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Ubuntu

Ubuntu and Derivatives

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Ubuntu
  • Canonical Sues Cloud Provider, Mint Beta, Devuan Tour

    Ubuntu parent-company, Canonical, today posted that they've been in a dispute with "a European cloud provider" over their use of their own homespun version of Ubuntu on their cloud servers. Their implementation disables even the most basic of security features and Canonical is worried something bad could happen and it'd reflect badly back on them. The post read, "The home-grown images of this provider disable fundamental security mechanisms and modify the system in ways that are unsupportable. They are likely to behave unpredictably on update in weirdly creative and mysterious ways." They said they've spent months trying to get the unnamed provider to use the standard Ubuntu as delivered to other commercial operations to no avail. Canonical feels they have no choice but to "take legal steps to remove these images." They're sure Red Hat and Microsoft wouldn't be treated like this.

  • Taking a stand against unofficial Ubuntu images

    Ubuntu is amazing on the cloud because we work with cloud providers to ensure crisp, consistent and secure images which you can auto-update safely. On every major cloud—AWS, Azure, Google, Rackspace, SoftLayer and many more—you can be confident that ‘Ubuntu’ is Ubuntu, with the same commitment to quality that you can expect when you install it yourself, and we can guarantee that to you because we require that clouds offer only certified Ubuntu images.

  • Canonical Takes Stand Against Unofficial Ubuntu Images, Reportedly Risky & Insecure

    Mark Shuttleworth has written a new blog post where he's outlining a dispute Canonical is having with a European cloud provider over a breach of contract and "publishing insecure, broken images of Ubuntu" for its cloud customers.

    With these Ubuntu Cloud unofficial images reportedly being buggy, users are complaining to Canonical/Ubuntu, assuming it's an upstream issue. Having enough of that, they are now preparing for legal steps to remove the unofficial Ubuntu images from the particular cloud provider.

  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” MATE – BETA Release
  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” Cinnamon – BETA Release

Ubuntu Derivatives

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Trisquel GNU/Linux 8 Alpha Is Now Available to Download

    Trisquel GNU/Linux 8.0 alpha is now available for download and testing. Based on Ubuntu 16.04, Trisquel 8.0 also ships with the MATE 1.12 desktop.

  • Linux Mint 18.1 Beta released

    Well,Just months back Linux Mint 18 got it's release,now it is the time to have the next point release of Linux Mint 18.Just few hours ago Linux Mint team has announced the availability of Linux Mint 18.1 Beta.
    As Linux Mint users , who have already moved to Linux Mint 18, might be loving it for the newly introduced themes,look & feel and features(of course,they didn't go like updating only pre-installed packages Tongue ).So,in this time, coming from rainy to winter season,they have made a good list of new improvements,features and support.

  • Linux Mint 18.1 Beta Is Out with Cinnamon 3.2 & MATE 1.16, Based on Ubuntu 16.04

    A few moments ago, Linux Mint project leader Clement Lefebvre proudly announced the release and immediate availability of the Beta version of the upcoming Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena."

Ubuntu still isn't free software

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Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth just blogged about their stance against unofficial Ubuntu images. The assertion is that a cloud hoster is providing unofficial and modified Ubuntu images, and that these images are meaningfully different from upstream Ubuntu in terms of their functionality and security. Users are attempting to make use of these images, are finding that they don't work properly and are assuming that Ubuntu is a shoddy product. This is an entirely legitimate concern, and if Canonical are acting to reduce user confusion then they should be commended for that.

The appropriate means to handle this kind of issue is trademark law. If someone claims that something is Ubuntu when it isn't, that's probably an infringement of the trademark and it's entirely reasonable for the trademark owner to take action to protect the value associated with their trademark. But Canonical's IP policy goes much further than that - it can be interpreted as meaning[1] that you can't distribute works based on Ubuntu without paying Canonical for the privilege, even if you call it something other than Ubuntu.

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Canonical Releases New Kernel Live Patch Security Update for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

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Ubuntu

On November 30, 2016, after publishing new kernel updates for all of its supported Ubuntu Linux releases, Canonical, through Luis Henriques, announced the availability of the second kernel live patch security update to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

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Also: Four New Kernel Vulnerabilities Patched in All Supported Ubuntu OSes, Update Now

Ubuntu-Based Trisquel GNU/Linux 8.0 "Flidas" Enters Development with MATE 1.12.1

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Ubuntu

The development team behind Trisquel GNU/Linux, a 100% libre distribution based on the Ubuntu Linux operating system, announced the availability of the first Alpha images for the upcoming Trisquel GNU/Linux 8.0 release.

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Devuan and Ubuntu

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • New Devuan Beta, Sharket Mare, 2016 Predictions

    Not even 24 hours after my saying there hasn't been a new Devuan release since April, the project released Beta 2 for 32 and 64-bit machines. Elsewhere, Jeremy Garcia celebrates 16 years of LinuxQuestions.org and writer-blogger Bruce Byfield today said that Linux and its application are commercial grade despite what some may think. The Ubuntu 17.04 release schedule was posted and Canonical has approved Snaps sans dependencies.

  • Systemd-Free Debian Fork Devuan Releases Its Second Beta
  • Docker and Canonical partner on CS Docker Engine for millions of Ubuntu users
  • Docker, Canonical Team Up on CS Docker Engine for Ubuntu

    When it comes to containers, Canonical has been early to make many of the right moves. The company was one one of the first to weave in platform support for Docker, which is partly significant because the majority of OpenStack deployments are built on Ubuntu.

    Now, Docker and Canonical have announced an integrated Commercially Supported (CS) Docker Engine offering on Ubuntu, meant to provide Canonical customers with a single path for support of the Ubuntu operating system and CS Docker Engine in enterprise Docker operations.

  • Ubuntu devs can now build Snaps without dependencies

    To encourage app distribution advancements, Canonical is now letting Ubuntu app developers build their Snaps without bundling their dependencies. The new support comes through the ubuntu-app-platform snap that has just been reached the Ubuntu Software store.

Canonical offers direct Docker support to Ubuntu users

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Ubuntu

Enterprise Ubuntu users running Docker in production now have a new source for Docker support: from Canonical.

Earlier today, Canonical and Docker announced joint support for the commercial edition of Docker Engine on Ubuntu. The pair also will provide updates for Docker on Ubuntu through an application delivery system Canonical originally devised.

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Ubuntu 17.04 ‘Zesty Zapus’ Details

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Ubuntu

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian Project News - November 28th, 2016

    Welcome to this year's fourth issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community.

  • 4 Snap Apps You Can Install on Ubuntu Right Now

    In the mood to read a quick round-up of a some popular desktop Linux apps that are now available to install as Snappy apps?

    Me too, so I wrote one.

    For the purposes of this post (read: cos i’m lazy) you won’t find apps that are not intended to be distributed widely listed (i.e. apps which require an argument to be passed to install them, like Dekko, LibreOffice, and others).

    If you’re on a metered internet connection (or subsisting on a slow one) installing apps as Snaps probably isn’t the most effective use of your bandwidth. Until Snap frameworks (or whatever Canonical calls Snap dependencies) arrive most Snaps that you install are bundled with everything needed to run.

  • Ubuntu Prepping Its 16.04 "Rolling HWE Kernel"

    Similar to past Ubuntu LTS (Long Term Support) releases, Ubuntu 16.04.2 and beyond will feature hardware enablement kernels back-ported from newer Ubuntu releases in order to allow new hardware to work on these older LTS releases, but now the Xenial Xerus is switching to a concept of a "rolling HWE kernel."

    Canonical's Leann Ogasawara describes the rolling HWE kernel as, "The biggest change is that we are moving to what we refer to as a "rolling HWE kernel" model. Essentially, consumers of an HWE kernel will automatically be upgraded to the next HWE kernel offered in subsequent point releases until reaching the final HWE Kernel offered in 16.04.5." So it's really not like a true rolling Linux kernel, just that you will automatically be upgraded to future HWE kernels with future LTS point releases. It's documented more at this Wiki page.

Ubuntu 17.04 Slated for Release on April 13, 2017, Final Beta Lands March 23

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Ubuntu

Today we have some great news for our Ubuntu Linux readers, as Canonical recently published the release schedule for the upcoming Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system.

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Also: Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Lands January 19, 2017, with Ubuntu 16.10's Linux 4.8 Kernel

You Can Now Package Your Apps as Snaps without Bundling Their Dependencies

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Development News

  • KDevelop 5.0.3 Open-Source IDE Improves GitHub Handling Authentication, More
    The development behind the open-source and cross-platform KDevelop IDE (Integrated Development Environment) was proud to announce on the first day of December the availability of the third point release for KDevelop 5.0 stable series. KDevelop 5.0.3 arrives one and a half months after the second maintenance update, but it's a small bugfix release that attempts to patch a total of nine issues reported by users since then. However, it's a recommended update for all users. "We are happy to announce the release of KDevelop 5.0.3, the third bugfix and stabilization release for KDevelop 5.0. An upgrade to 5.0.3 is strongly recommended to all users of 5.0.0, 5.0.1 or 5.0.2," reads the release announcement.
  • PHP 7.1.0
    The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 7.1.0.
  • PHP 7.1 Makes Its Debut
    This first major update to last year's huge PHP 7.0 release builds several new features on top. Introduced by PHP 7.1 is nullable types, a void return type, a iterable pseudo-type, class constant visibility modifiers, support for catching multiple exception types, and many other language enhancements plus more performance optimizations and other work.

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OSS Leftovers