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Ubuntu

Red Hat eye from the Ubuntu guy: Fedora – how you doin'?

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Red Hat
Ubuntu

Comment Red Hat is the biggest – and one of the oldest – companies in the Linux world, but despite the difficulty of accurately measuring Linux usage figures, Ubuntu and its relatives seem to be the most popular Linux distributions. Red Hat isn’t sitting idle, though. Despite its focus on enterprise software, including virtualisation, storage and Java tools, it’s still aggressively developing its family of distros: RHEL, CentOS and Fedora.

Fedora is the freebie community-supported version, with a short six-month release cycle, but it’s still important. Although RHEL is the flagship, it’s built from components developed and tested in Fedora. According to Fedora Project Lead Matthew Miller told this year’s Flock to Fedora conference this summer its future looks bright.

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Ubuntu 16.10 Now Offers More than 500 Snaps, Including VLC 3.0.0 and Krita 3.0.1

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Ubuntu

With the release of the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) operating system, Canonical also had the pleasure of informing the community about the latest status of their Snaps universal binary packages.

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Canonical Brings Its Ubuntu OpenStack and Ceph Offerings to 64-bit ARM Servers

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Ubuntu

Canonical informs Softpedia about their latest collaboration with ARM, the industry's leading supplier of microprocessor technology, to bring the company's OpenStack and Ceph offerings to 64-bit ARM-based servers.

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Ubuntu 16.10 targets hybrid cloud deployments, supports Unity 8 development

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Ubuntu

Canonical, developer of Ubuntu, a distribution of Linux, released a new version of its software that targets hybrid cloud deployments. Ubuntu is often mentioned as one of the top 3 distributions of Linux when shipments are considered, depending upon which research firm one cites.

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Ubuntu 16.10: Yakkety Yak... Unity 8's not wack

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Ubuntu

Canonical's Ubuntu 16.10, codenamed "Yakkety Yak", is nowhere near as chunky an update as 16.04 LTS was earlier this year. But that doesn't mean there's nothing new. In fact, the firm's second release of the year has quite a few fresh features to hold users over until the bright and shiny future of Unity 8 and Mir arrive some time next year.

Nevertheless, it's very odd to have what feels like a smaller update arrive with Ubuntu's October release, which typically is the more experimental release with tons of new features being tested. This time around that's not really the case. In what's become a familiar refrain for Ubuntu, most of the work is happening with the still-not-quite-there Unity 8.

Ubuntu 16.10 marks the seventh time Unity 8 has not been ready for prime time. While Unity 8 appears to be progressing - judging by developer updates and playing with pre-release versions - it is, at this point, in danger of joining Duke Nukem Forever on the great vaporware list in the sky. Still, take heart Ubuntu fans, just as Duke Nukem Forever did eventually see the light of day, it seems very likely that Unity 8 and Mir will in fact be released eventually. Perhaps even as early as 17.04. Also, I have a bridge for sale, if anyone is interested.

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Canonical Now Offering Live Kernel Patching Services, Free for Up to Three PCs

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Security
Ubuntu

Today, October 18, 2016, Canonical informs us, through Dustin Kirkland, about a new interesting feature for Ubuntu Linux, which users can enable on their current installations.

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Also: Canonical Rolls Out Its Own Kernel Livepatching Service For Ubuntu

Meet Maui 1, the Slick New Hawaiian Netrunner

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Maui, the Netrunner Kubuntu replacement, is an inviting alternative. It is both new and already accomplished. The developers took a Kubuntu distro that was well-oiled but at the end of its development line to the next level.

That should make adopting the Maui Linux distro a less risky option. Most other Linux distros are moving in the new direction of Wayland, Systemd and such. Maui's developers are already there.

Maui 1 is very stable and easy to use. It is a well-stocked distribution with an established library of KDE software.

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Why the IoT security nightmare could be a dream for Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

A couple of weeks ago, I wrote about how the poor design of Internet of Things devices poses a serious threat to the Internet. By an interesting coincidence, security guru Bruce Schneier wrote about the same issue on the same day, albeit rather more authoritatively. Other articles on the topic continue to appear, as people begin to wake up to the seriousness of this issue.

On Monday, I attended the opening day of Oscon in London, and listening to Canonical's Mark Shuttleworth talk about "Brilliant pebbles," it seemed to me that he was outlining part of a possible solution to IoT's problems. Here's a description of his keynote:

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Ubuntu Leftovers

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Ubuntu
  • New Tool Lets You Easily Install the Ubuntu Touch OS on Your Mobile Devices

    Softpedia was just informed by Marius Quabeck from UbuntuFun.de about a new tool that lets users super easily install the Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system on their devices.

    The tool is developed by Marius Quabeck himself and is called magic-device-tool. The first stable version, magic-device-tool 1.0, is now available to everyone and promises to offer a simple and easy-to-use batch tool for installing Canonical's Ubuntu Touch mobile OS, as well as Android, Cyanogenmod, or Phoenix OS.

    In other words, you'll be able to replace your mobile operating system on your device with any of the following: the latest Ubuntu Touch release, Cyanogenmod - with or without the GAPPS (Google Apps) package, the factory Android image, as well as Phoenix OS. Please note that you'll only be able to run one of these OSes on your mobile devices.

  • Canonical Brings Ubuntu OpenStack, Ceph to ARM Servers

    Telco and enterprise customers are looking for an alternative source of silicon beyond Intel for data center silicon, Canonical officials say.
    ARM officials took a step forward in their effort to build the software ecosystem around its efforts in the data center when Canonical said that its Ubuntu OpenStack and Ceph offerings are now commercially available on servers powered by ARM's 64-bit chip architecture.

  • Ubuntu OpenStack and Ceph Storage now available on ARM v8-A

    Unified solution will benefit majority of public cloud services, Canonical explained

    Canonical and ARM have announced a strategic partnership, making Ubuntu OpenStack and Ceph Storage now available on ARM v8-A-based enterprise solutions.

    Working together with Ubuntu certified System on Chip (SoC) partners, ODMs and OEMs, the two companies will ensure the equipment used by customers, such as servers, storage and networking products can be used with Ubuntu Advantage.

    “We have seen our Telecom and Enterprise customers start to radically depart from traditional server design to innovative platform architectures for scale-out compute and storage. In partnering with ARM we bring more innovation and platform choice to the marketplace,” Mark Baker, product manager of OpenStack at Canonical said.

  • Canonical gives Ubuntu Linux 17.04 the name 'Zesty Zapus' (jumping mouse)

    Linux distributions and silly names go together like peanut butter and jelly. For whatever reason, the maintainers of these operating systems seem to enjoy having fun with what they call them -- some argue it is childish. Even Google -- a billion dollar company -- uses sugary dessert names for the Linux-based Android operating system.

    One of the most well-known Linux distributions to use funny names is Ubuntu. It famously uses the convention of an adjective and a lesser-known animal, each starting with the same letter. The letter is chosen sequentially by alphabet. For example, Ubuntu 16.10 uses the letter "Y" -- "Yakkety Yak". The next version of the operating system will use the letter "Z". While many folks hoped for "Zebra", that would be too obvious. Instead, Canonical has chosen "Zesty Zapus". Don't know what a zapus is? Neither did I. It is apparently a type of jumping mouse. The selection was not made at random, however, as the company has an explanation for the decision.

  • Upcoming Zesty Zapus, Bodhi 4 Beta 3

    Mark Shuttleworth today blogged of the "metaphorical" naming of the release has reached the end of the alphabet with 17.04's Zesty Zapus. Apparently, a zapus is "a genus of North American jumping mice," thanks to Wikipedia, and is the only living mammal to have 18 teeth. The genus includes three distinct subspecies and has inhabited Earth since the Pliocene. They have long tails, long back feet, yellowish-brown backs and white bellies. Zesty means "having an agreeably pungent taste," according to the collective dictionary databases of KDict.

  • Ubuntu MATE 16.10 - quick screenshot tour

    Ubuntu MATE became an officially supported family member not so long ago. Linux notes from DarkDuck have already published a review of Ubuntu MATE 16.04.

Ubuntu Leftovers (New Name, ARM, and More)

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Ubuntu
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