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Ubuntu

Canonical Releases Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Kernel Security Update for Raspberry Pi 2

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Earlier this week, Canonical released an important kernel security update for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, as well as other supported Ubuntu releases like Ubuntu 17.10, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, to address various vulnerabilities affecting the kernel packages for 64-bit machines, Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Google Cloud Platform (GCP) systems, and cloud environments.

Now, the same kernel patch that was made available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS users on 64-bit, AWS, GCP, and cloud environments is now available for Raspberry Pi 2 devices too, fixing an issue (CVE-2018-1092) in Linux kernel's EXT4 file system implementation discovered by Wen Xu, which could allow an attacker to crash the affected system by mounting a specially crafted EXT4 file system.

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Canonical Cuts Its Own Path To Put Linux In The Cloud

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
Ubuntu

Linux has gradually grown in importance along with the Internet and now the hyperscalers that define the next generation of experience on that global network. Most of the software running at the hyperscalers – with the exception of Microsoft, of course, is built upon Linux and other open source technologies. In turn, this means that Linux and open source have started to become more important in the enterprise arena, as trends such as cloud computing and large scale data analytics drove the need for similar technologies in the corporate datacenter.

Adapting the collection of open source packages that comprise a typical Linux build and making it suitable for enterprise consumption has led to carefully curated distributions that emphasise reliability and stability, plus paid technical support services and maintenance updates. These are typified by Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES), distributions that have a long product lifecycle of ten years and thirteen years, respectively.

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LTE-equipped automotive gateway runs Ubuntu on Bay Trail

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

Kontron’s rugged “EvoTrac G102” is an in-vehicle cellular gateway that runs Ubuntu on a quad-core Atom E3845, and offers 64GB eMMC, GbE, CAN, 2x USB, and a 3G/4G module with GPS.

Kontron unveiled the EvoTrac G102 last month, and earlier this month announced that it will act as the control box for Hyliion’s 6X4HE “intelligent electric hybrid system for Class 8 trucks and trailers.” The 6X4HE provides regenerative braking design to capture power for fuel savings of up to 30 percent,” says Kontron.

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Also: GPD Pocket 2 Launches This Summer with a Faster Processor

Canonical on So-called 'Private Cloud'

Filed under
Server
Ubuntu
  • 451 Research benchmarks public and private infrastructure cost

    451 Research’s latest report, ‘Busting the myth of private cloud economics ’, found that Canonical’s managed private OpenStack offering, BootStack, delivers private cloud with a TCO that matches public clouds. For multi-cloud operations, enterprise can benefit from a cost effective infrastructure by combining competitive public cloud services with Canonical’s managed private OpenStack cloud on-premise.

  • Private Cloud May Be the Best Bet: Report

    News flash: Private cloud economics can offer more cost efficiency than public cloud pricing structures.

    Private (or on-premises) cloud solutions can be more cost-effective than public cloud options, according to "Busting the Myths of Private Cloud Economics," a report 451 Research and Canonical released Wednesday. That conclusion counters the notion that public cloud platforms traditionally are more cost-efficient than private infrastructures.

    Half of the enterprise IT decision-makers who participated in the study identified cost as the No. 1 pain point associated with the public cloud. Forty percent mentioned cost-savings as a key driver of cloud migration.

    "We understand that people are looking for more cost-effective infrastructure. This was not necessarily news to us," said Mark Baker, program director at Canonical.

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Users Can Now Install Mesa 18.1.1 to Improve Their Linux Gaming

Filed under
Ubuntu

Implementing OpenGL 3.1 with ARB_compatibility on RadeonSI, r600, NV50, NVC0, Softpipe, LLVMpipe, and SVGA graphics drivers, the Mesa 18.1 graphics stack series debuted on May 18, 2018, with support for new OpenGL extensions, including GL_EXT_semaphore, GL_EXT_semaphore_fd, GL_ARB_bindless_texture, and GL_ARB_transform_feedback_overflow_query.

Additionally, it adds support for the GL_EXT_shader_framebuffer_fetch and GL_EXT_shader_framebuffer_fetch_non_coherent extension for the Intel i965 OpenGL graphics driver, support for the GL_KHR_blend_equation_advanced extension for the RadeonSI graphics driver, and enables disk shader cache support for the Intel i965 OpenGL graphics driver by default.

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RK3399 SBC has 9-36V DC and optional 4G, WiFi, serial, and HDMI-in modules

Filed under
Android
Ubuntu

ICNexus’ “SBC3100” SBC runs Ubuntu or Android on a Rockchip RK3399 with up to 4GB RAM and 16GB flash plus HDMI 2.0, DP, eDP, MIPI-DSI and -CSI, 9-36V power, optional WiFi/BT, and a mini-PCIe slot with optional 3G or 4G.

Taiwan-based ICNexus’ SBC3100 joins a growing list of SBCs that feature, the hhigh-end Rockchip RK3399 SoC, and like most, it taps the high-end SoC to provide an extensive feature list. Unlike most we’ve seen, however, it is not publicly priced and appears to be a proprietary product, such as Aaeon’s Pico-ITX based RICO-3399.

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Samsung 970 EVO NVMe SSD Benchmarks On Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Ubuntu

Last month Samsung introduced the 970 Series solid-state drives with the mainstream 970 EVO models and 970 PRO models for professionals/enthusiasts. The 970 Series moves to a 64-layer flash and uses a five-core Phoenix controller. For those curious about the Samsung 970 EVO performance under Linux, I have carried out some quick benchmarks to show off its potential under Ubuntu.

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Canonical Outs New Kernel Security Updates for All Supported Ubuntu Releases

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

The new kernel updates are available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating system series and address a total of nine security vulnerabilities affecting the kernels for 64-bit, 32-bit, Raspberry Pi 2, AWS, and GCP systems, as well as cloud environments.

They address a security issue (CVE-2018-1092 and CVE-2018-1093) affecting the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Ubuntu 17.10, and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS releases and discovered by Wen Xu in Linux kernel's EXT4 file system implementation, which could allow an attacker to crash the vulnerable system by causing a denial of service when mounting a specially crafted EXT4 file system.

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Devuan, Canonical and Ubuntu

Filed under
OS
Ubuntu
  • Devuan ships second stable cut of its systemd-free Linux

    Systemd-free Linux distro Devuan has released its stable Version 2.0.

    The project's last release candidate was released in May, and as you'd hope, not much has changed between then and full release.

    Because it's written by purists, we should include the full name of the release: it's Devuan GNU+Linux 2.0 ASCII Stable.

  • The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 531
  • Empowering developers to embrace Linux

     

    There is a huge opportunity for businesses to embrace new technologies and move their company forward. Open source and snaps are simple solutions, but ones that gives the most vital innovators in a business - developers - the tools they need to be confident in launching some of the world’s most utilised software.    

  • R 3.5.0 on Debian and Ubuntu: An Update

    R 3.5.0 was released a few weeks ago. As it changes some (important) internals, packages installed with a previous version of R have to be rebuilt. This was known and expected, and we took several measured steps to get R binaries to everybody without breakage.

    The question of but how do I upgrade without breaking my system was asked a few times, e.g., on the r-sig-debian list as well as in this StackOverflow question.

Mark Shuttleworth dishes on where Canonical and Ubuntu Linux are going next

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth looked good at OpenStack Summit in Vancouver. Not only were his company Canonical and operating system Ubuntu Linux doing well, but thanks to his microfasting diet, he's lost 40 pounds. Energized and feeling good, he's looking forward to taking Canonical to its initial public offering (IPO) in 2019 and making the company more powerful than ever.

It's taken him longer than expected to IPO Canonical. Shuttleworth explained, "We will do the right thing at the right time. That's not this year, though. There's a process that you have to go through and that takes time. We know what we need to hit in terms of revenue and growth and we're on track."

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More in Tux Machines

EXT4 fscrypt vs. eCryptfs vs. LUKS dm-crypt Benchmarks

Given the recent advancements of the EXT4 file-system with its native file-system encryption support provided by the fscrypt framework, here are benchmarks comparing the performance of an EXT4 file-system with no encryption, fscrypt-based encryption, eCryptfs-based encryption, and a LUKS dm-crypt encrypted volume. Read more

Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" Has Reached End of Security Support, Upgrade Now

Released more than three years ago, on April 25, 2015, Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" is currently considered the "oldstable" Debian branch since the release of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system series precisely a year ago, on June 17, 2017. As such, Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" has now reached end of life and will no longer receive regular security support beginning June 17, 2018. Security support for Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" will be handed over to the Debian LTS team now that LTS (Long Term Support) support has ended for Debian GNU/Linux 7 "Wheezy" on May 31, 2018. Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" will start receiving additional support from the Debian LTS project starting today, but only for a limited number of packages and architectures like i386, amd64, armel, and armhf. Read more

openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.17, KDE Plasma 5.13 Landed

As of today, the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system is now powered by the latest and most advanced Linux 4.17 kernel series, which landed in the most recent snapshot released earlier. Tumbleweed snapshot 20180615 was released today, June 17, 2018, and it comes only two days after snapshot 20180613, which added the Mesa 18.1.1 graphics stack and KDE Plasma 5.13 desktop environment, along with many components of the latest KDE Applications 18.04.2 software suite. Today's snapshot 20180615 continued upgrading the KDE Applications software suite to version 18.04.2, but it also upgraded the kernel from Linux 4.16.12 to Linux 4.17.1. As such, OpenSuSE Tumbleweed is now officially powered by Linux kernel 4.17, so upgrading your installs as soon as possible would be a good idea. Read more

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