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Ubuntu

OpenStack Juno is out, Debian (and Ubuntu Trusty ports) packages ready

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Debian
Ubuntu

This is just a quick announce: Debian packages for Juno are out. In fact, they were ready the day of the release, on the 16th of October. I uploaded it all (to Experimental) the same day, literally a few hours after the final released was git tagged. But I had no time to announce it.

This week-end, I took the time to do an Ubuntu Trusty port, which I also publish (it’s just a mater of rebuilding all, and it should work out of the box). Here are the backports repositories. For Wheezy:

deb http://archive.gplhost.com/debian juno-backports main

deb http://archive.gplhost.com/debian juno main

For trusty:

deb http://archive.gplhost.com/debian trusty-juno-backports main

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Ubuntu Touch RTM Update Is Out, Has Better Performance and Beautiful New Indicators

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu developers had some minor problems in the week before with all sorts of bugs that were popping out. They postponed the release of a new update for the Ubuntu Touch RTM and, at one point, they even got everyone to focus on fixing the problems and nothing else. Now they have a new version out and progress really shows.

Users who already have Ubuntu Touch on their phones might have noticed that the number of features added to the system have diminished drastically, but that's the way it should be. The system is getting closer to its final stages and there is little reason to add new options now. The current form of the OS is not very far from the official release, so only fixes remain to be made.

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Ubuntu turns 10: A look back at desktop Linux standard bearer

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Ubuntu

Tech pundits differ, to say the least, on a lot of topics in the world of free and open-source software, but it’s inarguable that Ubuntu has been the most influential Linux desktop distribution of the past decade. On the occasion of its 10th anniversary, here’s a brief look back.

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V is for Vivid

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Ubuntu

Release week! Already! I wouldn’t call Trusty ‘vintage’ just yet, but Utopic is poised to leap into the torrent stream. We’ve all managed to land our final touches to *buntu and are excited to bring the next wave of newness to users around the world. Glad to see the unicorn theme went down well, judging from the various desktops I see on G+.

And so it’s time to open the vatic floodgates and invite your thoughts and contributions to our soon-to-be-opened iteration next. Our ventrous quest to put GNU as you love it on phones is bearing fruit, with final touches to the first image in a new era of convergence in computing. From tiny devices to personal computers of all shapes and sizes to the ventose vistas of cloud computing, our goal is to make a platform that is useful, versal and widely used.

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UNITY PRIVACY INDICATOR 0.4 RELEASED WITH NEW PRIVACY SETTINGS

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

For those not familiar with Privacy Indicator, this is an Ubuntu AppIndicator especially created for Unity, which allows you to control various privacy aspects.

Until this release, the indicator could be used to enable / disable Dash online search results and Zeitgeist logging (and also clear the Zeitgeist log), clear recently used files (which show up in the Nautilus or Nemo "Recent" sidebar item for instance) and to show or hide your real name on the Unity panel.

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Ubuntu Turns 10, Happy Birthday!

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Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth announced Ubuntu 4.10 "The Warty Warthog Release" on October 20, 2004. It's hard to believe that a decade has passed since then, but we are now getting ready for Ubuntu 14.10 "Utopic Unicorn."

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Ubuntu 14.10 "Utopic Unicorn" Arrives in a Few Days

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Ubuntu

When Ubuntu hits the Final Freeze point the developers stop pushing updates and changes, and everyone focuses on the major bugs and problems that haven't been fixed yet. An exception can be made if something really terrible happens, but that wasn't the case until now and it's unlikely to occur.

Now, Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) is scheduled to arrive on October 23, this Thursday. Users will be offered the chance to upgrade their systems, but this is an intermediary release and it's not likely that many users will take this step. The Ubuntu LTS release was just six months ago and not too many users are going to exchange the five years of support for 14.04 with just nine months for 14.10.

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Meizu MX4 Pro Spotter Running Ubuntu Touch

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Ubuntu

For now, we don’t know which device will be running Ubuntu Touch, but due to the fact that Meizu MX4 Pro has been postponed to November, it may be it. The MX4 Pro uses a 5.4 inch display with 1536 x 2560 resilution, a 20 MPX rear camera + a 13 MPX front camera, a Samsung octa-core Exynos 5430 CPU and 3 GB of RAM.

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Unity Celebrated Its 4th Birthday At The Beginning Of This Week

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Ubuntu

For those users who are new to Ubuntu, Canonical has replaced GNOME with Unity starting with Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal. But the first Unity based Ubuntu system was Ubuntu 10.10 Netbook Remix, a special flavor for netbooks.

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Also: Ubuntu 15.10 Might Be The First Unity 8 Based Ubuntu Desktop System

INTERVIEW: THOMAS VOSS OF MI

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

Not since the days of 2004, when X.org split from XFree86, have we seen such exciting developments in the normally prosaic realms of display servers. These are the bits that run behind your desktop, making sure Gnome, KDE, Xfce and the rest can talk to your graphics hardware, your screen and even your keyboard and mouse. They have a profound effect on your system’s performance and capabilities. And where we once had one, we now have two more – Wayland and Mir, and both are competing to win your affections in the battle for an X replacement.

We spoke to Wayland’s Daniel Stone in issue 6 of Linux Voice, so we thought it was only fair to give equal coverage to Mir, Canonical’s own in-house X replacement, and a project that has so far courted controversy with some of its decisions. Which is why we headed to Frankfurt and asked its Technical Architect, Thomas Voß, for some background context…

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