI device runs Linux, and is intended to enable a private cloud controlled solely by the user. While the Sherlybox is more of a network attached storage (NAS) device with optional onboard storage, OPI is a multifaceted, secure server that offers NAS-like access to external storage. Unlike the Lima device, which depends on USB storage, OPI instead uses encrypted microSD storage.

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The Calculator, Calendar And Music Applications, Part Of The Ubuntu Touch Core Apps Have Received Support For The Click Store

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Ubuntu

According to Alan Pope, one of the Ubuntu developers, The Calendar, Calculator and Music applications, part of the Ubuntu Touch Core Apps have received support for the Click Store, meaning that this apps can be easily kept up to date via the Click Store update manager, without needing a second developer to authorize the process.

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Ubuntu MATE Flavor Could Arrive Soon, Prototype Looks Great Already

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu distribution features numerous flavors, like KDE, Xfce, and LXDE, but not all the major desktop environments are used. It looks like a new one is brewing, based on MATE.

Ever since the introduction of Unity, some of the Ubuntu users have been pining after GNOME 2, the desktop environment in use until Ubuntu 11.04 arrives. It looks like it had a lot of fans and a part of the Linux community is still hoping that the good days will return.

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Canonical to Release an RTM Version of Ubuntu for Phones

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Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Touch development has been powering on for the last year and a half, and Canonical has made great progress. The Ubuntu for phones operating system has been separated in a number of branches, and one of them is considered stable.

From time to time, the Ubuntu devs promote an image that passes all the internal tests to the stable branch but, for a mass release of the system, the OS will have to be much better.

That is the reason why the technical lead for the Foundations Team, Colin Watson, made a very interesting proposition regarding a new Ubuntu Touch version that will be designated RTM (release-to-manufacture).

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Canonical Officially Sets the Release Date for Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn)

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Ubuntu

Canonical has finally settled on a release date for the Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) and the previous, temporary date announced has been changed by a week.

Shortly after the launch of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Canonical started to work on the next version of Ubuntu, 14.10. This is quite normal and the development cycle for Ubuntu is about six months. Also, the version number of Ubuntu says that it has to arrive in October.

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today's howtos

icons and Themes: Vamox , Ashes, and DamaDamas

  • Vamox Icons Offers Three Color Variants for Linux Desktop
    Vamox icons were designed as a university thesis project by Emiliano Luciani and Darío Badagnani in 2008. The objective was to design a interface of a distro that the university could use for learning about design thin free software, From start these icons were developed for Ubuntu. Now these icons has three variants blue, orange and red, which are compatible with most of the Linux desktop environments such as: Gnome, Unity, Cinnamon, Mate, Xfce and so on. We have added these icons to our PPA for Ubuntu/Linux Mint and other related distributions, If you are using distribution other than Ubuntu/Linux Mint/its derivatives then download icons and install it in one of these "~/.icons" or "/usr/share/icons/" location. If you find any missing icons or problem with this icon set then report it to creator via linked page and hopefully it will get fixed soon.
  • Ashes Is A Light Theme For Your Linux Desktop
    Ashes theme is based on Adapta and Flat-Plat theme but it includes the mixture of blue and pink color scheme with gray search entity. Usually derived themes always try to make better and enhanced version by the person who forked it, to make desktop much perfect and elegant, same thing goes for this theme, it looks and feels great on almost every desktop. Mainly it is designed to work in Unity and Gnome desktop but it can also work in other desktops such as Cinnamon, Mate, and so on. For the Gnome desktop creator have added the dark title-bar/header-bar support, so you can enable Global-Dark-Theme using Gnome-Tweak-Tool, if you prefer dark title-bars. If you are using distribution other than Ubuntu/Linux Mint/its derivatives then download theme from here and install it "~/.themes" or "/usr/share/themes/" location. If you find any kind of bug or issue within this theme then report it to creator and since this theme is in active development hopefully it will be fixed soon.
  • DamaDamas Icons Looks Great And At The Same Time Give Windows Flavor
    If you have been searching for Windows icons for your Linux desktop then you are at the right place. The DamaDamas icons are from Pisi GNU/Linux and available for every Linux distribution, these icons give Windows look and feel to your desktop. There isn't much information available for these icons but the icons are SVG format and there are almost 4000+ icons packed in very fairly sized archive. We have added these icons to our PPA and these icons are compatible with almost every desktop environment such as: Gnome, Unity, Cinnamon, Xfce, Mate, KDE Plasma and so on. If you find any missing icons or problem with this icon set then report it to creator via linked page and hopefully it will get fixed soon.

Ubuntu MATE 17.10 Alpha 2, Solus 3, OpenMandriva Lx 3.02, and More

KDE: QtWebEngine on FreeBSD, KDE PIM, Akademy 2017, Craft, Accessibility, Comics Manager for Krita, Progress on Kube

  • QtWebEngine on FreeBSD
    Tobias and Raphael pushed the button today to push QtWebEngine into FreeBSD ports. This has been a monumental effort, because the codebase is just .. ugh. Not meant for third-party consumption, let’s say. There are 76 patches needed to get it to compile at all. Lots of annoying changes to make, like explaining that pkg-config is not a Linux-only technology. Nor is NSS, or Mesa, while #include is, in fact, Linux-only. Lots of patches can be shared with the Chromium browser, but it’s a terrible time-sink nonetheless.
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  • KDE PIM in Randa 2017
    Randa Meetings is an annual meeting of KDE developers in a small village in Swiss Alps. The Randa Meetings is the most productive event I ever attended (since there’s nothing much else to do but hack from morning until night and eat Mario’s chocolate :-)) and it’s very focused – this year main topic is making KDE more accessible. Several KDE PIM developers will be present as well – and while we will certainly want to hear other’s input regarding accessibility of Kontact, our main goal in Randa will be to port away from KDateTime (the KDE4 way of handling date and time in software) to QDateTime (the Qt way of handling date and time). This does not sound very interesting, but it’s a very important step for us, as afterward, we will finally be free of all legacy KDE4 code. It is no simple task, but we are confident we can finish the port during the hackfest. If everything goes smoothly, we might even have time for some more cool improvements and fixes in Kontact ;-)
  • Services Collaborating Openly at Akademy 2017
    At the recently concluded Akademy 2017 in the incredibly hot but lovely Almería, yours truly went and did something a little silly: Submitted both a talk (which got accepted) and hosted a BoF, both about Open Collaboration Services, and the software stack which KDE builds to support that API in the software we produce. The whole thing was amazing. A great deal of work, very tiring, but all 'round amazing. I even managed to find time to hack a little bit on Calligra Gemini, which was really nice. This blog entry collects the results from the presentation and the BoF. I realise this is quite long, but i hope that you stick with it. In the BoF rundown, i have highlighted the specific results, so hopefully you'll be able to skim-and-detail-read your specific interest areas ;)
  • Akademy 2017 - A wonderful experience
    Akademy 2017 was such a great experience, that I would love to share with you all in this post.
  • Akademy 2017 - Recap
    Last month I had opportunity to visit the Almería, Spain for Akademy 2017. Akademy 2017 is KDE’s annual world summit. Akademy makes it possible to meet the felow KDE contributors, some of whom you only know with their IRC nicknames (Yes, I am not old enough to know every contributors yet :p). Here is few things I did at the Akademy 2017.
  • My Adventures on Crafting part III – Craft Atelier
    Once upon a time, I start o use Craft, an amazing tool inside KDE that does almost all the hard work to compile KDE Applications on Windows and MacOS. Thanks to the great work of Hannah since last year Randa Meetings, Craft is becoming a great tool. Using all the power of Python, I started to be able to work on the deploy of AtCore for Windows.
  • Why YOU care about accessibility, and can help!
    Accessibility (a11y for short) seems like a niche area of concern for many people. I was thinking about this recently on a hot morning in Spain, walking to the bus station with my wheeled luggage. The sidewalks are thoughtfully cut out for wheelchairs -- and those with luggage! and the kids riding skateboards, and...... the rest of us.
  • Writing a comics manager for Krita
    Those who know me, or at the least know my history with Krita is that one of the prime things I personally want to use Krita for is making comics. So back in the day one of the things I did was make a big forum post discussing the different parts of making a comic and how different software solves it. One of the things about making a comic is that is a project. Meaning, it is big and unwieldy, with multiple files and multiple disciplines. You need to be able to write, to draw, to ink, to color. And you need to be able to do this consistently.
  • Progress on Kube
    We’ve been mostly focusing on ironing out UX problems all over the place. It turns out, when writing desktop applications using QtQuick you’ll be ending up with a lot of details to figure out for yourself.