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Ubuntu

Kubuntu 17.10 review - Hello darkness my old friend

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KDE
Reviews
Ubuntu

This must be one of the worst Kubuntu releases I've tried in a long time. Part of the fault lies with the parent distro, and the heartless switch to Gnome, which just shows that the passion to making Ubuntu an important desktop player is gone. This is just inertia and apathy. Still, there's so much wrong with Kubuntu on its own that I feel like a total fool for investing my time in this effort. And it also proves that there is only one good release for every three, showing that distro teams are overstretched roughly by 300%. The whole fast-release bullshit is just the modern-era agile-crap nonsense. It helps no one. Shitty products serve no purpose. Being fast for the sake of it is like running head first into an industrial blender to have your outstretched arms finely chopped by spinning blades.

Kubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark makes me sad. Makes me angry. Zesty was one of the finest distros ever created. This is one of the worst. That makes no sense. How can it be? Where's the modicum of care and diligence to ensure this kind of stuff does not happen? Application crashes, kernel crashes, media bugs, weird artifacts. Horrible.

My suggestion is not to upgrade for now. And even then, the foundation of your sanity is shaken. Come the upgrade, you do not know what will happen. You're hostage to arbitrary code decisions. There's no peace and stability in the Linux desktop. You will always have to dread the update process, not knowing what will break next. That is the essence of amateurism. And I'm right there, advocating Plasma and Kubuntu like the biggest of fools in this universe. Anyway, for the sake of public sacrifice, I'll also check 17.10 in-vivo upgrades on other machines, but my expectations are low. Aardvark gets 4/10. Don't bother for now, give it six months for the bugs to be fixed before a new release erases the slate and the cycle of depression starts again.

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Also: First Look At Linux Mint 18.3 Sylvia Beta

Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS Will Bring Undecorated Maximized Windows for Mutiny Layout

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Ubuntu

First off, the development of Ubuntu MATE 18.04 starts based on the core components of its bigger brother, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, such as the Linux 4.13 kernel, X.Org Server 1.19 display server, Mesa 17.1 graphics stack, and many of the latest security patches from upstream, a.k.a. Debian Testing (Buster) repositories.

And now for the goodies coming to the final Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS release next year, as Martin Wimpress and his team promise to bring hardware acceleration to Marco, MATE desktop environment's default window manager, as well as undecorated windows for the Mutiny layout for ex-Unity users.

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ExLight Linux Distro Now Based on Ubuntu 17.10, Features Enlightenment Desktop

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Ubuntu

ExLight Build 171112 is the latest update to the Linux distro, which is based on the recently released Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, but also borrows some package from the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" repositories (a.k.a. Debian Testing).

The biggest change in this release is the replacement of the Linux 4.9 LTS kernel used in previous versions of the distribution with the more recent Linux 4.13 kernel series. ExLight Build 171112 runs a specially crafted kernel 4.13.0-16-exton based on upstream's Linux 4.13.4 kernel.

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Wandboard.org launches i.MX8M-based SBC with RPi expansion

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Android
Linux
Ubuntu

Technexion’s Wandboard.org unveiled open source “Wand-Pi-8M” SBCs that run Linux on a quad-A53 i.MX8M, and offer WiFi/BT, GbE, HDMI 2.0, and a 40-pin RPi link.

Technexion and its Wandboard.org community project opened pre-orders on three successors to its i.MX6 based Wandboard and almost identical Wandboard Reload SBCs that tap NXP’s long awaited, quad-core, Cortex-A53 i.MX8M SoC. Unlike the Wandboards, the smaller, Raspberry Pi like (85 x 56 x 19.3mm) Wand-Pi-8M-Lite ($89), Wand-Pi-8M-Pro ($99), and Wand-Pi-8M-Deluxe ($119), are standard SBCs rather than sandwich-style COM-and-carrier products. The boards ship in Spring 2018.

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Canonical Development News

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Ubuntu

Debian/Ubuntu Derivatives: Elive 2.9.16, Deepin 15.5, Pop!_OS

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Elive 2.9.16 beta released

    The Elive Team is proud to announce the release of the beta version 2.9.16
    This new version includes:

    Performance is now almost twice as responsive and smoother, videos also plays faster
    Designs improved buttons, window borders, and faster effects
    Desktop automatic scaling, font selection and sizing based on your screen, organization of elements are more accessible too
    Installer has a lot of improvements, fixes, fine-tuning and options to choice for the installed system, included privative drivers like Nvidia / Ati

  • Deepin 15.5 Linux OS Promises New Security Features, Extra Desktop Functionality

    The developers of the Deepin Linux operating system announced today the availability of the first beta release of Deepin 15.5, the next maintenance update to the stable series.

    Continuing to provide the Linux community with one of the most beautiful, safe, reliable, and easy to use computer operating system, Deepin 15.5 entered beta today with a bunch of new security features, such as support for importing and exporting VPN (Virtual Private Network) profiles and an application proxy function.

    The application proxy function works by allowing the user to open a certain program that requires an Internet connection through the system-wide, default proxy server. All you have to do is to right-click on an app's shortcut and choose the new "Open by proxy" option from the context menu.

  • Pop!_OS Has Arrived: How Does It Compare to Ubuntu?

    System76 is one of the most well-known hardware companies in the free and open source software world. That’s not to say the brand is by any means a household name. Nonetheless, System76 has been selling computers that run Ubuntu for over a decade. That’s why the company made news when it announced that it would provide its own Linux-based operating system, Pop!_OS.

    In the past few weeks, the first official release of Pop!_OS became available for download. Now it’s shipping as an option on new computers from System76. Should you check it out?

Ubuntu 17.10 Review – For The Record

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Reviews
Ubuntu

So who is the target user base for Ubuntu 17.10? As much as I’d like to say newbies, I simply can’t do that. The help tool is very newbie friendly and would do well to have a variation on other GNOME-based distros. But GNOME 3 itself, even with Ubuntu development tweaks, is simply not going to win over someone used to a traditional menu layout.

That said, I can say that while I still dislike the handling of GNOME extensions, indicators and other desktop elements, Ubuntu 17.10 is lightning fast, stable and has the basics in place to get the job done for most people used to a Linux desktop.

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Dell Rolling Out More Developer-Focused Systems Preloaded With Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

Canonical has announced that Dell is rolling out five new systems pre-installed with Ubuntu Linux. These systems are catering towards developers and come from all-in-one computers to new laptop models.

Canonical just posted about five new Dell systems with Ubuntu pre-installed. Details are light as the Dell.com web-site is still reflecting these devices with Windows 10 on some of the pages and no mentions of these new models yet on the other general Dell Linux areas.

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Original: New Dell Precision Machines Available With Ubuntu Pre-Installed

Ubuntu Devs Want to Know How You Feel About Guest Sessions in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

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Ubuntu

Canonical kicked off development of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) at the end of October with a focus on improving the overall stability and reliability of the operating system, being the next long-term supported release and all that. But they also plan on implementing some highly requested features, and one of these is guest sessions.

Software engineer Robert Ancell posted an announcement today on the community hub to get the pulse of the Ubuntu community and how they feel about guest sessions in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS. If you're not aware, Canonical had to remove guest session support in Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) due to the switch to the GNOME desktop and its GDM login manager.

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Samsung’s Linux on Galaxy software will bring full-fledged Ubuntu desktop to your phone (with an external display)

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Ubuntu

Samsung’s DeX dock lets you connect one of the company’s recent phones to an external display, mouse, and keyboard to use your phone like a desktop PC… assuming you’re comfortable with a desktop PC that runs Android.

But soon you may also be able to use your Android phone as a Linux PC. Samsung recently unveiled plans for “Linux on Galaxy,” promising that you’d be able to run a full-fledged Linux environment on a phone hooked up to a DeX dock.

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The power of open source: Why GitLab's move to a Developer Certificate of Origin benefits the developer community

Over the past few years, open source software has transformed the way enterprises operate and ship code. In an era where companies are striving to deliver the next best application, enterprises are turning to the sea of open source contributors to create projects faster and more effectively than ever before. For instance, 65 percent of companies surveyed in The Black Duck Future of Open Source Survey reveal they are contributing to open source projects – with 59 percent doing so to gain a competitive edge. As open source continues to have a positive influence on software development, it’s important for developers to continue to participate in and contribute to open source projects. Read more