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Ubuntu

Prepare to Say Good Bye to Ubuntu 13.10 Saucy Salamander

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Ubuntu

Canonical is preparing to pull the plug on Ubuntu 13.10 (Saucy Salamander), the operating system that was launched only nine months ago.

Ubuntu 13.10 (Saucy Salamander) was released on October 17, 2013 and the developers from Canonical have announced right from the start that they intend to only provide support for nine months.

This latest announcement finally corrects the support period for all the Ubuntu OSes. After Canonical switched from 18 months to 9 months of support, some unusual situations were created with the upgrade path, but now everything is in order...

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Make Ubuntu and Debian Look Windows 8 with a Single Click

Filed under
Microsoft
Debian
Ubuntu

There is no love between Linux and Windows users, but that doesn't stop Linux users to transform their operating system until it looks like the latest Windows 8. In fact, the WinAte theme is actually perfect for this task.

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Ubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn Will Come With A Lot Of Changes

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

As you may know, Ubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn will come with interesting changes. The integration of Qt 5.3 is almost done, but the developers still have to fix some known issues.

The developers hope to make Qt 5.3 available as default next week, due to the fact it has passed 99% of the tests.

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GTK+ Support Moves Along For Unity 8 On Mir

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Canonical developers have been making progress on allowing GTK+ applications to work natively atop Ubuntu's Unity 8 desktop with the Mir display server in place of the X.Org Server or even XMir for that matter.

Robert Ancell has blogged about the work he and Ryan Lortie have been working on recently for allowing GTK+ applications to run in Unity 8 with Mir. Using their out-of-tree patches, some GNOME/GTK+ applications are starting to work natively, but there's still many items to address like GTK+ full-screen applications, cursor changes, and much more.

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Ubuntu 14.10 Now Using Linux Kernel 3.15, Version 3.16 to Follow Soon

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Ubuntu

The Linux kernel is one of the most important packages in a distro and, in fact, it's essential to the OS. Most users won't actually feel the impact of a new kernel, but having the newest one possible is very important, if only for the improved hardware support.

The Ubuntu developers have already announced that they plan to integrate Linux kernel 3.16 in the final version of 14.10. That is a doable plan and they will be able to make it happen if nothing out of the ordinary occurs.

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Cognitive Dissonance

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu is the distro people love to hate. That is ironic, as it’s spawned a larger number of currently forked distros than any other flavour of Linux. Just take a look at the GNU/Linux Distribution Timeline from futurist.se/gldt. It’s a truly nuts diagram of just how forked the Linux world has become. Totting up the currently live distros, Ubuntu is easily the most fertile with 70 forks. Debian and Red Hat have just over 60 each, and as for the total? We lost count after 280...

True, Ubuntu is a fork of Debian, but without the hard work of Canonical and its contributors I doubt those 70 distros would exist as forks of Debian. So I puzzle over the level of animosity that Canonical stirs in some sectors of the Linux community. The recent Debian debate on Systemd or Upstart generated a lot of noise against Upstart, but why would Canonical do anything but put Upstart forward as its primary choice? Why hate a company for putting its own developed project first?

Certainly, Canonical does make some odd decisions, but then many large companies do. Internal politics, lawyers, and the personal preferences of charismatic owners can sway decisions that look odd from the outside. That’s why this issue we’re going to fix Ubuntu. It’s the ideal time, too: the latest long term support release, 14.04 Trusty Tahr, is out, and you’ve likely installed it. So now’s the time to put right all those things that annoy you about Ubuntu. You can get started right now with this issue!

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Ubuntu Touch Finally Gets Beautiful Dialer and Contacts Apps

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu for phones is becoming more stable and new applications arrive every day, but some of the older core apps, like the Dialer and Contacts, remained a little behind the general design. That has changed now, as the Dialer is using the folded background concept and the Contacts entry has been improved.

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What other people are saying about Lubuntu 14.04

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Personally I think Lubuntu is great, especially for low end computers short of RAM. Lubuntu lends itself perfectly to netbooks and I wrote an article when Lubuntu 13.10 was released explaining why.

Shortly I will be showing how to try Lubuntu out without messing up your current Windows XP installation. Before I do though I thought I would list a few alternative reviews so that you can get a fully balanced opinion.

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openSUSE 13.1 vs Ubuntu 13.10: a friendly match

Filed under
SUSE
Ubuntu

Ubuntu is one of the most popular GNU/Linux-based operating system, along with Linux Mint. Ubuntu started off as a great operating system which, with the help of LUGs and communities, became extremely popular.

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Linux 3.16 Won't Land On Ubuntu 14.10 Quite Yet

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Developers are planning for Linux 3.16 to be the kernel of Ubuntu 14.10 but they're holding off on shipping any early release candidates to testers currently on Ubuntu 14.10, the Utopic Unicorn.

Today's Ubuntu kernel team meeting minutes note, "We have rebased our Utopic kernel to v3.15 final and uploaded (3.15.0-6.11). As noted in previous meetings, we are planning on converging on the v3.16 kernel for Utopic. We have started tracking v3.16-rc1 in our 'unstable' ubuntu-utopic branch. We’ll let this marinate and bake for a bit before we do an official v3.16 based upload to the archive."

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Licensing: Facebook Responds to Licence Complaints, Cloud Native Open Source License Choices Analysed

  • Facebook relicenses several projects
    Facebook has announced that the React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js projects will be moving to the MIT license. This is, of course, a somewhat delayed reaction to the controversy over the "BSD+patent" license previously applied to those projects.
  • Relicensing React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js
    Next week, we are going to relicense our open source projects React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js under the MIT license. We're relicensing these projects because React is the foundation of a broad ecosystem of open source software for the web, and we don't want to hold back forward progress for nontechnical reasons. This decision comes after several weeks of disappointment and uncertainty for our community. Although we still believe our BSD + Patents license provides some benefits to users of our projects, we acknowledge that we failed to decisively convince this community.
  • Cloud Native Open Source License Choices
    One of the most common questions regarding open source licensing today concerns trajectories. Specifically, what are the current directions of travel both for specific licenses as well as license types more broadly. Or put more simply, what licenses are projects using today, and how is that changing? We’ve examined this data several times, most recently in this January look at the state of licensing based on Black Duck’s dataset. That data suggested major growth for permissive licenses, primarily at the expense of reciprocal alternatives. The Apache and MIT licenses, for example, were up 10% and 21% respectively, while the GPL was down 27%. All of this is on a relative share basis, of course: the “drop” doesn’t reflect relicensing of existing projects, but less usage relative to its peers. [...] One such community with enough of a sample size to be relevant is the one currently forming around the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. Founded in 2015 with the Kubernetes project as its first asset, the Foundation has added eleven more open source projects, all of which are licensed under the same Apache 2 license. But as a successful Foundation is only a part of the broader ecosystem, the real question is what are the licensing preferences of the Cloud Native projects and products outside of the CNCF itself. [...] Unsurprisingly, perhaps, given the influence of the CNCF itself, Apache strongly outperforms all other licenses, showing far greater relative adoption than it has in more generalized datasets such as the Black Duck survey. Overall in this dataset, approximately 64% of projects are covered by the Apache license. No other project has greater than a 12% share. The only other licenses above 10%, in fact, are the GPL at 12% and MIT at 11%. After that, the other projects are all 5% or less.

today's howtos

Games: Half-Life: C.A.G.E.D., Arcan 0.5.3, Wine Staging 2.17

  • Half-Life: C.A.G.E.D. from former Valve worker should hopefully come to Linux
    Half-Life: C.A.G.E.D. [Steam] is a mod from former Valve worker Cayle George, it's a short prison escape and it should be coming to Linux. Mr George actually worked on Team Fortress 2 and Portal 2 during his time at Valve, but he's also worked for other notable developers on titles like Horizon Zero Dawn.
  • Game Engine Powered Arcan Display Server With Durden Desktop Updated
    Arcan, the open-source display server powered by a game engine, is out with a new release. Its Durden desktop environment has also been updated. Arcan is a display server built off "the corpse of a game engine" and also integrates a multimedia framework and offers behavior controls via Lua. Arcan has been in development for a half-decade while its original code traces back more than a decade, as explained previously and has continued advancing since.
  • Arcan 0.5.3, Durden 0.3
    It’s just about time for a new release of Arcan, and way past due for a new release of the reference desktop environment, Durden. Going through some of the visible changes on a ‘one-clip or screenshot per feature’ basis:
  • Razer plans to release a mobile gaming and entertainment device soon
    NVIDIA, another big player in the gaming hardware and lifestyle space, released an Android-based portable gaming and entertainment console called the NVIDIA Shield that emphasized in-home streaming, and the Ouya console that Razer acquired (and discontinued) ran Android. But Razer decided to use Windows instead of Android on the Edge.
  • Wine Staging 2.17 is out with more Direct3D11 features fixing issues in The Witcher 3, Overwatch and more
    Wine Staging 2.17 is another exciting release, which includes more Direct3D11 features which fixes issues with The Witcher 3, Overwatch and more. As a reminder, Wine Staging is the testing area for future Wine development released, which will eventually be made into stable Wine releases.

KDE: Plasma 5.11 in Kubuntu 17.10, Krita 3.3, Randa and Evolution of Plasma Mobile

  • KDE Plasma 5.11 Desktop Will Be Coming to Kubuntu 17.10 Soon After Its Release
    KDE kicked off the development of the KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment a few months ago, and they've already published the Beta release, allowing users to get a first glimpse of what's coming in the final release next month. Canonical's Ubuntu Desktop team did a great job bringing the latest GNOME 3.26 desktop environment to the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, and it looks like the Kubuntu team also want to rebase the official flavor on the forthcoming KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment.
  • Krita 3.3 Digital Painting App Promises Better HiDPI Support on Linux & Windows
    Work on the next Krita 3.x point release has started, and a first Release Candidate (RC) milestone of the upcoming Krita 3.3 version is now ready for public testing, giving us a glimpse of what's coming in the new release. In the release announcement, Krita devs reveal the fact that they were forced to bump the version number from 3.2.x to 3.3.x because the upcoming Krita 3.3 release will be introducing some important changes for Windows platforms, such as support for the Windows 8 event API, thus supporting the n-trig pen in Surface laptops.
  • Randa-progress post-hoc
    So, back in Randa I was splitting my energies and attentions in many pieces. Some attention went to making pancakes and running the kitchen in the morning — which is stuff I take credit for, but it is really Grace, and Scarlett, and Thomas who did the heavy lifting, and Christian and Mario who make sure the whole thing can happen. And the attendees of the Randa meeting who pitch in for the dishes after lunch and dinner. The Randa meetings are more like a campground than a 5-star hotel, and we work together to make the experience enjoyable. So thanks to everyone who pitched in. Part of a good sprint is keeping the attendees healthy and attentive — otherwise those 16-hour hacking days really get to you, in spite of the fresh Swiss air. [...] You can read more of what the attendees in Randa achieved on planet KDE (e.g. kdenlive, snappy, kmymoney, marble, kube, Plasma mobile, kdepim, and kwin). I’d like to give a special shout out to Manuel, who taught me one gesture in Italian Sign Langauage — which is different from American or Dutch Sign Language, reminding me that there’s localization everywhere.
  • The Evolution of Plasma Mobile
    Back around 2006, when the Plasma project was started by Aaron Seigo and a group of brave hackers (among which, yours truly) we wanted to create a user interface that is future-proof. We didn’t want to create something that would only run on desktop devices (or laptops), but a code-base that grows with us into whatever the future would bring. Mobile devices were already getting more powerful, but would usually run entirely different software than desktop devices. We wondered why. The Linux kernel served as a wonderful example. Linux runs on a wide range of devices, from super computers to embedded systems, you would set it up for the target system and it would run largely without code changes. Linux architecture is in fact convergent. Could we do something similar at the user interface level?