Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ubuntu

Oh Snap – to boldly package where no one has packaged before

Filed under
Ubuntu

One of the great disadvantages of the Linux desktop is its software distribution mechanism. While the overall concept of central software repos works great and has been adapted into powerful Stores in commercial products, deploying and using programs, delivered as packages, is a tricky business. It stems from the wider fragmentation of the distro ecospace, and it essence, it means that if you want to release your product, you must compile it 150 odd ways, not just for different distributions but also for different versions of the same distribution. Naturally, this model scares away the big game.

Recently though, there have been several attempts to make Linux packages more cross-distro and minimize the gap between distributions. The name of the game: Snap, and we’ve tasted this app-container framework before. It is unto Linux what, well, Windows stuff is unto Windows, in a way. Not quite statically compiled stuff, but definitely independent. I had it tested again in Ubuntu 17.04, and it would appear that Snap is getting more and more traction. Let’s have another look.

Read more

Kubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zaphod - Kawabuntu!

Filed under
KDE
Reviews
Ubuntu

Let us continue with the spring season distro testing. Next on the menu: Kubuntu. After many years of offering bland, emotionless releases, we had a cautiously reasonable Yakkety Yak edition, so me hopes are high for today.

And for today, we will examine the latest Kubuntu, which officially bears the name of Zesty Zapus, but once again, like my recent Ubuntu review, my version of the distro's name is totally better. So allow me to ask thee, what is the answer to Linux, multiverse and constant forking?

Read more

Ubuntu 17.10 Won't Ship with Upstart and CGManager as Unity 8 Is Being Dropped

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical's Dimitri John Ledkov informs the Ubuntu Linux and Ubuntu Touch communities that the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system will drop support for the Upstart init daemon and CGManager project.

Read more

Canonical Releases Snapd 2.25 Snappy Daemon for Ubuntu Linux, Here Is What's New

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical's Snappy team, through Michael Vogt, announced today, April 28, 2017, the release and immediate availability of the Snapd 2.25 Snappy daemon for all supported Ubuntu Linux OSes, as well as other GNU/Linux distributions.

Read more

Ubuntu Devs Work on Rebasing Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) to Linux Kernel 4.11

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

It looks like the Ubuntu Kernel team is back at work after taking a short break, and they recently published another installation of their bi-weekly newsletter to inform the Ubuntu Linux community about what to expect in the coming weeks.

Read more

Leftovers: Debian and Ubuntu

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • CD/DVD Image Changes For The Upcoming Debian 9.0 Release

    With Debian 9.0 not being far away from releasing, the Debian CD Images Team has issued an update over their fundamental changes happening for this "Stretch" cycle.

  • The System76 'Galago Pro' laptop looks fantastic, $50 off for a few more days

    The Galago Pro looks like an incredibly stylish device ready for the masses with a slick aluminium casing, instead of the always cheap feeling plastic cases most tend to come with. It's slim, but best of all incredibly light for such a device at 1.3kg (2.87 lbs).

    It comes with Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS or Ubuntu 17.04, a speedy 7th Gen Intel in either an i5 7200U or i7 7500U and Intel® HD Graphics 620.

  • Download Ubuntu 17.10 daily builds

    The release schedule for Ubuntu 17.10 has been announced, and you can now download the daily build ISO images as well. Daily builds can be useful to watch the progress of Ubuntu 17.10, but are not recommended for normal usage due to possible bugs and changes.

GNOME/Unity in Ubuntu

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Supply Chain Case Study: Canonical and Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

I love talking about supply chain management in an open source software context, especially as it applies to managing collaborative processes between upstream projects and their downstream products. In the article linked above, I called out a couple of examples of supply chain management: an enterprise OpenStack distribution and a container management product utilizing Kubernetes and Docker for upstream platforms.

What about anti-patterns or things to avoid? There are several we could call out. At the risk of picking on someone I like, I’ll choose Canonical simply because they’ve been in the headlines recently for changes they’ve made to their organization, cutting back on some efforts and laying off some people. As I look at Canonical from a product offering perspective, there’s a lot they got right, which others could benefit from. But they also made many mistakes, some of which could have been avoided. First, the good.

Read more

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Snap creation tool 'snapcraft' has a new release with the groundwork for collaboration
  • Mobile Ubuntu Gamble to Fizzle Out in June
  • The Pop GTK Theme Brings Ubuntu with GNOME to Life

    If you’re looking to give your newly minted GNOME desktop a bit of a makeover look no further than the Pop GTK theme. Created by the popular Ubuntu computer seller System76, the Pop GTK theme puts a modern spin on the Ubuntu brown and orange colour scheme (which also happen to be the colours used in the System76 logo).

  • 2017 will be the year of the Linux desktop... for GNOME on Ubuntu

    A few weeks ago, Mark Shuttleworth, now CEO of Canonical, announced that the Unity desktop shell would be abandoned in favour of GNOME. While we were told that GNOME would be used by Ubuntu 18.04, we weren't sure whether it'd be included in Ubuntu 17.10, the next release. Following a meeting on IRC, we now know that GNOME will ship by default in the next release.

  • Ubuntu GNOME merged into mainline Ubuntu

    Ubuntu has been using the Unity environment developed by Caonical Ltd. since the netbook edition of Ubuntu 10.10, initially released on June 9, 2010. However, it has been decided that the Unity environment would no longer be the standard environment used for the popular GNU/Linux distro.

    In a blog post by Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Ubuntu and Canonical, he says, "We are wrapping up an excellent quarter and an excellent year for the company, with performance in many teams and products that we can be proud of. As we head into the new fiscal year, it’s appropriate to reassess each of our initiatives. I’m writing to let you know that we will end our investment in Unity8, the phone and convergence shell. We will shift our default Ubuntu desktop back to GNOME for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS."

Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) Linux OS Is Now Officially Open for Development

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical's Adam Conrad announced the other day that the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, due for release on October 19, 2017, is now officially open for development.

Read more

Also: Canonical Releases a Technology Preview of Ubuntu Server 17.04's New Installer

Canonical Outs Major Kernel Update to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, 10 Vulnerabilities Fixed

Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.29 Snap Creator Tool for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS & 17.04

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Desktop Themes

  • Numix White Icons Looks Better On Dark Themes, Install In Ubuntu/Linux Mint Via PPA
  • Make Your Gnome Shell Kind Of Look Like Unity With United Gnome Theme
    Beside theme you can install these extensions to make desktop look more like Unity. Dash to dock: Enable panel mode and position it on the left; Dynamic Panel Transparency: The non-dark variant comes with a semi-transparent panel. Square icons used in the following screenshots.
  • Albatross Theme Forked From Shimmer Project For Ubuntu/Linux Mint
    It is glad to see that theme development is much faster now than past. Albatross theme is forked from Shimmer project team, they stopped the development long ago. If you want to keep your desktop simple, clean and elegant then for sure this theme is for you, it is specially targeting Gnome desktop and may work with Xfce. Currently this theme is compatible with Gtk 3.24+/3.22/3.20. If you intend to use this theme in the Xfce desktop then you must use xfwm4 from "Greybird/Adwaita" since that is not packed with this theme. Since this theme is in active development, if you encounter any bug or problem with this theme then report it to get it fixed. Obsidian-1 icons used in the following screenshot.
  • Pop Theme Suite: Make Your Ubuntu/Linux Look Like System76 Upcoming Desktop
    As I mentioned in my previous posts that lots theme development going on now but Linux community and a company is not even behind called "System76". Well they designed theme and icons for their own computers that run Ubuntu but good news is that it is free and comes under GPL-V2 license that means anyone can copy, share or remake their theme suite.

Hands on with the Pinebook

The Pine A64 was a 64-bit Quad-Core Single Board Computer which was kickstarted at the tail end of 2015 for delivery in the middle of 2016. Costing just $15, and hailed as a “Raspberry Pi killer,” the board raised $1.7 million from 36,000 backers. It shipped to its backers to almost universally poor reviews. Now they’re back, this time with a laptop—a 11.6-inch model for $89, or a 14-inch model for $99. Both are powered by the same 64-bit Quad-Core ARM Cortex A53 as the original Pine A64 board, but at least Pine are doing a much better job this time around of managing user expectations. Read more

OpenELEC 8.0.3

Linux, Graphics, and Tonight's Release

  • Linux 4.11 Set To Be Released Today
    After it was postponed last weekend, the Linux 4.11 kernel is set to be officially released in a matter of hours. As of writing, the Linux 4.11 codename remains the "Fearless Coyote", but there is the possibility that Torvalds may rename it when tagging the official 4.11.0 release today.
  • Linux Kernel 3.18.51 Released with MIPS, ARM, and CIFS Changes, Updated Drivers
  • Linux Kernel 4.4.65 LTS Is a Small Patch with Networking and File System Fixes
  • USB Type-C Port Manager Coming To Linux 4.12
    Another feature to look forward to with the Linux 4.12 kernel for those using newer hardware featuring USB Type-C is a port manager. The "TCPM" driver is queued as a new staging driver via usb-next for entering the Linux 4.12 kernel in the next two weeks. This USB Type-C Port Manager driver implements a power delivery state machine for source/sink ports. This driver serves as a state machine while other USB Type-C drivers are responsible for the rest of the functionality.
  • DirectFB Is Back To Being Dormant
    Back in August of 2015, DirectFB disappeared with its project site and code vanishing. Last November DirectFB re-appeared along with a new site and renewed focus on the project. Unfortunately, it's once again gone silent. With all the news this month about Ubuntu dropping Mir / Unity 8 and the continued work by many different desktop/compositor teams on Wayland, I was curious this weekend to check on how DirectFB is doing in 2017... Sadly, DirectFB.net as the new DirectFB site launched last November is now down again. The original DirectFB (dot) org web-site remains squatted. I've been unable to find any other "new" DirectFB website.
  • Sway Wayland Compositor Adding Proprietary NVIDIA Driver Support
    The Sway Wayland compositor that aims to be i3-compatible continues picking up new features.