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Ubuntu

Ubuntu: Data Collection, a Decade at Canonical, Xubuntu 18.04 Community Wallpaper Contest

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Ubuntu
  • Canonical wants Ubuntu to collect your personal data

    This has gone down like a bucket of cold sick with Linux users. After all, this is the sort of thing that Microsoft does and is precisely the sort of thing that they hate about Windows 10.

  • 10 Amazing Years of Ubuntu and Canonical

    10 years ago today, I joined Canonical, on the very earliest version of the Ubuntu Server Team!

    And in the decade since, I've had the tremendous privilege to work with so many amazing people, and the opportunity to contribute so much open source software to the Ubuntu ecosystem.

  • Xubuntu 18.04 community wallpaper contest

    We’re on our way to the 18.04 LTS release and it’s time for another community wallpaper contest!

Canonical/Ubuntu: Minimalism, Unity, and Snapcraft

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Adds New “Minimal Installation” Option For Fewer Preinstalled Packages

    The development of the next Ubuntu LTS release, i.e., Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver, is going on in full swing. The desktop development team has decided to add a new option in the installation process that allows you to perform a lean installation of Ubuntu.

  • Unity 7.4.5 Released for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

    The Unity 7.4.5 update isn’t big on new features but it is big on bug fixes and general all-round improvements.

  • Snapcraft through the eyes of it’s biggest community contributor

    If you’ve spent any time in the Snapcraft forum, it’s quite likely you’ve come across Dan Llewellyn – a keen community advocate or self-proclaimed Snapcrafter. Dan has always had a passion for computing and is completely self-taught. Outside of the community, Dan is a freelance WordPress developer. After getting into the open source world around 1998, he has switched between various Linux distros including Suse, RedHat, Gentoo before settling on Ubuntu from the 5.04 release onwards. A longtime participant in the UK Ubuntu chatroom – where he met Canonical’s Alan Pope – Dan admits he was never that active before Snapcraft came along.

    It was spending time in the UK chatroom around 2016 that he discovered snaps which piqued his interest. “I saw the movement of changing Clicks to snaps and thought it was an interesting idea. It’s more widely focused than a mobile app delivery system and I’ve always liked things that also worked on the server, IoT and elsewhere” Dan comments. With a previous desire to get into mobile app development and seeing the move away from Ubuntu Touch, Dan was eager to see Snapcraft succeed and felt like it was something he could contribute to.

Canonical Under Fire for Ubuntu Data Collection

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu wants to slurp PCs' vital statistics – even location – with new desktop installs

    "We want to be able to focus our engineering efforts on the things that matter most to our users, and in order to do that we need to get some more data about sort of setups our users have and which software they are running on it," explained Will Cooke, the director of Ubuntu Desktop at Canonical.

    To gather that information Cooke proposed adding a checkbox to the Ubuntu installer that says something like "Send diagnostics information to help improve Ubuntu". "This would be checked by default" Cooke wrote.

  • Ubuntu Gets in the User Data Collection Business

    Canonical announced plans to roll out a user data and diagnostics collection system with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver). This new system will collect data on the user's OS details, hardware setup, apps and OS settings.

    "We want to be able to focus our engineering efforts on the things that matter most to our users, and in order to do that we need to get some more data about sort of setups our users have and which software they are running on it," said Will Cooke, Director of Ubuntu Desktop at Canonical.

Debian and Canonical’s Juju

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Everything about the Mini-DebConf in Hamburg in May 2018

    With great joy we are finally offically announcing the Debian MiniDebConf which will take place in Hamburg (Germany) from May 16 to 20, with three days of Debcamp style hacking, followed by two days of talks, workshops and more hacking. And then, Monday the 21st is also a holiday in Germany, so you might choose to extend your stay by a day! (Though there will not be an official schedule for the 21st.)

  • Xerox printers on Debian - an update

    I think the lamest part of my current job is that we heavily rely on multifunction printers. We need to print a high volume of complicated documents on demand. You know, 1500 copies of a color booklet printed on 11x17 paper folded in 3 stapled in the middle kind of stuff.

    Pardon my French, but printers suck big time. The printer market is an oligopoly clusterfuck and it seems it keeps getting worse (looking at you, Fuji-Xerox merger). None of the drivers support Linux properly, all the printers are big piles of proprietary code and somehow the corporations selling them keep adding features no one needs.

  • Debian won Linux Journal's Readers' Choice Award for Best Linux Distribution!
  • Storage Made Easy adds Charm to Canonical’s Juju ecosystem

Canonical: Ubuntu 18.04 Will Collect Data, Adds 'Minimal iInstall', MAAS, Mesa, GLVND

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Ubuntu

Canonical Wants to Collect Some Data from Ubuntu Users to Improve New Releases

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Ubuntu

The information Canonical's Ubuntu Desktop engineers need to improve certain aspects of the Linux-based operating system about includes users' setups, installed software, Ubuntu flavor and version, network connectivity, CPU family, RAM, disk size, screen resolution, GPU vendor and model, as well as OEM manufacturer.

In addition, the company says that it needs to know your location, yet it promises to not store IP addresses of users. Other information that would be collected includes total installation time, automatic login info, selected disk layout, LivePatch enablement, and if you choose to install updates or third-party software during installation.

Read more

Also: Canonical Plans to Release Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS (Xenial Xerus) on March 1, 2018

Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS Planned For Release 1 March

Ubuntu Wants To Collect Data About Your System–Starting From 18.04 LTS

i.MX6 UL based COM/SBC hybrid has FPGA with programmable ZPU core

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Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

Technologic’s rugged, open-spec “TS-4100” COM/SBC hybrid runs Linux on an i.MX6 UL, and offers a microSD slot, 4GB eMMC, a micro-USB OTG port, optional WiFi/BT and baseboard, and an FPGA with a programmable ZPU core for offloading real-time tasks.

Technologic Systems has begun sampling its first i.MX6 UL (UltraLite) based board, which is also its first computer-on-module that can double as an SBC. The 75 x 55mm TS-4100 module features a microSD slot, onboard eMMC, a micro-USB OTG port with power support, and optional WiFi and Bluetooth. Like most Technologic boards, such as the popular, i.MX6-based TS-4900 module, it offers long-term support and -40 to 85°C support, and ships with schematics and open source Linux images (Ubuntu 16.04 and Debian Jesse).

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Debian and Ubuntu: Readers' Choice Awards, Reproducible Builds, LXD, Servers and Ubuntu LoCo Council

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Best Linux Distribution

    This year we're breaking up our Readers' Choice Awards by category, so check back weekly for a new poll on the site. We started things off with Best Linux Distribution, and nearly 10,000 readers voted. The winner was Debian, with many commenting "As for servers, Debian is still the best" or similar.

    One to watch that is rising in the polls is Manjaro, which is independently based on the Arch Linux. Manjaro is a favorite for Linux newcomers and is known for its user-friendliness and accessibility.

  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #146
  • LXD weekly status #34
  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 13 February 2018

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team.

  • Ubuntu LoCo Council: Three month wrap-up

    The new LoCo Council has been a little lax with updating this blog. It’s admittedly taken us a little bit of time to figure out what exactly we’re doing, but we seem to be on our feet now. I’d like to rectify the blog issue by wrapping up the first three months of our reign in a summary post to get us back on track.

elementary OS 5.0 "Juno" Will Be Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Coming This Year

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OS
Ubuntu

According to the elementary OS developer, the next release of the Ubuntu-based operating system is getting a new versioning scheme, updated kernel and graphics stacks, as well as the latest GTK+ technologies.

We already knew that "Juno" would be the codename of the next major elementary OS release, but it now looks like the version number was changed from 0.5 to 5.0, which, apparently, won't mean anything to regular users.

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19-Way CPU Comparison On Ubuntu With Linux 4.15

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Ubuntu

Following the release of the Linux 4.15 kernel with KPTI and Retpoline introduction, many Phoronix readers were interested in seeing a fresh Linux CPU performance comparison. For those reasons plus in preparing for the Raven Ridge testing, here are benchmarks of 19 different systems when using Ubuntu x86_64 with the Linux 4.15 stable kernel.

An assortment of 19 different systems from old to new and from low-end to high-end were tested, ranging from old AMD A10 Kaveri APUs to the high-end AMD EPYC 7601 server processor, with a similar breadth of CPUs tested on the Intel side. Again, these tests are mostly being done for reference purposes. And in the days ahead will be a larger low-end-focused CPU comparison for the upcoming Ryzen 3 2200G / Ryzen 5 2400G Linux benchmarking.

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Also: Ryzen 3 2200G + Ryzen 5 2400G Linux Benchmarks Coming Tomorrow

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More in Tux Machines

Amazon Linux 2 - Who nicked my cheese?

So far, it's a relatively benign, easy introduction to a new operating system that blends the familiar and new in a timid package. Perhaps that's the goal, because a radical offering would right away scare everyone. Amazon Linux 2 is an appealing concept, as it gives users what Red Hat never quite did (yet) - A Fedora-like bleeding-edge tech with the stability and long-term support of the mainstay enterprise offering. But then, it also pulls a Debian/Ubuntu stunt by breaking ABI, so it will be cubicle to those who enjoying living la vida loco (in their cubicle or open-space prison). Having lived and breathed the large-scale HPC world for many years, I am quite piqued to see how this will evolve. Performance, stability and ease of use will be my primary concerns. Then, is it possible to hook up a remote virtual machine into the EC2 hive? That's another experiment, and I'd like to see if scaling and deployment works well over distributed networks. Either way, even if nothing comes out of it, Amazon Linux 2 is a nice start to a possibly great adventure. Or yet another offspring in the fragmented family we call Linux. Time will tell. Off you go. Cloud away. Read more

Updates From OpenIndiana and LibreOffice (Projects That Oracle Discarded)

  • Migration to GCC 6.4 as userland compiler
    Modulo some minor details, the transition of our userland to GCC 6 is complete.
  • OpenIndiana Has Upgraded To The GCC 6 Compiler
    The OpenSolaris/Illumos-based OpenIndiana operating system has finally moved past GCC 4.9 as its base user-land compiler and is now using GCC 6.4. This comes while GCC 8.1 should be officially released in the next few weeks and they are already targeting GCC 7.3.0 as their next illumos-gate compiler.
  • LibreOffice 6.0 Open-Source Office Suite Passes 1 Million Downloads Mark
    The Document Foundation announced recently that its LibreOffice 6.0 open-source and cross-platform office suite reached almost 1 million downloads since its release last month on January 31, 2018. That's terrific news for the Open Source and Free Software community and a major milestone for the acclaimed LibreOffice office suite, which tries to be a free alternative to proprietary solutions like Microsoft Office. The 1 million downloads mark was reached just two weeks after the release of LibreOffice 6.0, which is the biggest update ever of the open-source office suite adding numerous new features and enhancements over previous versions.

FreeBSD Finally Gets Mitigated For Spectre & Meltdown (and Hugs)

  • FreeBSD Finally Gets Mitigated For Spectre & Meltdown
    Landing in FreeBSD today was the mitigation work for the Meltdown and Spectre CPU vulnerabilities. It's taken a few more weeks longer than most of the Linux distributions to be re-worked for Spectre/Meltdown mitigation as well as DragonFlyBSD, but with FreeBSD Revision 329462 it appears their initial fixes are in place. There is Meltdown mitigation for Intel CPUs via a KPTI implementation similar to Linux, the Kernel Page Table Isolation. There is also a PCID (Process Context Identifier) optimization for Intel Westmere CPUs and newer, just as was also done on Linux.
  • FreeBSD outlaws virtual hugs
  • AsiaBSDCon 2018 Conference Programme

Linux: To recurse or not

Linux and recursion are on very good speaking terms. In fact, a number of Linux command recurse without ever being asked while others have to be coaxed with just the right option. When is recursion most helpful and how can you use it to make your tasks easier? Let’s run through some useful examples and see. Read more