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Ubuntu

Voyager 16.04.1 LTS Adds Intel Skylake Support, Based on Xubuntu 16.04.1 LTS

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Ubuntu

The guys over Voyager, a Xubuntu-based GNU/Linux distribution built around the lightweight Xfce desktop environment, have announced the release of Voyager 16.04.1 LTS.

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Debian and Ubuntu News

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian Project News - July 29th, 2016

    Welcome to this year's third issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community.

  • SteamOS Brewmaster 2.87 Released With NVIDIA Pascal Support
  • Snap interfaces for sandboxed applications

    Last week, we took a look at the initial release of the "portal" framework developed for Flatpak, the application-packaging format currently being developed in GNOME. For comparison, we will also explore the corresponding resource-control framework available in the Snap format developed in Ubuntu. The two packaging projects have broadly similar end goals, as many have observed, but they tend to vary quite a bit in the implementation details. Naturally, those differences are of particular importance to the intended audience: application developers.

    There is some common ground between the projects. Both use some combination of techniques (namespaces, control groups, seccomp filters, etc.) to restrict what a packaged application can do. Moreover, both implement a "deny by default" sandbox, then provide a supplemental means for applications to access certain useful system resources on a restricted or mediated basis. As we will see, there is also some overlap in what interfaces are offered, although the implementations differ.

    Snap has been available since 2014, so its sandboxing and resource-control implementations have already seen real-world usage. That said, the design of Snap originated in the Ubuntu Touch project aimed at smartphones, so some of its assumptions are undergoing revision as Snap comes to desktop systems.

    In the Snap framework, the interfaces that are defined to provide access to system resources are called, simply, "interfaces." As we will see, they cover similar territory to the recently unveiled "portals" for Flatpak, but there are some key distinctions.

    Two classes of Snap interfaces are defined: one for the standard resources expected to be of use to end-user applications, and one designed for use by system utilities. Snap packages using the standard interfaces can be installed with the snap command-line tool (which is the equivalent of apt for .deb packages). Packages using the advanced interfaces require a separate management tool.

  • Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) Reaches End Of Life Today (July 28)
  • Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Yakkety Yak Gets A Unity HUD-Like Searchable Menu

    MATE HUD, a Unity HUD-like tool that allows searching through an application's menu, was recently uploaded to the official Yakkety Yak repositories, and is available (but not enabled) by default in Ubuntu MATE 16.10.

Tablet review: BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition

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Ubuntu

As employees have become more and more flexible in recent years thanks to the power and performance of mobile devices, the way we work has changed dramatically.

We frequently chop and change between smartphones, tablets and laptops for different tasks, which has led to the growth of the hybrid market – devices such as Microsoft’s Surface Pro 3 and Apple’s iPad Pro – that provide the power and functionality of a laptop with the mobility and convenience of a tablet.

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Tablet review: BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition

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Reviews
Ubuntu

The Aquaris M10 is very much a first attempt for BQ and you would expect future iterations to have some significant improvements. It’s also hard to find compelling reasons why iOS or Android fans would want to switch over to an Ubuntu tablet, but those familiar with the operating system should be excited to finally have their needs met in the tablet market.

One positive factor is that switching between tablet and desktop mode works very well for the most part, so can definitely fulfill professional needs as much as casual ones. This could be a viable option for someone who wants that flexibility and isn’t too fussed about some of the more superficial features.

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Ubuntu Leftovers

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Ubuntu
  • Willing To Experience Linux? Try Ubuntu Demo Right Now In Your Browser

    If you are new to the world of Linux, you might not be knowing about online Ubuntu Linux demo website. If you are planning to make a switch to Linux, you can head over to this website and get familiar with Ubuntu Linux.

  • Ubuntu Touch takes a huge step towards Convergence in OTA-12

    Ubuntu has a very ambitious goal with Ubuntu Touch. It proposed an operating system that could work equally on any capable device, a smartphone that can truly be your computer, no holds barred. That was the promise of Convergence, which we took for a spin with the Meizu PRO 5 smartphone and, before that, the bq Aquaris M10 tablet. The results back then where disappointing yet promising. Ubuntu Touch, as it was when we reviewed these devices, still lacked that punch that would make you truly go "wow!". But, unlike other operating systems, Ubuntu is fast evolving, and the latest OTA-12 brings much needed improvements to bring us closer to true Convergence.

  • Yakkety Yak Alpha 2 Released
  • [Mint] Monthly News – July 2016

Chew on this: Ubuntu Core Linux comes to the uCRobotics Bubblegum-96 board

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Ubuntu

Linux and other open source software have been in the news quite a bit lately. As more and more people are seeing, closed source is not the only way to make money. A company like Red Hat, for instance, is able to be profitable while focusing its business on open source.

Ubuntu is one of the most popular Linux-based operating systems, and it is not hard to see why. Not only is it easy to use and adaptable to much hardware (such as SoC boards), but there is a ton of free support online from the Ubuntu user community too. Today, Canonical announces a special Ubuntu Core image for the uCRobotics Bubblegum-96 board.

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Facebook Open Sources 17-Camera Surround360 Rig with Ubuntu Stitching Software

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Ubuntu

The major benefit of the higher end cameras -- and the Surround360 in particular -- is not only quality and durability, but much shorter processing time stitching videos into a seamless whole. The open source Linux software “vastly reduces the typical 3D-360 processing time while maintaining the 8K-per-eye quality we think is optimal for the best VR viewing experience,” says Facebook.

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Ubuntu Releases and Alphas

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Touch OTA-13 Update to Rename the Libertine Scope to "Desktop Apps"

    Now that the Ubuntu Touch OTA-12 update has been successfully deployed to users' devices, it's time for Canonical's engineers behind the Ubuntu mobile OS to concentrate their efforts on the next milestone.

    Yes, that's right, we're talking about the OTA-13 update, which should arrive this fall with numerous new features, many improvements to existing components, as well as countless bug fixes. One feature that caught our attention is the rename of the Libertine Scope introduced in the OTA-12 release to "Desktop Apps."

  • Ubuntu 16.04.1 released

    Canonical has announced the first point release of the latest long-term support (LTS) version of Ubuntu, 16.04.

    Upgrade notifications will be sent to users still on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS.

    “The first point release for an LTS comes out 3 months after the initial release and then every 6 months until the next LTS is released,” said Canonical.

    “Upgrade notifications happen a short while later after some more QA testing.”

  • Ubuntu 16.10 "Yakkety Yak" Alpha 2 Arrives for Opt-in Flavors, Here's What's New
  • Ubuntu 16.10 Alpha 2 Is Available to Download Now
  • Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Alpha 2 Ships with New Unity-Like Heads-Up Display (HUD)

    Martin Wimpress informs Softpedia today, July 28, 2016, about the availability of the second Alpha 2 milestone towards the upcoming Ubuntu MATE 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) operating system.

    If you read our previous report on the availability of the Ubuntu 16.10 Alpha 2 development release of opt-in flavors, you would know already that only Lubuntu, Ubuntu Kylin, and Ubuntu MATE have announced their participation, and they all ship pretty much with the same GNU/Linux technologies under the hood.

  • Lubuntu 16.10 Alpha 2 Released with Linux Kernel 4.4 LTS, Latest LXDE Updates
  • LXLE "Eclectica" 16.04.1 Up to Release Candidate Stage, Based on Ubuntu 16.04.1

    The development of the LXLE 16.04.1 GNU/Linux distribution continues, and we're announcing today the availability of the Release Candidate (RC) builds for 64-bit and 32-bit systems.

    LXLE "Eclectica" 16.04.1 Release Candidate comes only two weeks after the release of the Beta version, which was seeded to public beta testers at the beginning of the month, but was only available for 64-bit PCs and it dind't include the goodies Canonical introduces with the first point release of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) OS.

  • Linux Mint 18 Xfce Is Just Around the Corner, KDE Edition Coming This September

    Today, July 28, 2016, Clement Lefebvre has published the monthly newsletter for the month of July to informs the community about the latest happening in the Linux Mint world.

    As you might know, a Beta version of the soon-to-be-released Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" Xfce edition has been made available last week, and Clement Lefebvre now informs us that the final release is expected to land very soon and that the upgrade path for Linux Mint 17.3 "Rosa" Xfce users will be open in the coming weeks.

Ubuntu Leftovers

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Ubuntu
  • Yakkety Yak Alpha 2 Released
  • Ubuntu 16.10 "Yakkety Yak" Alpha 2 Released

    Today marks the second alpha release for Ubuntu 16.10 "Yakkety Yak" flavors participating in these early development releases.

    Participating in today's Yakkety Yak Alpha 2 development milestone are Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, and Ubuntu Kylin. No Xubuntu or Kubuntu releases to report on this morning.

  • PSA: Ubuntu 15.10 Hits End of Life Today

    It's time to wave a weary goodbye to the Wily Werewolf, as Ubuntu 15.10 support ends today.

  • Jono Bacon on Life After (and Before) GitHub

    Do you want to know what it takes to be a professional community manager? This interview will show you the kind of personality that does well at it, and how Jono Bacon, one of the world’s finest community managers, discovered Linux and later found his way into community management.

    Bacon is world-famous as the long-time community manager for Ubuntu. He was so good, I sometimes think his mother sang “you’ll be a community manager by and by” to him when he was a baby. In 2014 he went to XPRIZE, not a FOSS company, but important nevertheless. From there he dove back into FOSS as community manager for GitHub.

    Now Bacon is a freelance, self-employed community manager. One of his major clients is HackerOne, whose CEO is Bacon’s and my mutual friend Mårten Mickos. But HackerOne is far from his only client. In the interview he says he recently got back from visiting a client in China, and that he has more work then he can handle.

Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) Reached End of Life, Upgrade to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

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Ubuntu

Today, July 28, 2016, was the last day when the Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) operating system received updates for the software available in the repositories, as well as security fixes.

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University fuels NextCloud's improved monitoring

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Linux Kernel Developers on 25 Years of Linux

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Car manufacturers cooperate to build the car of the future

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Torvalds at LinuxCon: The Highlights and the Lowlights

On Wednesday, when Linus Torvalds was interviewed as the opening keynote of the day at LinuxCon 2016, Linux was a day short of its 25th birthday. Interviewer Dirk Hohndel of VMware pointed out that in the famous announcement of the operating system posted by Torvalds 25 years earlier, he had said that the OS “wasn’t portable,” yet today it supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. Torvalds also wrote, “it probably never will support anything other than AT-harddisks.” Read more