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Ubuntu

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

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Debian
Ubuntu

Lessons learned from the failure of Ubuntu Touch

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Ubuntu

With the death of yet another open source/free software/Linux-based mobile platform, Ubuntu Touch, clearly it is time for us to sit down and have a frank discussion about what we in the free software world can reasonably accomplish in a mobile platform.

One of the biggest issues—if not THE biggest issue—with Ubuntu Touch was that it simply had goals that were far too aggressive to reasonably achieve. It suffered from the all-too-common malady known in software development as feature creep.

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City Cloud gets Ubuntu Certified

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Ubuntu

European Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) provider City Network, has joined the Ubuntu Certified Public Cloud (CPC) programme. This is the second very big European win for Ubuntu after it signed up OVH earlier this month. As an Ubuntu CPC partner, City Cloud will no longer need to create, curate, patch and maintain Ubuntu images. This will all be done by Ubuntu who will then provide them to City Network.

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Ubuntu Images for Oracle

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Server
Ubuntu
  • Certified Ubuntu Images available on Oracle Bare Metal Cloud Service

    Certified Ubuntu images are now available in the Oracle Bare Metal Cloud Services, providing developers with compute options ranging from single to 16 OCPU virtual machines (VMs) to high-performance, dedicated bare metal compute instances. This is in addition to the image already offered on Oracle Compute Cloud Service and maintains the ability for enterprises to add Canonical-backed Ubuntu Advantage Support and Systems Management. Oracle and Canonical customers now have access to the latest Ubuntu features, compliance accreditations and security updates.

  • Canonical's Certified Ubuntu Images Land in Oracle's Bare Metal Cloud Service

    Canonical announced the official availability of Certified Ubuntu images in Oracle's Bare Metal Cloud Services, which accompany the images that the company already provides in the Oracle Compute Cloud Service.

    Canonical's Certified Ubuntu images in Oracle Bare Metal Cloud Services are a great addition because they promise to provide developers with dedicated, high-performance bare-metal compute instances, as well as virtual machines with up to 16 Oracle Compute Unit (OCPU). They also add the ability for Oracle's enterprise customers to access the latest and greatest Ubuntu features.

Ubuntu 17.04: Unity's swan song?

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Reviews
Ubuntu

For the most part, not much has changed on Ubuntu's Desktop edition in the past year. Unity 7 has more or less remained the same while work was progressing on the next version of the desktop, Unity 8. However, now that both desktops are being retired in favour of the GNOME desktop, running Ubuntu 17.04 feels a bit strange. This week I was running software that has probably reached the end of its life and this version of Ubuntu will only be supported for nine months. I could probably get the same desktop experience and most of the same hardware support running Ubuntu 16.04 and get security updates through to 2021 in the bargain. In short, I don't think Ubuntu 17.04 offers users anything significant over last year's 16.04 LTS release and it will be retired sooner.

That being said, I could not help but be a little wistful about using Unity 7 again. Even though it has been about a year since I last used Unity, I quickly fell back into the routine and I was once more reminded how pleasant it can be to use Unity. The desktop is geared almost perfectly to my workflow and the controls are set up in a way that reduces my mouse usage to almost nothing. I find Unity a very comfortable desktop to use, especially when application menus have been moved from the top panel to inside their own windows. While there are some projects trying to carry on development of Unity, this release of Ubuntu feels like Unity's swan song and I have greatly enjoyed using the desktop this week.

While there is not much new in Ubuntu 17.04, the release is pretty solid. Apart from the confusion that may arise from having three different package managers, I found Ubuntu to be capable, fairly newcomer friendly and stable. Everything worked well for me, at least on physical hardware. Unity is a bit slow to use in a virtual machine, but the distribution worked smoothly on my desktop computer.

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Ubuntu Phone security updates end in June, app store closing

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Ubuntu
Gadgets

When Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Canonical (the company behind the Ubuntu Linux distribution), announced his company would not only be abandoning their custom desktop environment (Unity), but also halting development on their phone/tablet operating system, many questions were left unanswered.

One of those questions: What happens to the existing phones and tablets running Ubuntu Touch that have already been sold?

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Laptop Power, Boot Times With Ubuntu 17.04

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Ubuntu

I haven't posted any mobile/laptop Linux benchmarks recently since my newest laptop at the moment is still based on Broadwell with having no Kabylake laptop at the moment. But for those curious about any power/boot changes for mature Intel Broadwell hardware on Linux, hopefully you find these numbers today interesting.

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Themes for Ubuntu

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Ubuntu
  • Flattiance is a Flat Fork of Ubuntu’s Ambiance Theme

    Flattiance is pitched as a “semi-flat fork” of the Ubuntu Ambiance theme. You know, the one that ships out of the box and by default. On the whole Flattiance keeps to the same color palette, with dark browns and orange accents, but it ditches the gradient in app headers in favour of a solid block.

  • A quick look at some essential GNOME Shell tweaks and extensions

    Now that Ubuntu is moving to GNOME Shell, many people will get a bit of a shock at how different the workflow is from Unity to Shell. Here’s a quick look at some essentials to get you going.

Ubuntu and elementary

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Ubuntu
  • System76 wants to build its own hardware for its Linux-based computers

    System76 is building up quite a name for itself, being one of a very limited number of companies selling only computers running Linux-based operating systems. Now the aim is to branch out; System76 wants to design and build its own hardware, while representing the open source community as it does so.

    At the moment, the hardware used in System76 systems is outsourced, but in the future this will change. The company says that it is moving into phase three of its development cycle, and this "moves product design and manufacturing in house." And you should set your expectations high: "We're about to build the Model S of computers. Something so brilliant and beautiful that reviewers will have to add an 11 to their scores."

  • AppCenter Spotlight: Beta Testers

    Over the past month we’ve been beta testing the new AppCenter with a number of developers, from elementary OS contributors to backers of our Indiegogo campaign. After testing out the submission process and getting some apps into the store (and seeing rapid updates!), I wanted to take a moment to highlight some of the first apps.

  • elementary OS to get improved AppCenter, showing off a few new applications

    I have to hand it to the elementary OS guys, they have a massive focus on design and it does look quite incredible. It is easily one of the best looking Linux distributions, which I do admire. Their new AppCenter, for example, looks extremely clean and clear.

Leftovers: Debian, Ubuntu and Derivatives

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian Developers Make Progress With RISC-V Port

    Debian developers continue making progress with a -- currently unofficial -- port of their Linux operating system to RISC-V.

    There is a in-progress Debian GNU/Linux port to RISC-V along with a repository with packages built for RISC-V. RISC-V for the uninitiated is a promising, open-source ISA for CPUs. So far there isn't any widely-available RISC-V hardware, but there are embedded systems in the works while software emulators are available.

  • 2×08: Pique Oil
  • [Video] Ubuntu 17.04 KDE
  • deepin 15.4 Released, With Download Link & Mirrors

    deepin 15.4 GNU/Linux operating system has been released at April 19th 2017. I list here one official download link and two faster mirrors from Sourceforge. I listed here the Mega and Google mirrors as well but remember they don't provide direct download. The 15.4 provided only as 64 bit, the 32 bit version has already dropped (except by commercial support). I hope this short list helps you.

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Red Hat After Graphics People

GNOME News

  • Desk Changer is a Wallpaper Slideshow Extension for GNOME
    Have you been looking for a GNOME wallpaper slideshow extension? If so, you can stop. In the comments to our recent post on the way GNOME handles wallpapers a number of readers asked whether GNOME had an image slideshow feature built in, without the need for third-party apps and the like. The answer is yes, GNOME does. Sort of.
  • Minwaita: A Compact Version of Theme Adwaita for Gnome Desktop
    As you may already know that Ubuntu is switching back to Gnome, this is the transition time for Ubuntu to switch back. Some creators are motivated and creating themes for Gnome desktop, which is a good thing and hopefully we shall see plenty of Gnome themes and icons around soon. As its name shows "Minwaita" it is minimal/compact version of Adwaita theme, the theme is available after some enhancements to make Gnome more sleek and more vanilla Gnome experience without moving to away from Adwaita's design. This theme is compatible with Gnome 3.20 and up versions. This theme was released back in November, 2016 and still in continuous development that means if you find any problem or bug in the theme then report it to get it fixed in the next update. Obsidian-1 icons used in the following screenshots.
  • Gnome Pomodoro Timer Can Help You Increase Productivity
    If you are struggling with focus on something, it could be your work or study then try Pomodoro technique, this method developed by Francesco Cirillo in the late 1980s. The technique uses a timer to break down work into intervals, traditionally 25 minutes in length, separated by short breaks. You can read more about Pomodoro here.
  • Widget hierarchies in GTK+ 4.0
    In GTK+3, only GtkContainer subclasses can have child widgets. This makes a lot of sense for “public” container children like we know them, e.g. GtkBox — i.e. the developer can add, remove and reorder child widgets arbitrarily and the container just does layout.

Red Hat News

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian