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Ubuntu

13 New Photo Wallpapers Chosen for Ubuntu 12.04

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Ubuntu

omgubuntu.co.uk: From a pool of thousands, 13 photographic wallpapers have been chosen for inclusion in Ubuntu 12.04.

GNOME Classic in Ubuntu 12.04: It’s Like Nothing Ever Changed

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Ubuntu

omgubuntu.co.uk: Come April 26th and the release of Ubuntu 12.04 a vast number of Ubuntu users will be getting their first taste of the Unity desktop since its basic beginnings as the Ubuntu Netbook Remix in the last LTS.

Ubuntu Two Years After Leadership Change

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Moving Forward, Two Years After Leadership Change
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 257
  • An Open Letter to Ubuntu

What if Ubuntu were right?

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Ubuntu

ploum.net: Last week, I had the chance to have a nice chat with Jonathan Riddell, Canonical employee and Kubuntu maintainer.

Is Ubuntu becoming a big name in Linux servers?

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Ubuntu
  • Is Ubuntu becoming a big name in enterprise Linux servers?
  • Ubuntu 12.04 Development update
  • Ubuntu 12.04: A 'Coming of Age' on Servers Too, Shuttleworth Says
  • Top 10 Ubuntu app downloads for February
  • Red Hat falling behind Ubuntu in enterprise sector, Shuttleworth claims

Ubuntu User Survey: Who’s Behind the Curtain?

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Ubuntu

thevarguy.com: Who runs Ubuntu? Where, why and how? That’s a question lots of people — including probably even Canonical employees — would like to be able to answer better. Toward this end, a survey of general Ubuntu users is underway.

Why I Switched From Ubuntu To openSUSE

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SUSE
Ubuntu

muktware.com: I have been using openSUSE for a few months now. I assume its been 3 months since I switched to openSUSE. I played with Gnome 3 Shell for a while and loved it. There is no doubt that openSUSE offers a great Gnome Shell experience. However, everything changed when I bought my second monitor and gave KDE a try.

Has Canonical Found the Keys to the Computing Kingdom?

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Ubuntu

linuxinsider.com (blog safari): There seems to be no end in sight to the bold moves and bold proclamations surrounding Ubuntu Linux these days.

An appeal to reason

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Ubuntu

larrythefreesoftwareguy: Rather than put you through an eye-rolling, arm-waving rant on this screen about how The Mark’s vision of reality differs from — well — reality (to say nothing of his uncanny knack for hyperbole and a penchant for exaggeration, followed by responses to criticism that redefine ad hominem), I’m just going to appeal to reason and let the reader decide.

Watching the Future of Canonical

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Ubuntu

linux-magazine.com: Is it just me, or is there a whiff of desperation these days around Canonical, Ubuntu's commercial arm?

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Licensing resource series: Free GNU/Linux distributions & GNU Bucks

When Richard Stallman set out to create the GNU Project, the goal was to create a fully free operating system. Over 33 years later, it is now possible for users to have a computer that runs only free software. But even if all the software is available, putting it all together yourself, or finding a distribution that comes with only free software, would be quite the task. That is why we provide a list of Free GNU/Linux distributions. Each distro on the list is commited to only distributing free software. With many to choose from, you can find a distro that meets your needs while respecting your freedom. But with so much software making up an entire operating system, how is it possible to make sure that nothing nasty sneaks into the distro? That's where you, and GNU Bucks come in. Read more

Linux 4.7.6

I'm announcing the release of the 4.7.6 kernel. All users of the 4.7 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.7.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.7.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st... Read more Also: Linux 4.4.23

Linaro beams LITE at Internet of Things devices

Linaro launched a “Linaro IoT and Embedded” (LITE) group, to develop end-to-end open source reference software for IoT devices and applications. Linaro, which is owned by ARM and major ARM licensees, and which develops open source software for ARM devices, launched a Linaro IoT and Embedded (LITE) Segment Group at this week’s Linaro Connect event in Las Vegas. The objective of the LITE initiative is to produce “end to end open source reference software for more secure connected products, ranging from sensors and connected controllers to smart devices and gateways, for the industrial and consumer markets,” says Linaro. Read more Also:

  • Linaro organisation, with ARM, aims for end-end open source IoT code
    With the objective of producing reference software for more secure connected products, ranging from sensors and connected controllers to smart devices and gateways, for the industrial and consumer markets, Linaro has announced LITE: Collaborative Software Engineering for the Internet of Things (IoT). Linaro and the LITE members will work to reduce fragmentation in operating systems, middleware and cloud connectivity solutions, and will deliver open source device reference platforms to enable faster time to market, improved security and lower maintenance costs for connected products. Industry interoperability of diverse, connected and secure IoT devices is a critical need to deliver on the promise of the IoT market, the organisation says. “Today, product vendors are faced with a proliferation of choices for IoT device operating systems, security infrastructure, identification, communication, device management and cloud interfaces.”
  • An open source approach to securing The Internet of Things
  • Addressing the IoT Security Problem
    Last week's DDOS takedown of security guru Brian Krebs' website made history on several levels. For one, it was the largest such reported attack ever, with unwanted traffic to the site hitting levels of 620 Gbps, more than double the previous record set back in 2013, and signalling that the terabyte threshold will certainly be crossed soon. It also relied primarily on compromised Internet of Things devices.