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Ubuntu

Ubuntu in Cloud Foundry

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Linux to be bundled as preferred OS with Pivotal Cloud Foundry app platform

    Canonical and Cloud Foundry developer Pivotal have agreed a partnership in which Canonical's Ubuntu Linux will become the preferred operating system for running Cloud Foundry, with secure certified Ubuntu images included.

    Cloud Foundry is one of the most popular platform-as-a-service suites for developing and deploying cloud-native applications, and versions of it are integrated in a number of platforms such as IBM's Bluemix developer cloud and HPE's Helion Stackato.

  • Pivotal Adds Ubuntu to Cloud Foundry

    The steady shift to cloud native infrastructure continues with a partnership between enterprise software vendor Pivotal and Linux specialist Canonical that will provide secure images from Canonical's Linux distribution Ubuntu on the Pivotal Cloud Foundry.

Review: Ubuntu Server 16.04 LTS shines

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) represents the first release from Canonical to deliver long-term support since 2011 (version 14). While the latest improvements may not be entirely revolutionary, Ubuntu 16.04 rounds up exciting features to fortify the server base and enhance the desktop experience. InfoWorld reviewed the new desktop release in April. In this review, I’ll focus on the server.

One of the key updates in this release comes by way of the new Snap package archive. Canonical’s LTS repositories are notoriously outpaced by modern software release cycles. It’s the classic trade-off for stability: Canonical moves slowly to adopt new versions of packages in order to vet applications and ensure they don’t muck up your system. Unfortunately, that induces a lag time that leaves users waiting as the latest and greatest software passes them by.

Read more [paywall]

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Canonical Announces Snappy Sprint Event in Germany to Shape Up Universal Snaps

    Today, July 5, Canonical's David Planella has informed Softpedia about an upcoming event that aims to gather together developers and contributors from various well-known projects to work on shaping up the universal Snaps.

    Last month, Canonical informed the media about Snaps becoming universal binary format for various GNU/Linux distributions that decide to adopt it in addition to various other similar formats, such as Flatpak or AppImage.

    Snaps are currently enabled by default in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, but Canonical made it possible for users of various other operating systems, including, but not limited to, Arch Linux, Debian, and elementary OS, to use it as well.

  • Linux distros look to drop 32-bit support
  • Linux distros to ditch 32-bit support

Fairphone 2 and OnePlus One Ubuntu Phones Receive Bluetooth, Voice Call Support

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Ubuntu

Marius Gripsgård was happy to announce the biggest Ubports update ever for many of the unofficial Ubuntu Phone devices that he and other contributors to this project are maintaining.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu’s Snap Arrives on Arch’s Community Repo

    Ubuntu’s Snap package management system which was recently presented as a potential replacement for all the packages across all GNU/Linux systems sparked excitement as well as disapproval amongst Linux enthusiasts towards Canonical and their push of their Snappy format.

  • Linux letting go: 32-bit builds on the way out

    Major Linux distributions are in agreement: it's time to stop developing new versions for 32-bit processors.

    Simply: it's a waste of time, both to create the 32-bit port, and to keep 32-bit hardware around to test it on.

    At the end of June, Ubuntu developer Dimitri Ledkov chipped into the debate with this mailing list post, saying bluntly that 32-bit ports are a waste of resources.

  • Lumenera Corporation Announces the Release of Their ‘Lumenera Linux SDK 2.1’

    Lumenera, a leading manufacturer and developer of high performance digital cameras and custom imaging solutions, is pleased to announce the launch of Lumenera Linux SDK 2.1, their new software development kit designed for embedded platforms using Linux ARM based processors.

    Combining powerful features with reliable performance, the Lumenera Linux SDK 2.1 software maximizes the high-speed, high-resolution features of Lumenera’s USB 3.0 cameras. Lumenera chose to formally support Ubuntu Linux with their cameras as it is used by many development teams around the world because of its strong presence globally, versatility, reliability, and extensive developer libraries. Ubuntu has regular Long Term Support (LTS) releases that are supported for five years, making it an ideal choice for developers.

Ubuntu Touch OTA-13 to Introduce a New Power Manager for Ubuntu Phones, Tablets

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Ubuntu

We've been asked several times by some of our readers what's going on in the Ubuntu Touch world, the operating system that powers the Ubuntu Phone and Ubuntu Tablet devices.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

Snappy Moves in the Main Arch Linux Repo, snapd 2.0.10 Released to Fedora COPR

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Ubuntu

Today, July 4, 2016, Canonical's Zygmunt Krynicki has had the pleasure of announcing that the Snappy implementation for Ubuntu Linux has been updated to snapd 2.0.10.

snapd 2.0.10 comes two weeks after the release of the 2.0.9 version, which introduced full Snap confinement on the elementary OS 0.4 "Loki" operating system, among several other goodies. However, the most interesting part of today's announcement for snapd 2.0.10 is that it also landed for Fedora 24 users in the COPR repository.

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IBM's SoftLayer cloud gets certified Ubuntu Linux 16.04 LTS images

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Server
Ubuntu

IBM's SoftLayer cloud division is now offering certified images of Canonical's Ubuntu Linux server platform, providing customers with access to optimised images for running on SoftLayer's bare metal and virtual servers.

Canonical's Ubuntu is the most widely deployed Linux distribution for running web servers, and the most commonly used platform for organisations building and operating clouds based on the OpenStack framework.

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More in Tux Machines

systemd and DebConf16

  • systemd backport of v230 available for Debian/jessie
    At DebConf 16 I was working on a systemd backport for Debian/jessie. Results are officially available via the Debian archive now. In Debian jessie we have systemd v215 (which originally dates back to 2014-07-03 upstream-wise, plus changes + fixes from pkg-systemd folks of course). Now via Debian backports you have the option to update systemd to a very recent version: v230. If you have jessie-backports enabled it’s just an `apt install systemd -t jessie-backports` away. For the upstream changes between v215 and v230 see upstream’s NEWS file for list of changes. (Actually the systemd backport is available since 2016-07-19 for amd64, arm64 + armhf, though for mips, mipsel, powerpc, ppc64el + s390x we had to fight against GCC ICEs when compiling on/for Debian/jessie and for i386 architecture the systemd test-suite identified broken O_TMPFILE permission handling.)
  • DebConf16 low resolution videos
    If you go to the Debian video archive, you will notice the appearance of an "lq" directory in the debconf16 subdirectory of the archive. This directory contains low-resolution re-encodings of the same videos that are available in the toplevel.

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