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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 14.04.5 LTS Is the Last in the Series, Brings Xenial Xerus' Linux Kernel

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Ubuntu

Canonical, through Adam Conrad, announced the release of the last maintenance update to the Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating system series, version 14.04.5.

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Also: Lubuntu 14.04.5 LTS Arrives with Refreshed Hardware Support, Many Updates

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

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Debian
Ubuntu

  • GCC 6 Is Now The Default In Debian Unstable

    GCC 6.1.1 is now the default compiler for Debian unstable as the developers work to get this major GNU Compiler Collection update ready for the next Debian release.

    There still are some Debian packages breaking under GCC6, but the switch has been made now to motivate developers to getting the remaining issues addressed in time for the next Debian release. With plenty of time left, Debian Stretch will be ready for GCC6 instead of last year's GCC 5.

  • This is Why the ‘Snap Find’ Command No Longer Works on Ubuntu

    You’re reading this post because you’re confused. Confused as to why running this command: sudo snap find now returns this error: error : cannot list snaps: empty query on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS instead of a list of Snap packages available to install.

  • Ubuntu 14.04.5 Released, This Is What’s New

    The 5th and final point release of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS is now available to download. Ubuntu 14.04.5 LTS delvers a new hardware enablement stack compromised of the Ubuntu Linux Kernel 4.4 and X graphics stack derived from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

  • Linux Mint 18 ‘Sarah’ Xfce Edition Released — Download Now

    The Linux Mint Team has announced the release of Linux Mint 18 ‘Sarah’ Xfce edition.

Canonical Plans to Unify and Clean Up Networking Configuration in Ubuntu Linux

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Ubuntu

Canonical, though Martin Pitt, the systemd maintainer for the Ubuntu Linux operating system, announced recently plans to unify and clean up the networking configuration in Ubuntu via a new project called "netplan."

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Ubuntu 16.10 to Soon Get Linux Kernel 4.6.5, Will Be Powered by Linux Kernel 4.8

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Ubuntu

The upcoming Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) operating system is currently in development, with a second Alpha build seeded to public testers at the end of July 2016.

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Ubuntu Snappy Core Now Officially Available for uCRobotics’ Bubblegum-96 Board

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Ubuntu

Canonical, through April Wang, is pleased to announce that the Snappy Ubuntu Core operating system for embedded and IoT (Internet of Things) devices is now officially available for the Bubblegum-96 single-board computer (SBC).

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Exton|OS Light Now Based on Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS, but Powered by Linux Kernel 4.6

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OS
Ubuntu

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton has released a new version of his Ubuntu-based Exton|OS operating system, build 160728. The Exton|OS Light edition has been updated, which uses the Openbox window manager.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Fixing Debian bug #794266

    After finally being able to fix Debian bug #794266 I want to thank those who made this possible:

    Some time ago my colleague Bjørn offered an Arietta G25 to me. After Jochen, another colleague, helped me to solder pin headers on it, this machine served as host computer for my tests.

  • Amazon cloud: refreshing my skills. (100%)

    For a few years I did not attempt any serious task on the Amazon cloud. It took me a bit of time to get back my automatisms and adapt myself to the changes. In particular, the cheapest instances, t2.nano, are only accessible via virtual private clouds (VPC), and it was a bit difficult for me to find how to create a simple one. Perhaps this is because all AWS accounts created after March 18, 2013, automatically have a default VPC, and everybody else who needed their own simple VPC have created it a long time ago already. In the end, this was not complicated at all. This is probably why I could not find a tutorial.

  • Debian And TOR Services Now Available Using “Dark” .Onion Address

    The Tor project and the Debian project have teamed to provide Debian services and repositories over the Tor network. Debian has announced the existence of few such services in a blog post.

  • Hedera is a New Linux Icon Theme Inspired By a Very Old One…

    Hedera is a new Linux icon pack inspired by the past. Specifically, the Tango project.

  • Ubuntu 16.10 To Ship with Nautilus 3.20

    Nautilus 3.20, and a host of GNOME 3.20 apps, will ship by default in Ubuntu 16.10 'Yakkety Yak', with new versions already available for testing.

  • Linux Mint 18 Xfce Edition Released

Ubuntu Leftovers

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Ubuntu
  • So Far Ubuntu Phone Hasn't Tempted Me, But Would Highly Consider A Tizen Device

    With writing this weekend about switching to an S7 Edge powered by Android as my primary smartphone, it generated a flurry of comments in the forums and elsewhere with people wanting to share their two cents.

  • Win an Ubuntu Linux laptop in the System76 'Pop Quiz' giveaway

    The upcoming school year is quickly approaching, meaning many parents and students are busy shopping. While some kids still need old-school things like pens and paper, the really fun thing to buy is a new laptop.

    Understandably, money is tight for many folks, meaning a quality computer might not be in the budget. Luckily, System76 is giving away one of its most popular Linux-based laptops -- the Lemur. The pre-installed Ubuntu operating system is absolutely brilliant for education, making it a sweet prize for the winner. If you are interested in entering, you can find out the details below.

  • Beautiful Arc GTK Theme Now Available in the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) Repos

    It would appear that the popular and beautiful Arc GTK Theme created by Horst3180 has finally landed in the software repositories of the Ubuntu Linux operating system.

BQ's Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition is an underwhelming tablet [Review]

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Reviews
Ubuntu

The Aquaris M10 is very much a first attempt for BQ and you would expect future iterations to have some significant improvements. It’s also hard to find compelling reasons why iOS or Android fans would want to switch over to an Ubuntu tablet, but those familiar with the operating system should be excited to finally have their needs met in the tablet market.

One positive factor is that switching between tablet and desktop mode works very well for the most part, so can definitely fulfill professional needs as much as casual ones. This could be a viable option for someone who wants that flexibility and isn’t too fussed about some of the more superficial features.

Aspects such as the cameras, display and build quality could all be improved, but are about right for the price point in this unspectacular but solid device.

With the HD version costing €229.90 (£187) and the full HD tablet coming in at €279.90 (£227), the M10 offers decent value for money and provides a solid platform for BQ to build on in the future.

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Security News

  • Jay Beale: Linux Security and Remembering Bastille Linux
    Security expert and co-creator of the Linux-hardening (and now Unix-hardening) project Bastille Linux. That’s Jay Beale. He’s been working with Linux, and specifically on security, since the late 1980s. The greatest threat to Linux these days? According to Beale, the thing you really need to watch out for is your Android phone, which your handset manufacturer and wireless carrier may or may not be good about updating with the latest security patches. Even worse? Applications you get outside of the controlled Google Play and Amazon environments, where who-knows-what malware may lurk. On your regular desktop or laptop Linux installation, Beale says the best security precaution you can take is encrypting your hard drive — which isn’t at all hard to do. He and I also talked a bit, toward the end, about how “the Linux community” was so tiny, once upon a time, that it wasn’t hard to know most of its major players. He also has some words of encouragement for those of you who are new to Linux and possibly a bit confused now and then. We were all new and confused once upon a time, and got less confused as we learned. Guess what? You can learn, too, and you never know where that knowledge can take you.
  • Automotive security: How safe is a next-generation car?
    The vehicles we drive are becoming increasingly connected through a variety of technologies. Features such as keyless entry and self-diagnostics are becoming commonplace. Unfortunately, they can also introduce IT security issues.
  • Let's Encrypt: Every Server on the Internet Should Have a Certificate
    The web is not secure. As of August 2016, only 45.5 percent of Firefox page loads are HTTPS, according to Josh Aas, co-founder and executive director of Internet Security Research Group. This number should be 100 percent, he said in his talk called “Let’s Encrypt: A Free, Automated, and Open Certificate Authority” at LinuxCon North America. Why is HTTPS so important? Because without security, users are not in control of their data and unencrypted traffic can be modified. The web is wonderfully complex and, Aas said, it’s a fool’s errand to try to protect this certain thing or that. Instead, we need to protect everything. That’s why, in the summer of 2012, Aas and his friend and co-worker Eric Rescorla decided to address the problem and began working on what would become the Let’s Encrypt project.
  • OpenSSL 1.1 Released With Many Changes
    OpenSSL 1.1.0 was released today as a major update to this free software cryptography and SSL/TLS toolkit. In addition to OpenSSL 1.1 rolling out a new build system and new security levels and support for pipelining and a new threading API, security additions to OpenSSL 1.1 include adding the AFALG engine, support for ChaChao20 in libcrypto/libssl, scrypto algorithm support, and support for X25519, among many other additions.
  • Is Windows ​10’s ‘Hidden Administrator Account’ a security risk? [Ed: Damage control from Microsoft Jack (Jack Schofield) because Microsoft Windows is vulnerable by design]