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Ubuntu

UBports Update

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • UBports Community Q&A: April 15, 2017

    Today marked another Q&A session in the books. You can find it right over here on our shiny new Youtube channel! The following are the majority of asked questions and a summary of their answers.

  • More Details On UBports' Plans For Unity, Mir & Anbox

    The UBports community are among those planning to fork the work on Unity 8 and they've already made ambitious plans like porting Unity 8 to Wayland. More details were revealed today.

    The UBports team issued their latest FAQs with some interesting remarks:

Ubuntu, Raspbian, and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • [Video] Ubuntu convergence Phone Tablet Desktop
  • I built this computer for $50—and you can too

    With the kit, just plug everything in and choose "Raspbian" from the list of options the first time. Voila, a fully-functioning computer emerges!

  • The State Of Debian 9.0 Stretch

    Debian developers are preparing for the final phase of the development freeze on Debian 9.0 "Stretch" and it's looking like the official release might not be too far out.

  • Status on the stretch release
  • Underestimating Debian

    I had two issues in the last days that lead me a bit into panic until they got solved. In both cases the issue was external to Debian but I first thought that the problem was in Debian. I’m not sure why I had those thoughts, I should be more confident in myself, this awesome operating system, and the community around it! The good thing is that I’ll be more confident from now on, and I’ve learned that hurry is not a good friend, and I should face my computer “problems” (and everything in life, probably) with a bit more patience (and backups).

Welcome Ubuntu Budgie 17.04: A Short Review

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Budgie begins its debut as official Ubuntu family in 17.04 "Zesty Zapus" release. It's a new choice of flavors with new desktop environment (Budgie) as operating system for us. Ubuntu Budgie is crafted purely for desktop use, no tablet-like interface (like Unity or GNOME), thanks to Budgie DE. So I want to introduce Ubuntu Budgie 17.04 to beginners especially if they're new to GNU/Linux. I hope you'll enjoy Ubuntu Budgie starting from this review.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • What To Do After Installing Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus

    If you're a new comer to Ubuntu in 17.04 Zesty Zapus release, then welcome, this article is for you. This introduces some options you can do once finished installing Ubuntu. There are 13 options listed you can choose, mainly about applications and some tweakings. You'll find some list about software replacements (if you come from Windows) and also educational apps. I hope this what-to-do article helps you to be a new Ubuntu user easier. Enjoy Ubuntu 17.04!

  • Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) Available For Download
  • Ubuntu 17.04 "Zesty Zapus" All Flavors Download Links
  • Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus Has Been Released (Download Links)
  • Downloading Ubuntu 17.04 with Zsync, Saving Bandwidth Cost
  • Ubuntu 17.04 Released, Not Much Changed

    Canonical finally announced the release of Ubuntu 17.04. Codenamed “Zesty Zapus”. In general, there doesn’t exist any new features or important updates. Just newer packages with bugs fixed and problems addressed from previous releases.

  • Ubuntu Unity – Present, Past and Future Discussed
  • Ubuntu GNOME 17.04 Released and What’s Next

    The Ubuntu GNOME developers are proud to announce our latest non-LTS release 17.04. For the first time in Ubuntu GNOME’s history, this release includes the latest stable release of GNOME, 3.24.

    Although Ubuntu’s release schedule was originally centered around shipping the latest GNOME release, this had not been possible since Ubuntu GNOME’s first release four years ago.

  • "Jono Bacon" - Lunduke Hour - Apr 11, 2017

    In this episode of the Lunduke Hour, I talk with my buddy Jono Bacon. The former Community Manager for Canonical waxes poetic about the recent announcements and what they mean -- and offers some advice for the current team at Canonical. He also says the word "community" very few times. So proud of the little guy.

  • Return Home to GNOME

    A while back I wrote about the importance of those of us in the Ubuntu community coming together around Ubuntu's Unity 8 project. The post was called "Return Home and Unify". I wrote that in order to promote the idea to contributing to the desktop that would inevitably ship on Ubuntu so that the experience would be a good one for its users. I wanted convergence to be a real thing, so that there would be a more open alternative to iOS (closed-source) and Android (open source but heavily controlled by Google) in the phone and tablet space. But that Unity 8 isn't happening and, here's the kicker, I'm just fine with it.

  • 6 Things Gnome Shell needs to do Before Ubuntu 18.04

    Few days ago Canonical, company behind Ubuntu, announced that they will end development of their signature desktop environment, Unity. Starting with 18.04 release, Ubuntu will ship with Gnome Shell as the default environment. Although I have been using Ubuntu Gnome as my primary work environment for about two years now, this made me a bit sad since Unity 8 preview looked really amazing.

  • Snaps and snapcraft.io explained in 3 minutes
  • Ubuntu Mate 17.04 - The Refined Gold Standard

    In this video we take a look at some of the refinements of Ubuntu Mate 17.04 and I get into a little history of the OS from Martin himself. This is a great all around distro and it is worth your time to try it out. Thanks for watching and thanks to everyone involved on the project.

  • The theater of Linux distributions

    The two most extreme Theater distros are Linux Lite and LXLE. The only thing that gives them their character are the PPAs they're built with, and if even one of those PPAs isn't maintained by its creator, the whole thing falls apart. You can't do any updates but the ones they demand, and you have to do every one of those. If you add something or change something, it's all over, they just disintegrate. Can't afford to have actors ad-lib!

Canonical Gets Serious About Doing Enterprise Right

Filed under
Ubuntu

With what we now know -- that Canonical is working overtime to attract investors -- it become apparent that the activity we've seen coming from the Isle of Man during the past week or so is a carefully orchestrated series of events designed to both reassure its enterprise customers and to get word to potential investors that Canonical is getting its priorities in order.

It all started last week with Mark Shuttleworth's announcement that the company is killing Unity, which has been Ubuntu's default desktop since 2011. Development of Unity 8 is ceasing immediately, he said, and Unity 7 will no longer be the default desktop, beginning with version 18.04 which will be released next April. With the death of Unity comes the death of Ubuntu's phone and convergence efforts, which never got traction, as well as the company's go-it-alone display server, Mir, which had been seen as a disruption by many Linux developers. Mir will still have a life, however, in the company's IoT offerings.

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The Future of Desktop Ubuntu

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

There hasn’t been this much news about a single Linux distro in like forever. Well, maybe when Caldera, operating under the name SCO, sued IBM for a cool billion, but other than that…nada. One thing’s for sure, the announcements that have been coming out of the Isle of Man for the last couple of weeks mean that Canonical has forever changed its course.

It also indicates that Mark Shuttleworth has decided that it’s now do or die time — you know, put up or shut up, money talks and bullcrap walks and all that. This means that from this point forward, Canonical will no longer be a company focused on the desktop. From here on out, it’s enterprise all the way, baby.

That’s probably going to work out well for enterprise users of Linux — time will tell. It doesn’t bode well for down in the trenches users of desktop Linux. From here on out, at Canonical, desktop Linux will be job number two. If that.

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Ubuntu Server 17.04 Ships with OpenStack Ocata, LXD 2.12, QEMU 2.8 & Libvirt 2.5

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical announced the release of Ubuntu Server 17.04 (Zesty Zapus), the latest and most advanced version of the popular operating system, supporting the newest LXD, Kubernetes, Docker, and Snappy technologies.

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Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus Released Available To Download

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

​Telegram is a messenger designed to overcome the limitations of other messengers like WhatsApp or similar ones. It is different and better than other messengers on more than one level. A few of the important features that make it stand out among other messengers are:

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Canonical Announces General Availability of Kubernetes 1.6 on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical, through Marco Ceppi, was pleased to announce the general availability of Kubernetes 1.6 open-source container orchestration to the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system.

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Android Leftovers

The Licensing and Compliance Lab interviews AJ Jordon of gplenforced.org

So basically Bradley Kuhn gave a talk at FOSDEM '17 about GPL enforcement and I was like, wow, it sucks how many companies and people think that enforcing the GPL is a bad idea. I mean, if you disagree with copyleft that's fine (though I personally would argue with that position), but then you should use a suitable license. Like MIT. The very idea that we shouldn't enforce the GPL just doesn't make sense to me because it suggests that the text of the license is watery and unimportant. I don't know about you, but when I say I want my programs to respect users' freedom, I mean it. So GPL enforcement is important. It seemed to me that there are probably a lot of developers out there who want to support GPL enforcement but don't have a good way to voice that support. gplenforced.org is essentially a quick and dirty hack I wrote to make that dead-simple. Read more

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