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Ubuntu

Canonical founder explains why they abandoned the Unity project for Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

Back in April, Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth, in a move that shocked everyone, announced that the company was ending support for Unity in Ubuntu. For the uninitiated, Unity was the company's plan to build a converged Linux desktop that would work on mobile devices, desktops, and even TVs. Its latest release, Ubuntu 17.10, marks the first version of the OS to ship without Unity, employing GNOME instead. After several months of speculation, Shuttleworth has finally outed the rationale behind the decision.

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Ubuntu Leftovers

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Will Likely Ship With Linux 4.15

    Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, the recently named "Bionic Beaver", will most likely be shipping with a Linux 4.15-based kernel.

  • Display Network Traffic in the Ubuntu Panel with NetSpeed

    If you’re running Ubuntu 17.10 (or any distro that uses GNOME Shell) you can do so easily by installing a network monitor GNOME extension.

    A wealth of network monitor extensions are available for GNOME Shell (and by extension, excuse the pun, Ubuntu too) including ‘netmonitor‘ and ‘simple net speed‘.

    But one of my favourites (because of its sheer simplicity) is the perfectly titled NetSpeed.

  • Why Did Ubuntu Drop Unity? Mark Shuttleworth Explains

    Ubuntu’s decision to ditch Unity took all of us — even me — by surprise when announced back in April.

    Now Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth shares more details about why Ubuntu chose to drop Unity.

    And the answer might surprise…

    Actually, no; the answer probably won’t surprise you.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS is Called ‘Bionic Beaver’

    The Ubuntu 18.04 LTS name has been revealed — say hello to ‘Bionic Beaver’!

    Announcing the name with his trademark alliterative flair set firmly to full, Mark Shuttleworth says the 18.04 LTS release will “represent the sum of all our interests.”

  • Mark Shuttleworth reveals Ubuntu 18.04 LTS codename

    In the past couple of days, Canonical released its latest version of Ubuntu 17.10, now it’s time for the company to look ahead to its next release 18.04 LTS (Long Term Support). As will all versions before it, 18.04 will carry a goofy codename with it. The company’s CEO, today, announced that the upcoming release will be dubbed "Bionic Beaver".

Samsung adds more secure Artik models, and switches from Fedora to Ubuntu

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Red Hat
Ubuntu

Samsung unveiled extra-secure versions of its Artik COMs, including a new Artik 055s model, and it’s switching its Artik 530 and 710 from Fedora to Ubuntu.

At last week’s Samsung Developer Conference (SDC) 2017 in San Francisco, Samsung announced several updates to its Artik line of computer-on-modules. The Korean CE giant has always touted the security features of its Artik modules, but it now has taken the extra step of releasing new security enhanced versions of its major Artik modules. The ultra-secure Artik 053s, 530s, and 710s COMs are priced the same as the earlier, almost identical Artik 053, 530, and 710, which will presumably be phased out.

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Should You Use Linux Mint's Debian or Standard Edition?

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GNU
Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

At first, users might wonder why Linux Mint offers both its Ubuntu-based Linux Mint Standard Edition and the Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE). Since Debian, Linux Mint, and Ubuntu all derive from the Debian repositories, isn't the family resemblance too close to bother?

To the casual user, the choice may appear to be no more than the result of Linux Mint trying to accommodate as many users as possible. However, depending on your needs and preferences, you may find that one edition suits your needs more than the other.

In general, the two editions have much in common. Both the Debian and the standard editions are available in 32- and 64-bit downloads that default to the Cinnamon or Mate desktops. Both use the same installer, and both open for the first time on desktops with similar wallpapers and tools. Both, too, can add other desktop environments from the Mint repositories that they both share. According to Linux Mint, LMDE is faster than the standard edition, but in practice the difference is slight enough that many users probably never notice.

However, look closer, and the differences start to appear -- although these difference have changed over the years. For example, it is no longer true that the LMDE is a rolling release -- one that adds new packages as they become available, rather than waiting for a general release -- although LMDE 1 was.

Also, contrary to a widely circulating story, LMDE 2 is fully capable of using Ubuntu PPA repositories for packages in development. The PPAs simply have to be added as a package source in /etc/apt/. Alternatively, their packages can be downloaded and installed using the dpkg command. Since Debian and Ubuntu have been different distros for well over a decade now, you may find that some packages from PPAs are not compatible with Debian, but these cases are relatively rare, particularly if you stick to productivity applications rather than core system components.

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Beavering away at the brilliantly bionic 18.04 LTS

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Ubuntu

Congratulations to Team *Buntu on the release of our Artful Aardvark 17.10, featuring all your favourite desktop environments, kubernetes 1.8, the latest OpenStack, and security updates for 9 months, which takes us all the way to our next enterprise release, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

A brumous development cycle always makes for cool-headed work and brisk progress on the back of breem debate.

As always, 18.04 LTS will represent the sum of all our interests.

For those of you with bimodal inclinations, there’s the official upstream Kubernetes-on-Ubuntu spell for ‘conjure-up kubernetes’ with bijou multi-cloud goodness. We also have spells for OpenStack on Ubuntu and Hadoop on Ubuntu, so conjure-up is your one-stop magic shop for at-scale boffo big data, cloud and containers. Working with upstreams to enable fast deployment and operations of their stuff on all the clouds is a beamish way to spend the day.

If your thing is bling, pick a desktop! We’ve defaulted to GNOME, but we’re the space where KDE and GNOME and MATE and many others come together to give users real and easy choice of desktops. And if you’re feeling boned by the lack of Unity in open source, you might want to hop onto the channel and join those who are updating Unity7 for the newest X and kernel graphics in 18.04.

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Also: Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Dubbed as the "Bionic Beaver," Launches April 26, 2018

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Is The "Bionic Beaver"

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Is Named ‘Bionic Beaver’

Ubuntu Kylin 17.10 and Recommended Applications for Ubuntu 17.10

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Kylin 17.10 Releases for Chinese Linux Users with Own Video Player, More

    The Ubuntu Kylin team was pleased to announce the release of Ubuntu Kylin 17.10 for Chinese Linux users as part of the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system.

    Coming with the same internals of Ubuntu 17.10, the Ubuntu Kylin 17.10 release adds improvements to the desktop environment and featured applications. It's powered by the latest Linux 4.13 kernel, which features asynchronous I/O improvements, SMB 3.0 as default protocol for CIFS mounts, and several EXT4 enhancements.

    Its MATE-based UKUI desktop environment received a brand-new icon theme, Start Menu optimizations, adjustments to the lockscreen setting page and control panel layout, as well as various improvements to the file manager, including new "Unzip" and "Open by Terminal" functions in the right-click context menu.

  • Recommended Applications for Ubuntu 17.10

    Here I list useful free software applications for Ubuntu 17.10 users. This including lightweight web browsers, video player, and also alternatives to Adobe Photoshop, CorelDRAW, or such nonfree software applications. You also can read how to install them here. I hope this list will help you in your first days using Artful Aardvark!

What Will the Ubuntu 18.04 Name ‘B’?

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Ubuntu

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • APT 1.6 alpha 1 – seccomp and more

    I just uploaded APT 1.6 alpha 1, introducing a very scary thing: Seccomp sandboxing for methods, the programs downloading files from the internet and decompressing or compressing stuff. With seccomp I reduced the number of system calls these methods can use to 149 from 430. Specifically we excluded most ways of IPC, xattrs, and most importantly, the ability for methods to clone(2), fork(2), or execve(2) (or execveat(2)). Yes, that’s right – methods can no longer execute programs.

  • Debian Policy call for participation -- October 2017

    Here’s are some of the bugs against the Debian Policy Manual. In particular, there really are quite a few patches needing seconds from DDs.

  • Free Software Efforts (2017W42)

    Here’s my weekly report for week 42 of 2017. In this week I have replaced my spacebar, failed to replace a HDD and begun the process to replace my YubiKey.

  • Winners of the Ubuntu 17.10 Free Culture Showcase

    Every new Ubuntu cycle brings many changes, and the arrival of Ubuntu 17.10, the “Artful Aardvark” release, brings more changes than usual. The default desktop has changed to GNOME Shell, with some very thoughtful changes by the desktop team to make it more familiar. And of course, the community wallpapers included with this exciting new release have changed as well!

    Every cycle, talented artists around the world create media and release it under licenses that encourage sharing and adaptation. For Ubuntu 17.10, 50 images were submitted to the Ubuntu 17.10 Free Culture Showcase photo pool on Flickr, where all eligible submissions can be found.

System76 Unveils First Release of Pop!_OS Linux Distro, Based on Ubuntu 17.10

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OS
Linux
Ubuntu

System76, the maker of Linux-based computers, is proud to announce the first-ever release of Pop!_OS Linux, its own GNU/Linux distribution based on Canonical's Ubuntu OS.

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Lubuntu Next 17.10 Rolls Out to Early Adopters with LXQt 0.11.1 Desktop

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Ubuntu

Lubuntu team announced the release and immediate availability for download of Lubuntu 17.10 and Lubuntu Next 17.10 distributions as part of the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system.

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Also: Ubuntu Kylin 17.10 Releases for Chinese Linux Users with Own Video Player, More

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today's howtos

Graphics: Texture Compression, Enlightenment Foundation Libraries (EFL), and AMD FreeSync

  • Unity Continues Crunching More Out Of Crunch Texture Compression
    Unity is one of the big public users of the open-source Crunch DXT texture compression library. While it's no longer maintained by Rich Geldreich / Binomial, Unity has continued advancing this open-source code to further improve the compression ratio and speed. For months Unity has been talking about their promising findings with Crunch. But this is the project that Rich Geldreich, the former Valve developer, previously expressed regret having open-sourced all of it. While he is on to working on better and more advanced technologies at his Binomial startup, Unity is working to squeeze more out of this open-source library.
  • Improving EFL Graphics With Wayland Application Redraws
    Under X, application redraws are tricky to do without tearing because content can be updated at any chosen time with no clear feedback as to when the compositor will read it. EFL uses some clever tricks to this end (check out the state of the art X redraw timing for yourself), but it’s difficult to get right in all cases. For a lot of people this just works, or they’re not sensitive to the issue when it doesn’t.
  • Improved Wayland Application Redraws Coming To Enlightenment's EFL
    Samsung's Open-Source Group has been working on making their Wayland support in the Enlightenment Foundation Libraries (EFL) even better. The latest Wayland work on the Enlightenment/EFL front has been improving the application redraw process. The EFL toolkit with the upcoming v1.21 release will now be hooking into Wayland's frame callbacks to better dealing with drawing, only drawing when necessary, and doing so without the possibility of tearing.
  • AMD FreeSync For Tear-Free Linux Gaming - Current State In 2017
    If you are thinking of gifting yourself (or someone else) a FreeSync-compatible monitor this holiday season, here's a look at how the AMD FreeSync support is working right now, the driver bits you need to be aware of, and how it's all playing out for those wanting to use this tear-free capability for Linux gaming.

KStars 2.8.9 is released!

Here comes the last KStars release for 2017! KStars v2.8.9 is available now for Windows, MacOS, and Linux. Robert Lancaster worked on improving PHD2 support with Ekos. This includes retrieving the guide star image, drift errors and RMS values, among other minor improvements and refactoring of the Ekos PHD2 codebase to support future extensions. Read more

Security: Mirai, Vista 10, Starbucks, and Hacking Team Investigation

  • Mirai IoT Botnet Co-Authors Plead Guilty

    The U.S. Justice Department on Tuesday unsealed the guilty pleas of two men first identified in January 2017 by KrebsOnSecurity as the likely co-authors of Mirai, a malware strain that remotely enslaves so-called “Internet of Things” devices such as security cameras, routers, and digital video recorders for use in large scale attacks designed to knock Web sites and entire networks offline (including multiple major attacks against this site).

  • Google Researcher Finds Flaw in Pre-Installed Windows 10 Password Manager
    Google security researcher Tavis Ormandy, who has previously discovered, reported, and disclosed several major bugs in Windows and its features, came across a new security vulnerability affecting Microsoft users. This time, the flaw exists in the Keeper password manager that comes pre-installed in some Windows 10 versions, with Ormandy explaining that it’s similar to a vulnerability that he discovered in August 2016. “I remember filing a bug a while ago about how they were injecting privileged UI into pages,” Ormandy explained on December 14. “I checked and, they're doing the same thing again with this version,” he continues.
  • Starbucks Wi-Fi Turned People’s Laptops into Cryptocurrency Miners
    The free Wi-Fi that the Buenos Aires Starbucks offers to its customers was being used to mine for cryptocurrency, and what’s worse, it used people’s laptops to do it. The whole thing was discovered by Stensul CEO Noah Dinkin who actually paid a visit to the store and wanted to browse the web using the free Wi-Fi, only to discover that his laptop was unknowingly converted into a cryptocurrency miner. He then turned to Twitter to ask Starbucks if they know about the what he described as bitcoin mining taking place without customers knowing about it. “Hi Starbucks, did you know that your in-store wifi provider in Buenos Aires forces a 10 second delay when you first connect to the wifi so it can mine bitcoin using a customer's laptop? Feels a little off-brand,” he said in his tweet.
  • Italian Prosecutor Makes Request to Close Hacking Team Investigation
    The damaging data breach that exposed the secrets of an infamous surveillance tech company might go unsolved forever. After more than two years, the Italian prosecutor who was investigating the attack on the Milan-based Hacking Team has asked the case to be dismissed, according to multiple sources. On Monday, the Milan prosecutor Alessandro Gobbis sent a notice to the people under investigation informing them that he had sent the judge a request to shut down the investigation, according to a copy of the document obtained by Motherboard.