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Ubuntu

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Snap creation tool 'snapcraft' has a new release with the groundwork for collaboration
  • Mobile Ubuntu Gamble to Fizzle Out in June
  • The Pop GTK Theme Brings Ubuntu with GNOME to Life

    If you’re looking to give your newly minted GNOME desktop a bit of a makeover look no further than the Pop GTK theme. Created by the popular Ubuntu computer seller System76, the Pop GTK theme puts a modern spin on the Ubuntu brown and orange colour scheme (which also happen to be the colours used in the System76 logo).

  • 2017 will be the year of the Linux desktop... for GNOME on Ubuntu

    A few weeks ago, Mark Shuttleworth, now CEO of Canonical, announced that the Unity desktop shell would be abandoned in favour of GNOME. While we were told that GNOME would be used by Ubuntu 18.04, we weren't sure whether it'd be included in Ubuntu 17.10, the next release. Following a meeting on IRC, we now know that GNOME will ship by default in the next release.

  • Ubuntu GNOME merged into mainline Ubuntu

    Ubuntu has been using the Unity environment developed by Caonical Ltd. since the netbook edition of Ubuntu 10.10, initially released on June 9, 2010. However, it has been decided that the Unity environment would no longer be the standard environment used for the popular GNU/Linux distro.

    In a blog post by Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Ubuntu and Canonical, he says, "We are wrapping up an excellent quarter and an excellent year for the company, with performance in many teams and products that we can be proud of. As we head into the new fiscal year, it’s appropriate to reassess each of our initiatives. I’m writing to let you know that we will end our investment in Unity8, the phone and convergence shell. We will shift our default Ubuntu desktop back to GNOME for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS."

Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) Linux OS Is Now Officially Open for Development

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Ubuntu

Canonical's Adam Conrad announced the other day that the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, due for release on October 19, 2017, is now officially open for development.

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Also: Canonical Releases a Technology Preview of Ubuntu Server 17.04's New Installer

Canonical Outs Major Kernel Update to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, 10 Vulnerabilities Fixed

Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.29 Snap Creator Tool for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS & 17.04

Ubuntu 17.10 Codename Released "Artful Aardvark"

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Ubuntu

Recently Ubuntu has been the talk of the town due to Mark shuttleworth's announcement on discontinuation of Unity 8 development. But the release of Ubuntu 17.04 also fills some gap of that talk shows. Now there is another news coming from Ubuntu which is the release of codename of its upcoming Ubuntu version, i.e. Ubuntu 17.10. It's ​Artful Aardvark! Yes. Artful Aardvark. But what does it mean? Let's find out.

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Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) Daily Build ISO Images Now Available to Download

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Ubuntu

Canonical's Adam Conrad announced that Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) is officially open for development, and it looks like the first daily build ISO images are already available for download.

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12 Features That Made Unity The Best Linux Desktop

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Ubuntu

There I said it. So, naturally, I am feeling a little sad that Unity is retiring from its role as the default Ubuntu desktop. It will be replaced by (the also-awesome) GNOME Shell in Ubuntu 17.10 onwards.

For the past 6 and a half years I, like millions of Ubuntu users, have been able to rely on Unity. From Qml to Compiz, from controversy to controversy, the Unity desktop has held firm. As (arguably) the one element that helped to define and mould the Ubuntu identity it’s only natural that one wonders what Ubuntu is without it.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

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Debian
Ubuntu

Lessons learned from the failure of Ubuntu Touch

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Ubuntu

With the death of yet another open source/free software/Linux-based mobile platform, Ubuntu Touch, clearly it is time for us to sit down and have a frank discussion about what we in the free software world can reasonably accomplish in a mobile platform.

One of the biggest issues—if not THE biggest issue—with Ubuntu Touch was that it simply had goals that were far too aggressive to reasonably achieve. It suffered from the all-too-common malady known in software development as feature creep.

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City Cloud gets Ubuntu Certified

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Ubuntu

European Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) provider City Network, has joined the Ubuntu Certified Public Cloud (CPC) programme. This is the second very big European win for Ubuntu after it signed up OVH earlier this month. As an Ubuntu CPC partner, City Cloud will no longer need to create, curate, patch and maintain Ubuntu images. This will all be done by Ubuntu who will then provide them to City Network.

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Ubuntu Images for Oracle

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Server
Ubuntu
  • Certified Ubuntu Images available on Oracle Bare Metal Cloud Service

    Certified Ubuntu images are now available in the Oracle Bare Metal Cloud Services, providing developers with compute options ranging from single to 16 OCPU virtual machines (VMs) to high-performance, dedicated bare metal compute instances. This is in addition to the image already offered on Oracle Compute Cloud Service and maintains the ability for enterprises to add Canonical-backed Ubuntu Advantage Support and Systems Management. Oracle and Canonical customers now have access to the latest Ubuntu features, compliance accreditations and security updates.

  • Canonical's Certified Ubuntu Images Land in Oracle's Bare Metal Cloud Service

    Canonical announced the official availability of Certified Ubuntu images in Oracle's Bare Metal Cloud Services, which accompany the images that the company already provides in the Oracle Compute Cloud Service.

    Canonical's Certified Ubuntu images in Oracle Bare Metal Cloud Services are a great addition because they promise to provide developers with dedicated, high-performance bare-metal compute instances, as well as virtual machines with up to 16 Oracle Compute Unit (OCPU). They also add the ability for Oracle's enterprise customers to access the latest and greatest Ubuntu features.

Ubuntu 17.04: Unity's swan song?

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Reviews
Ubuntu

For the most part, not much has changed on Ubuntu's Desktop edition in the past year. Unity 7 has more or less remained the same while work was progressing on the next version of the desktop, Unity 8. However, now that both desktops are being retired in favour of the GNOME desktop, running Ubuntu 17.04 feels a bit strange. This week I was running software that has probably reached the end of its life and this version of Ubuntu will only be supported for nine months. I could probably get the same desktop experience and most of the same hardware support running Ubuntu 16.04 and get security updates through to 2021 in the bargain. In short, I don't think Ubuntu 17.04 offers users anything significant over last year's 16.04 LTS release and it will be retired sooner.

That being said, I could not help but be a little wistful about using Unity 7 again. Even though it has been about a year since I last used Unity, I quickly fell back into the routine and I was once more reminded how pleasant it can be to use Unity. The desktop is geared almost perfectly to my workflow and the controls are set up in a way that reduces my mouse usage to almost nothing. I find Unity a very comfortable desktop to use, especially when application menus have been moved from the top panel to inside their own windows. While there are some projects trying to carry on development of Unity, this release of Ubuntu feels like Unity's swan song and I have greatly enjoyed using the desktop this week.

While there is not much new in Ubuntu 17.04, the release is pretty solid. Apart from the confusion that may arise from having three different package managers, I found Ubuntu to be capable, fairly newcomer friendly and stable. Everything worked well for me, at least on physical hardware. Unity is a bit slow to use in a virtual machine, but the distribution worked smoothly on my desktop computer.

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