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Ubuntu

wattOS 10 Microwatt Edition Comes with Less of Everything, Based on Ubuntu 16.04

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Ubuntu

After releasing the LXDE edition of wattOS 10 at the beginning of the month, developer Ronald Ropp now announced the availability of the Microwatt Edition, which includes less of everything when compared to its bigger brother.

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How to: Install Google Chrome web browser on Ubuntu Linux (and uninstall Firefox)

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Ubuntu
HowTos

Ubuntu comes with a lot of quality software pre-installed. Unfortunately, the default web browser, Mozilla Firefox, has been on the decline -- it is slow and clunky. On Linux, Google Chrome is now the top web browser, and it is the best way to experience Adobe Flash content too (if you still need it).

Installing Google Chrome on the Linux-based operating system is not totally straightforward. This is unfortunate, as the search-giant's web browser is an important part of having an overall quality experience on Ubuntu. Don't worry, however, as we will help you to both install the wonderful Google Chrome and uninstall the disappointing Mozilla Firefox.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Phone, Sep 2016 - Vorsprung durch Touch

    The Ubuntu Phone is getting better, and with every new iteration of the OTA, my little BQ Aquaris E4.5 is gaining more speed and functionality. Like in the air force, with an avionics upgrade, which transforms ancient wings into a powerful and modern bird of prey. Only the pace of advancement is lagging behind the market. See what Android and iOS can do, even Windows Phone, and you realize how late and insufficiently meaningful the Ubuntu Phone really is. This has to change, massively.

    This latest round does bring some fine goods to the table - more speed and stability, better icons, more overall visual polish, incremental improvements in the applications and the scopes. But that's not enough to win the heart of the average user. A more radical, app-centric effort is required. More focus on delivering the mobile experience, be it as it may. Ubuntu cannot revolutionalize that which is already considered the past. It can only join the club and enjoy the benefits of a well-established reality. And that is a kickass app stack that makes the touch device worth using in the first place.

    Still, it's not all gloomy. E4.5 is a better product now than it was a year ago, fact. Ubuntu Phone is a better operating system than it was even this spring, fact. So maybe one day we will see Ubuntu become an important if not dominant player in the phone and tablet space. It sure is heading in the right direction, my only fear is the availability of resources to pull off this massive rehaul that is needed to make it stand up to the old and proven giants. And that's it really.

    If you're keen on Linux (not Android) making it in the mobile world, do not forget to check my Ubuntu tablet review! Especially the convergence piece. On that merry note, you do remember that I'm running a wicked contest this year, too? He/she who reads my books might get a chance to win an M10 tablet. Indeed. Off you go, dear readers. Whereas I will now run the same set of tests we did here on the Aquaris tablet, and see how it likes the OTA-12 upgrade. The end.

  • Ubuntu 16.10 Unity 8 - new window snapping feature
  • Ubuntu Online Summit for Ubuntu 17.04 is Taking Place In Mid-November
  • Ubuntu Online Summit: 15-16 November 2016

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

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Ubuntu

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Reproducible Builds: week 73 in Stretch cycle

    Ximin Luo started a new series of tools called (for now) debrepatch, to make it easier to automate checks that our old patches to Debian packages still apply to newer versions of those packages, and still make these reproducible.

  • Linux Top 3: Tails 2.6, Android-x86 6.0 and Deepin 15.3
  • Debian-Based Q4OS 2.2.1 "Scorpion" Linux OS Ships with LXQt Alongside Trinity

    Today, September 20, 2016, the Q4OS development team informs Softpedia about the immediate availability of an updated version of their work-in-progress Q4OS 2.0 "Scorpion" GNU/Linux operating system.

    Q4OS 2.2.1 is out now, and it comes as a drop-in replacement for the previous development release, namely Q4OS 2.1.1, bringing all sort of updated components and new technologies based, of course, on the upstream Debian Testing repositories. These include Linux kernel 4.6, Trinity Desktop Environment (TDE) 14.0.4, and GCC 6.

  • Get your own $80 private cloud server kit with Nextcloud Box!

    Nextcloud, an open source, self-hosted file sync and share and communication app platform, has teamed up with Canonical and WDLabs to release a Raspberry Pi and Ubuntu Linux powered cloud server called Nextcloud Box for homes and offices.

    According to the company, the Nextcloud Box is a secure, private, self-hosted cloud and Internet of Things (IoT) platform. It makes hosting a personal cloud simple and cost effective whilst maintaining a secure private environment that can be expanded with additional features via apps.

    “It has been a great co-operation with amazingly agile teams at Canonical and WDLabs,” said Frank Karlitschek, Founder and Managing Director, Nextcloud.

  • Simple Weather Indicator for Ubuntu Now Has Its Own PPA

    A new version of the 'no frills' weather indicator that I use on my Ubuntu desktop is available to download — and it finally has a PPA.

Ubuntu Touch OTA-13 Officially Released for All Ubuntu Phones and Tablets

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Ubuntu

We reported yesterday on the upcoming availability of the Ubuntu Touch OTA-13 software update for Ubuntu Phone and Ubuntu Tablet devices, and it looks like Canonical finally started the phased update earlier today.

Canonical's Lukasz Zemczak informs us that the main OTA-13 images have been successfully copied from the rc-proposed channel to the stable one for users to update but, as expected, it's phased during the next 24 hours, so not everyone will get it at the same time.

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Also: Ubuntu tees up OpenStack on IBM's iron

Ubuntu Phone OTA-13

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Ubuntu

Canonical Releases New Linux Kernel Updates for Ubuntu 16.04, 14.04 & 12.04 LTS

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Ubuntu

Just a few moments ago (September 19, 2016), Canonical published several security advisories to inform the Ubuntu Linux community about the availability of new Linux kernel updates for all supported Ubuntu releases.

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Also: Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, Zorin OS 12 Linux Enters Beta with Many New Features

Black Lab Linux 7.7 Officially Released with Latest Security Updates from Ubuntu

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Linux
Ubuntu

Today, September 19, 2016, Black Lab Software's CEO Robert J. Dohnert informs Softpedia about the release of the seventh maintenance update to the long-term supported Black Lab Linux 7 computer operating system series.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Linux Graphics

  • The RADV Radeon Vulkan Linux Driver Continues Picking Up Features
  • OpenChrome Maintainer Making Some Progress On VIA DRM Driver
    Independent developer Kevin Brace took over maintaining the OpenChrome DDX driver earlier this year to improve the open-source VIA Linux graphics support while over the summer he's slowly been getting up to speed on development of the OpenChrome DRM driver. The OpenChrome DRM driver was making progress while James Simmons was developing it a few years back, but since he left the project, it's been left to bit rot. It will take a lot of work even to get this previously "good" code back to working on the latest Linux 4.x mainline kernels given how DRM core interfaces have evolved in recent times.
  • My talk about Mainline Explicit Fencing at XDC 2016!
    Last week I was at XDC in Helsinki where I presented about the Explicit Fencing work we’ve been doing on the Mainline Linux Kernel in the lastest few months. There was a livestream of all presentations during the conference and recorded sections are available. You can check the video of my presentation. Check out the slides too.

Linux Kernel News

  • Linux 4.8 gets rc8
    Chill, penguin-fanciers: Linux lord Linus Torvalds is sitting on the egg that is Linux 4.8 for another week. As Torvalds indicated last week, this version of the kernel still needs work and therefore earned itself an eighth release candidate.
  • Linux 4.8-rc8 Released: Linux 4.8 Next Weekend
  • Linux Kernel 4.7.5 Released with Numerous ARM and Networking Improvements
    The fifth maintenance update to the Linux 4.7 kernel series, which is currently the most advanced, secure and stable kernel branch you can get for your GNU/Linux operating system, has been announced by Greg Kroah-Hartman. Linux kernel 4.7.5 is here only ten days after the release of the previous maintenance version, namely Linux kernel 4.7.4, and it's a big update that changes a total of 213 files, with 1774 insertions and 971 deletions, which tells us that the kernel developers and hackers had a pretty busy week patching all sorts of bugs and security issues, as well as to add various, much-needed improvements.
  • Blockchain Summit Day Two: End-Of-Conference Highlights From Shanghai
    Financial services firms and startups looking to be the bridge to blockchain ledgers continued to dominate presentations on the second and final day of the Blockchain Summit, ending International Blockchain Week in Shanghai that also saw Devcon2 and a startup demo competition.
  • Testing Various HDDs & SSDs On Ubuntu With The Linux 4.8 Kernel
    Here are some fresh benchmarks of various solid-state drives (SATA 3.0 SSDs plus two NVMe M.2 SSDs) as well as two HDDs for getting a fresh look at how they are performing using the Linux 4.8 Git kernel. After publishing Friday's Intel 600P Series NVME SSD tests of this lower-cost NVM Express storage line-up, I continued testing a few other SSDs and HDDs. These additional reference points are available for your viewing pleasure today. The additional data is also going to be used for reference in a Linux 4.8-based BCache SSD+HDD comparison being published next week. Stay tuned for those fresh BCache numbers.

Behind the GNOME 3.22 Release Video

This is less than usual. The time saving mostly stems from spending less time recording for the release video. At first thought you might think recording would be a breeze but it can be one of the most frustrating aspects of making the videos. Each cycle the GNOME community lands improvement a wide set of GNOME’s applications. So before each release I have to find some way to run a dozen of applications from master. I do this either by: Read more