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Ubuntu

IFC6410 Pico-ITX Development Board Now Supports Fedora And Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat
Ubuntu

Makers, hobbyists and developers looking for a new Linux Fedora or Ubuntu development board for their projects might be interested to learn that the IFC6410 Pico-ITX board which is available to purchase for around $149.

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Mir Gains Support For "Trusted Prompt Sessions"

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Ubuntu

According to the Ubuntu Wiki, this feature comes down to "the main purpose of a trusted prompt session (TPS) then is to tie together the [application requesting access to a resource via a trusted helper, the trusted helper, and a trust prompt provider] components mentioned before, both in terms of presenting the final prompt to the user and in terms of lifecycle/focus mgmt. (from a shell's perspective). In this respect, a temporary, virtual app is introduced that spans across all three components."

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5 reasons why you should switch from Windows XP to Lubuntu

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Windows XP is dead. Some people may not be aware of this fact but I'm telling you now "That parrot is dead".

Microsoft ended support for Windows XP on April 8th 2014 but what does end of support mean? Does it mean it doesn't work anymore?

Actually, Windows XP will continue to work perfectly well for quite some time but the trouble is that any remaining security holes will remain unplugged and that leaves a huge opportunity for the cyber criminals to exploit any individual or organisation that remains on that platform.

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Also: Announcing Lubuntu Week

There are over 10,000 people using Ubuntu Phone OS!

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical developer Michael Hall says that there are over 10,000 unique users running Ubuntu phone OS on their devices. Where did this number come from? Did they tracked the number of download? No, that would be too vague to conclude how many users are actually using the mobile OS.

Ubuntu Phone users have to log into their Ubuntu One account (U1 file storage and music was discontinued this year), so that they can get updates or manage applications, just the way it works with Android, iOS or Windows 8. This gives Canonical the ability to know how many users used their U1 account to connect to the store and that’s where these numbers are coming from.

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Is Ubuntu's Unity Really All That Bad Nowadays?

Filed under
Ubuntu

Now, don't get me wrong - when it comes to choice of desktop interface it's a very subjective matter and often a matter of taste and what you, as the user, finds most comfortable and/or productive. Still, browse through various forums, comment sections or blogs across the internet concerning Unity or even Linux desktops in general and you'll still likely find plenty of negativity towards Canonical's flagship desktop offering. However, I do believe some of the common criticisms leveled at Unity are based on some of the early incarnations of that desktop. Is it really so bad nowadays?
Of course, amongst all the perceived 'hate' and general negativity for Unity, there are also users with positive reactions who either are new to Unity and find it to be a good, stable and easy to use desktop or they are users who once disliked Unity based on it's earlier versions but since trying out the Unity of today (say, Unity as it stands in Ubuntu 14.04) have had a change of heart.

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What To Expect From The First Ubuntu Smart Devices?

Filed under
Ubuntu
Gadgets

After testing the developer’s build of Ubuntu Touch smartphone OS in 2013, the company behind Ubuntu Linux (Canonical) has finally confirmed that it will soon release its first batch of entry-level smartphones running the open-source operating system later this year. The company has teamed up with Meizu and Bq to be its initial Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs). As compared to the open source Firefox OS released last year in consortium with Alacatel, the mobile edition of Ubuntu is not an HTML 5 or browser-based ecosystem. Similar to Android, it loads native Ubuntu applications (messaging, phone, and camera) flawlessly, even with the absence of wireless connectivity.

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Mark Shuttleworth Says Mir Will Have First Class Support from NVIDIA and AMD

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

Ever since the Mir announcement made by Canonical last year, the community has met the decision with some resistance. The Ubuntu developers have explained on numerous occasions why they chose this path for their systems and it all has to do with control.

Canonical is expanding its reach into the mobile and tablet world, but it's not that easy to build something from the ground up, especially when you don't control some of the most important aspects of it, and the display server is a very important part.

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Ubuntu to rely on existing fan base before wider launch

Filed under
Ubuntu

Creating a base of user advocates from existing “fans” of Meizu and Ubuntu will be key to driving the early success of Ubuntu in the mobile market, Cristian Parrino, VP of mobile and online services for Canonical, told Mobile Asia Daily.

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Ubuntu AIO DVD Features All Major Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Flavors and UEFI Support

Filed under
Ubuntu

We wrote a while back about this interesting collection of Ubuntu operating systems from the 14.04 LTS release and numerous users expressed their interest in downloading and trying Ubuntu AIO DVD.

There was a problem though. Users couldn't get it to work on systems that have UEFI, which turned out to be quite annoying. Fortunately, this problem has been fixed now and users can now employ this DVD on systems that have UEFI on the motherboard.

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Booting Ubuntu With Systemd Went Surprisingly Well

Filed under
Ubuntu

When booting up the Ubuntu 14.10 latest image with systemd 204, the system (to some surprise) booted fine and I encountered no immediate issues. The laptop has been running fine since today and was pleased it was a trouble-free experience. Coming up soon I'll run some boot speed tests, etc. Still though it's worth reiterating that it's not yet clear when systemd will become the default on Ubuntu Linux, just sometime before the 16.04 LTS release.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Blockchain Moves Beyond its 'Moonshot' Phase
  • Some reading
    I've complained previously about disliking benchmarking. More generally, I'm not really a fan of performance analysis. I always feel like I get stuck at coming up with an approach to "it's going slower, why" beyond the basics. I watched a video of Brendan Gregg's talk from kernel recipes, and ended up going down the black hole1 of reading his well written blog. He does a fantastic job of explaining performance analysis concepts as well as the practical tools to do the analysis. He wrote a book several years ago and I happily ordered it. The book explains how to apply the USE method to performance problems across the system. This was helpful to me because it provides a way to generate a list of things to check and how to check them. It addresses the "stuck" feeling I get when dealing with performance problems. The book also provides a good high level overview of operating systems concepts. I'm always looking for references for people who are interested in kernels but don't know where to start and I think this book could fill a certain niche. Even if this book has been out for several years now, I was very excited to discover it.
  • Introducing container-diff, a tool for quickly comparing container images
    The Google Container Tools team originally built container-diff, a new project to help uncover differences between container images, to aid our own development with containers. We think it can be useful for anyone building containerized software, so we’re excited to release it as open source to the development community.
  • NATTT – A Modern Multi-Platform Time Conscious Tracker App
    It’s not that there aren’t already a lot of time tracker apps but my conscience wouldn’t let me sleep if I didn’t tell you about NATTT. So grab your cup of whatever you’re probably drinking as we delve into this app a little. NATTT is an acronym for “Not Another Time Tracking Tool”; a free and multi-platform app with which you can keep track of your work and how much you have spent at it.
  • Running Bitcoin node and ElectrumX server
  • todo.txt done
  • GNOME's Calendar & TODO Applications Are Looking Better For v3.28
    Adding to the growing list of changes for GNOME 3.28 are improvements to the Calendar and To Do applications by Georges Stavracas. Stavracas has been reworking the month view of GNOME Calendar and it's looking much better, some applications for Calendar via libdazzle, and more.
  • Compact DAQ systems offer a choice of 12- or 16-bit I/Os
    Advantech’s Linux-ready “MIC-1810” and “MIC-1816” DAQ computers offer 12- and 16-bit analog I/O, respectively, plus 24x DIOs, Intel CPUs, and 4x USB ports. Advantech’s MIC-1810 and MIC-1816 are digital acquisition computers that run Linux or Windows 7/8/10 on Intel 3rd Gen “Ivy Bridge” processors. If the aging CPU is a turn-off, keep in mind that many DAQ applications don’t require that much processing power, and perhaps Advantech’s “entry-level” label for the systems extends to the price, as well. The 165 x 130 x 59mm, DIN-rail mountable systems should also prove useful for environments with limited space.

Security: New Release of HardenedBSD, Windows Leaks Details of Windows Back Doors

  • Stable release: HardenedBSD-stable 11-STABLE v1100054
  • Kaspersky blames NSA hack on infected Microsoft software
    Embattled computer security firm Kaspersky Lab said Thursday that malware-infected Microsoft Office software and not its own was to blame for the hacking theft of top-secret US intelligence materials. Adding tantalizing new details to the cyber-espionage mystery that has rocked the US intelligence community, Kaspersky also said there was a China link to the hack.
  • Investigation Report for the September 2014 Equation malware detection incident in the US
    In early October, a story was published by the Wall Street Journal alleging Kaspersky Lab software was used to siphon classified data from an NSA employee’s home computer system. Given that Kaspersky Lab has been at the forefront of fighting cyberespionage and cybercriminal activities on the Internet for over 20 years now, these allegations were treated very seriously. To assist any independent investigators and all the people who have been asking us questions whether those allegations were true, we decided to conduct an internal investigation to attempt to answer a few questions we had related to the article and some others that followed it:
  • Kaspersky: Clumsy NSA leak snoop's PC was packed with malware
    Kaspersky Lab, the US government's least favorite computer security outfit, has published its full technical report into claims Russian intelligence used its antivirus tools to steal NSA secrets. Last month, anonymous sources alleged that in 2015, an NSA engineer took home a big bunch of the agency's cyber-weapons to work on them on his home Windows PC, which was running the Russian biz's antimalware software – kind of a compliment when you think about it. The classified exploit code and associated documents on the personal system were then slurped by Kremlin spies via his copy of Kaspersky antivirus, it was claimed.

OSS Leftovers

  • Open Source Networking Days: Think Globally, Collaborate Locally
    Something that we’ve learned at The Linux Foundation over the years is that there is just no substitute for periodic, in-person, face-to-face collaboration around the open source technologies that are rapidly changing our world. It’s no different for the open networking projects I work with as end users and their ecosystem partners grapple with the challenges and opportunities of unifying various open source components and finding solutions to accelerate network transformation. This fall, we decided to take The Linux Foundation networking projects (OpenDaylight, ONAP, OPNFV, and others) on the road to Europe and Japan by working with local site hosts and network operators to host Open Source Networking Days in Paris, Milan, Stockholm, London, Tel Aviv, and Yokohama.
  • The Open-Source Driving Simulator That Trains Autonomous Vehicles
    Self-driving cars are set to revolutionize transport systems the world over. If the hype is to be believed, entirely autonomous vehicles are about to hit the open road. The truth is more complex. The most advanced self-driving technologies work only in an extremely limited set of environments and weather conditions. And while most new cars will have some form of driver assistance in the coming years, autonomous cars that drive in all conditions without human oversight are still many years away. One of the main problems is that it is hard to train vehicles to cope in all situations. And the most challenging situations are often the rarest. There is a huge variety of tricky circumstances that drivers rarely come across: a child running into the road, a vehicle driving on the wrong side of the street, an accident immediately ahead, and so on.
  • Fun with Le Potato
    At Linux Plumbers, I ended up with a Le Potato SBC. I hadn't really had time to actually boot it up until now. They support a couple of distributions which seem to work fine if you flash them on. I mostly like SBCs for having actual hardware to test on so my interest tends to be how easily can I get my own kernel running. Most of the support is not upstream right now but it's headed there. The good folks at BayLibre have been working on getting the kernel support upstream and have a tree available for use until then.
  • PyConf Hyderabad 2017
    In the beginning of October, I attended a new PyCon in India, PyConf Hyderabad (no worries, they are working on the name for the next year). I was super excited about this conference, the main reason is being able to meet more Python developers from India. We are a large country, and we certainly need more local conferences :)
  • First Basilisk version released!
    This is the first public version of the Basilisk web browser, building on the new platform in development: UXP (code-named Möbius).
  • Pale Moon Project Rolls Out The Basilisk Browser Project
    The developers behind the Pale Moon web-browser that's been a long standing fork of Firefox have rolled out their first public beta release of their new "Basilisk" browser technology. Basilisk is their new development platform based on their (Gecko-forked) Goanna layout engine and the Unified UXL Platform (UXP) that is a fork of the Mozilla code-base pre-Servo/Rust... Basically for those not liking the direction of Firefox with v57 rolling out the Quantum changes, etc.
  • Best word processor for Mac [iophk: "whole article fails to mention OpenDocument Format"]
  • WordPress 4.9: This one's for you, developers!
    WordPress 4.9 has debuted, and this time the world's most popular content management system has given developers plenty to like. Some of the changes are arguably overdue: syntax highlighting and error checking for CSS editing and cutting custom HTML are neither scarce nor innovative. They'll be welcomed arrival will likely be welcomed anyway, as will newly-granular roles and permissions for developers. The new release has also added version 4.2.6 of MediaElement.js, an upgrade that WordPress.org's release notes stated has removed dependency on jQuery, improves accessibility, modernizes the UI, and fixes many bugs.”
  • New projects on Hosted Weblate
  • Cilk Plus Is Being Dropped From GCC
    Intel deprecated Cilk Plus multi-threading support with GCC 7 and now for GCC 8 they are looking to abandon this support entirely. Cilk Plus only had full support introduced in GCC 5 while now for the GCC 8 release early next year it's looking like it will be dropped entirely.
  • Software Freedom Law Center vs. Software Freedom Conservancy

    On November 3rd, the Software Freedom Conservancy (SFC) wrote a blog post to let people know that the Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC) had begun legal action against them (the SFC) over the trademark for their name.

  • What Is Teletype For Atom? How To Code With Fellow Developers In Real Time?
    In a short period of three years, GitHub’s open source code editor has become one of the most popular options around. In our list of top text editors for Linux, Atom was featured at #2. From time to time, GitHub keeps adding new features to this tool to make it even better. Just recently, with the help of Facebook, GitHub turned Atom into a full-fledged IDE. As GitHub is known to host some of the world’s biggest open source collaborative projects, it makes perfect sense to add the collaborative coding ability to Atom. To make this possible, “Teletype for Atom” has just been announced.
  • Microsoft Is Trying To Make Windows Subsystem For Linux Faster (WSL)
  • Microsoft and GitHub team up to take Git virtual file system to macOS, Linux

Ubuntu: New Users, Unity Remix, 18.04 LTS News

  • How to Get Started With the Ubuntu Linux Distro
    The Linux operating system has evolved from a niche audience to widespread popularity since its creation in the mid 1990s, and with good reason. Once upon a time, that installation process was a challenge, even for those who had plenty of experience with such tasks. The modern day Linux, however, has come a very long way. To that end, the installation of most Linux distributions is about as easy as installing an application. If you can install Microsoft Office or Adobe Photoshop, you can install Linux. Here, we’ll walk you through the process of installing Ubuntu Linux 17.04, which is widely considered one of the most user-friendly distributions. (A distribution is a variation of Linux, and there are hundreds and hundreds to choose from.)
  • An ‘Ubuntu Unity Remix’ Might Be on the Way…
    A new Ubuntu flavor that uses the Unity 7 desktop by default is under discussion. The plans have already won backing from a former Unity developer.
  • Ubuntu News: Get Firefox Quantum Update Now; Ubuntu 18.04 New Icon Theme Confirmed
    Earlier this week, Mozilla earned big praises in the tech world for launching its next-generation Firefox Quantum 57.0 web browser. The browser claims to be faster and better than market leader Google Chrome. Now, Firefox Quantum is available for all supported Ubuntu versions from the official repositories. The Firefox Quantum Update is also now available.
  • New Icon Theme Confirmed for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS
    ‘Suru’ is (apparently) going to be the default icon theme in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS. That’s Suru, the rebooted community icon theme and not Suru, the Canonical-created icon theme that shipped on the Ubuntu Phone (and was created by Matthieu James, who recently left Canonical).